Wednesday, July 11, 2018

Acclimating our endurance horses for heat and humidity

KarenChaton.com - Full Article

by Karen Chaton

It has suddenly gotten hotter. It should get up to 90 degrees here today and will get even warmer than that in the next few days. I know in previous years when I have ridden my horses more in the heat, they acclimate to it rather well and have done well on rides that were very hot or else hot and humid.

When my horses have gone to rides that were suddenly hot or abnormally hot and humid compared to the kind of conditions we had been riding in – it was a lot harder on them.

This got me curious about how long it takes to acclimate a horse to riding in heat and humidity. I was able to find quite a bit of information including a few studies where they were able to acclimate horses in 21 days, with results showing up in 14 days. Perfect timing for those planning on going to the Tevis – NOW is the time to really get our horses acclimated to the heat. Later this week we are also due to have afternoon thunderstorms which means it will be hot AND humid. As a side benefit, while I am getting my horses better prepared to handle working in hotter and more humid conditions I will also be acclimating myself.

I know riders who have worked their horses with sheets on in order to help the horse learn to deal with the additional heat load. That makes sense. It’s a lot like working them in the spring with their winter coat and then doing a full body clip just before a ride. With careful monitoring of your horses vital signs you can do this safely – just make sure your horse doesn’t over heat or become dehydrated, and that you allow enough time for the horse to recover after each work out...

Read more here:
http://www.karenchaton.com/2010/07/acclimating-endurance-horses-heat-humidity/

Wednesday, July 04, 2018

FEI: Permitted Equine Therapists (PETs)

FEI.org

Permitted Equine Therapist (PET) is a new category of personnel introduced in 2018. PETs are permitted to carry out ‘Restricted Therapies’ in which they have been trained, according to the Veterinary Regulations 2018, Chapter VI.

Registration of Permitted Equine Therapists

As of 1 July 2018 anyone who carries out Restricted Therapies at FEI events must be a PET. PETs are required to fill in the Registration Form (found below) and give it to the Veterinary Delegate on arrival at the event. Stewards have started to carry out PET identification checks at events. Should any person, who is not a PET or Permitted Treating Veterinarian, carry out Restricted Therapies at FEI event they will be sanctioned in accordance with the Veterinary Regulations, Annex VI.

Applying to become a Permitted Equine Therapist
In order to apply to become a PET, we strongly suggest applicants read the 'Guidelines for Applicants' found below. Applications are received and reviewed by the applicant's National Federation. Once their approval has been sought, the applicant must pass an online examination in order to obtain the PET status.

For guidelines and registration form see:
https://inside.fei.org/fei/your-role/veterinarians/permitted-equine-therapists

Tuesday, July 03, 2018

Horses Have Had Dental Appointments in Mongolia for Over 3,000 Years

LiveScience.com - Full Article

By Laura Geggel, Senior Writer | July 2, 2018

Imagine extracting a wayward tooth from a young horse more than two millennia before the discovery of laughing gas. It may sound like a Herculean task, but the ancient people of Mongolia figured it out, making them the oldest veterinary dentists on record.

Researchers made the discovery by examining 85 ancient horse remains, dating from about 1200 B.C. to 700 B.C., that had been buried in equine graves by the nomadic Deer Stone-Khirigsuur culture in Mongolia. The researchers found that one of these teeth was sticking out at an odd angle and had been cut, possibly with a stone, in about 1150 B.C., making it the oldest known evidence of horse dentistry in the world...

Read more here:
https://www.livescience.com/62974-oldest-horse-dentistry-on-record.html

Monday, July 02, 2018

Trailering the Trail Horse

Trailmeister.com - Full Article

June 5 2018
by Robert Eversole

Trailering the Trail Horse

As Published in the May 2018 issue of The Horsemen’s Corral

Spring and summer are upon us and with them trail riding. Unless you’re one of the fortunate few that has immediate access to trails you most likely have to load your mounts and haul to the trails. With that in mind let’s take a moment to consider what goes into hauling our horses and mules.

The effort involved with towing starts long before we arrive at the trail head or even hook up the trailer. Consider the training aspect of trailering a horse. Just as we might not enjoy riding down the road in a noisy, bumpy, and drafty trailer, most horses tend to be a bit leery of this dark box, fortunately given enough time and patience most equines learn to tolerate the process.

Most of us have had experience with a horse that refuses to load or races out of the trailer. Practice obedience and calmness by asking him to walk forward, stand quietly, and back up on your command. The objective is for your horse to walk quietly into the trailer, stand there for a bit, and then calmly back out on your command. How long it takes to get here depends on you and your horse. Teaching your horse to load takes patience, trust and much groundwork before he’ll be a consistent loader. But once that happens he’ll step into any trailer when asked and unload easily and relaxed when you arrive at the trailhead. Quiet and confident trailering equates into a pleasure ride for both of you...

Read more here:
https://www.trailmeister.com/trailering-the-trail-horse-2/

How long does strangles survive in the environment?

EquineScienceUpdate Blog - Full Article

June 23 2018

Veterinarians and horse handlers should be aware that Streptococcus equi, the organism responsible for strangles, may survive in the environment for longer than previously thought, according to new research.

The study, by Andy Durham and colleagues, has been reported in the Equine Veterinary Journal.

The researchers inoculated S. equi cultures onto seven surfaces found in veterinary practices or in stables, and took serial samples to see how long the organism remained viable.

The test surfaces included a wet plastic bucket, a dental rasp, inside a naso-gastric tube and a fence post...

Read more here:
https://equinescienceupdate.blogspot.com/2018/06/how-long-does-strangles-survive-in.html

Sunday, July 01, 2018

Bill Introduced in Senate in Response to ELD Mandate

Thehorse.com - Full Article

Senator Ben Sasse introduced the legislation in an effort to insulate the livestock industry from the electronic logging device (ELD) changes facing the commercial trucking industry.

By American Horse Council | May 30, 2018

On May 23, Senator Ben Sasse (R-MT) introduced the ‘‘Transporting Livestock Across America Safely Act,” in an effort to insulate the livestock industry from the electronic logging device (ELD) mandate facing the commercial trucking industry.

In it the Secretary of Transportation would amend the federal regulations to ensure that a driver transporting livestock or insects within a 300 air-mile radius from the point at which the driver begins the trip shall exclude all time spent;

At a plant, terminal, facility, or other property of a motor carrier or shipper or on any public property during which the driver is waiting to be dispatched;
Loading or unloading a commercial motor vehicle;
Supervising or assisting in the loading or unloading of a commercial motor vehicle;
Attending to a commercial motor vehicle while the vehicle is being loaded or unloaded;
Remaining in readiness to operate a commercial motor vehicle; and
Giving or receiving receipts for shipments loaded or unloaded;...

Read more here:
https://thehorse.com/158319/bill-introduced-in-senate-in-response-to-eld-mandate/

Could You Be Missing the Signs of Gastric Ulcers in Horses?

Thehorse.com - Full Article

Behavior and performance changes that could be associated with gastric ulcers in horses should prompt further veterinary investigation.

By Edited Press Release | May 29, 2018

Sometimes a training ride or a show doesn’t go well. You wonder, “Is my horse just having a bad day?” But before riders place blame on any variety of causes—from the weather and the environment to the horse’s athletic ability or even their own errors—they should consider another potential problem: equine stomach ulcers.

Less-than-optimal performance, resistance to work, and training difficulties are all common issues associated with gastric ulcers, which can develop in as few as five days. If you have noticed behaviors such as your horse pinning his ears while being groomed, or kicking out when the girth is tightened, equine stomach ulcers could be a possibility, and it might be time to contact your veterinarian.

“When horses are having behavioral issues or even decreased performance in the show ring, riders and trainers should consider stomach ulcers,” says Hoyt Cheramie, DVM, MS, Dipl. ACVS, senior equine professional service veterinarian for Boehringer Ingelheim. “An equine veterinarian will be able to diagnose ulcers via gastroscopy...”

Read more here:
https://thehorse.com/158302/could-you-be-missing-the-signs-of-gastric-ulcers-in-horses/