Monday, April 12, 2021

Gut Bacteria “Talk” to Horse’s Cells to Extend Energy Output, Improve Their Athletic Performance

SciTechDaily.com - Full Article

By FRONTIERS
APRIL 7, 2021

Study linking gut bacteria to more efficient energy generation in the cells of horses paves the way for dietary supplements that enhance their performance.

A horse’s gut microbiome communicates with its host by sending chemical signals to its cells, which has the effect of helping the horse to extend its energy output, finds a new study published in Frontiers in Molecular Biosciences. This exciting discovery paves the way for dietary supplements that could enhance equine athletic performance.

“We are one of the first to demonstrate that certain types of equine gut bacteria produce chemical signals that communicate with the mitochondria in the horse’s cells that regulate and generate energy,” says Eric Barrey, author of this study and the Integrative Biology and Equine Genetics team leader at the National Research Institute for Agriculture, Food and Environment, France. “We believe that metabolites — small molecules created by breaking down bigger molecules for food or growth — produced by these bacteria have the effect of delaying low blood sugar and inflammation in the cells, which in turn extends the horse’s athletic performance...”

Read more here: https://scitechdaily.com/gut-bacteria-talk-to-horses-cells-to-extend-energy-output-improve-their-athletic-performance/

Thursday, April 08, 2021

Long Riding with Nevada Discovery Ride

RideClimb.com Podcast - Listen

April 7, 2021
by Jess

Have you ever wished a trail ride wouldn’t end? Then, you may want to consider long riding; which is simply long distance travel on horseback. It’s not competitive, it’s not timed, and there are no limits. It’s just an adventure.

My guest today is long rider, Samantha Szesciorka. She has completed two journeys across Nevada and she’s about to embark on her third. On her first long ride in 2013, Sam rode 500 miles across Nevada from Baker in the east to Reno in the west...

Read more and listen:
https://rideclimb.com/podcast/long-riding-with-nevada-discovery-ride/

Wild at Heart: Trekking Across Australia with the Brumbies

(Cat Vinton photo)
Horse-Canada.com - Full Article

Armed only with her wits and a GPS connected to a support team, French author Aliénor le Gouvello tackled the infamous 5,330 km trail.

By: Kim Izzo | April 7, 2021

When French expat Aliénor le Gouvello encountered semi-wild Brumbies in the Australian outback, she was immediately obsessed. An animal fiercely loved by some and considered a scourge by others, Brumbies have a complicated place in Australian culture and history. Inspired to celebrate their character, le Gouvello tamed three brumbies ‒ Roxanne, River and Cooper ‒ and teamed up with them to take on the physical and mental challenges of the Bicentennial National Trail, Australia’s longest trek, which passes through 18 of Australia’s national parks and more than 50 state forests...

Read more here:
https://horse-canada.com/magazine/profiles/wild-heart-trekking-across-australia-with-brumbies/

Wednesday, April 07, 2021

Life After Racing giving retired racehorses a new career in UAE

Khaleejtimes.com - Full Article

Tamanna Sajeed/Dubai
Filed on April 6, 2021

The league aims to encourage ex-racehorses and their riders to compete in new disciplines, and runs till April 30, 2021

The UAE’s world-class racing scene has been bringing joy to equestrians for decades. Now a UAE-based non-profit organisation aims to do the same for the racehorses that once illuminated the iconic Meydan racecourse.

Life After Racing was launched on February 15, 2021, by Dubai-based expats Debbie Armaly and her co-founders Sophie Dyball and Karen Stewart. The league aims to encourage ex-racehorses and their riders to compete in new disciplines, and runs till April 30, 2021.

“They can go on to compete in new disciplines… show jumping, dressage, cross-country, or just a general happy hacker - they don’t have to compete in their new lives,” says Armaly, a syndicate member of the Emirates Entertainment Racing Club who has been rehoming ex-racehorses from the UAE for over a decade.

She has rehomed horses such as Prince Shaun, Los Barbados, My Catch and Shamaal Nibras who have all ran on the World Cup night in previous years...

Read more here:
https://www.khaleejtimes.com/sport/horse-racing/life-after-racing-giving-retired-racehorses-a-new-career-in-uae

Monday, April 05, 2021

Your Horse Needs Forage Even at Night

TheHorse.com - Full Article

More than four hours without feed is fasting for a horse and can lead to issues. The solution for evening feeding? Slow feeders extended nighttime “grazing” time by 95-105%, researchers observed.

Posted by Christa Lesté-Lasserre, MA | Sep 9, 2019

Night falls, and it’s time for bed. Your horse has had his last hay meal of the day and is comfortably in his freshly cleaned stall for a good night’s sleep. All’s well, right?

Actually, if you’ve fed loose hay, you might be the only one enjoying a comfortable evening. According to Irish and Scottish researchers, horses can consume loose haylage quickly and end up waiting so many hours before their morning meal that it could affect their health.

“Recent recommendations highlight that when horses go more than four hours without food, they’re technically fasting,” said Barbara Hardman, a postgraduate MSc from the University of Edinburgh’s Royal (Dick) School of Veterinary Studies, in Scotland. “Foraging (the behavior of consuming forage) is a ‘highly motivated’ behavior for horses, meaning that it’s critical that they perform it for not only their gut health but their mental health, as well...”

Read more here:
https://thehorse.com/178397/your-horse-needs-forage-even-at-night/?utm_medium=Reader+Favorites+enews&utm_source=Newsletter

Friday, April 02, 2021

Barn Owls and Horses: Nature’s Mousetrap

Thehorse.com - Full Article

A barn owl family will consume nearly 2,000 mice or other rodents in just a couple of months. The good news for you is all it requires is the installation of a simple nest box—and the right habitat for their prey.

Posted by Alayne Blickle | Mar 13, 2021

The mouse situation in your horse barn is getting out of control. You know mice can carry diseases, some serious to humans. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, mice and rats can directly or indirectly transmit 20 diseases worldwide. Several of these, such as leptospirosis and salmonellosis, affect horses, as well. And what about the moles and gophers in your pasture making a mess of things with their telltale little piles of dirt and “ankle-breaking” holes?

Rodents are probably one of the toughest issues to deal with on horse properties. They’re small, stealthy, and primarily active after dark when we can’t see them. So how do you reduce the populations of these persistent little things without lethal trapping or using chemicals that are deadly to other animals in the ecosystem, including dogs and cats?...

Read more here:
https://thehorse.com/198007/barn-owls-and-horses-natures-mousetrap/?utm_medium=Farm%20barn%20enews&utm_source=Newsletter

Thursday, April 01, 2021

Proud Flesh and How to Prevent it

USRider.org - Full Article

By Horse & Rider | 2/1/2016

What Proud Flesh Is:

As your horse's wound begins to heal, pinkish granulation tissue fills in the gaps between soft tissues. Granulation tissue normally stops forming as the skin edges grow together to close the wound. But when healing doesn't go according to plan, the granulation tissue becomes exuberant-it keeps growing until it bulges above skin level, so newly formed skin can't grow over the wound. That's proud flesh.

When Proud Flesh happens:

Proud flesh tends to form in wounds below your horse's knees and hocks, where there's little soft tissue between skin and bone, and where movement constantly tugs the wound's edges. It's most likely to occur in places with lots of movement, such as over joints, or when a complication, such as infection, slows healing.

How to prevent Proud Flesh:...

Read more here:
https://www.usrider.org/article/proud-flesh-prevent-31258-41?utm_campaign=USR%20-%20IP%20-%20Health%20Tip&utm_medium=email&_hsmi=115542369&_hsenc=p2ANqtz-8bS__le5ohZsC5NkoVJyMAmblUa3dIKY2vHOMaKchJAI96WHC30rTq9AtqfoJ_zddkzvrhuxQqYAtBomberrXhB8LCZw&utm_content=115542369&utm_source=hs_email