Wednesday, September 22, 2021

Happy trails: Mandan, S.D. resident journeys 276 miles to Deadwood in the saddle

Dennis Knuckles photo

BHPioneer.com - Full Article

By Jaci Conrad Pearson, Black Hills Pioneer
September 21 2021

DEADWOOD — If anyone is wondering how long it might take to travel from Mandan, N.D., to Deadwood on horseback, David Sterna, who rode into town Friday afternoon from his hometown, can give a first-hand account.

“Thirteen days,” Sterna said, adding nights were spent under the stars. “We’d go back and we stayed a lot at Chain Hill. We’d ride so many miles and go back and camp and the last four days, I stayed with my cousin, Joe (Sterna) in Newell.”

Choosing to make the trek and follow the 276-mile Bismarck to Deadwood stagecoach trail, which ran from 1876 to 1880, Sterna said he did it in honor of his family’s three generations of ties to the land and the dying art of working with horses.

“Our family’s the end of an age,” Sterna said. “We farmed with horses. We had horses our whole life. I’m the youngest grandson out of eight brothers and the last one left with a horse and I always wanted to try and make a long-distance trip and we did it...”

Read more here:
https://www.bhpioneer.com/local_news/happy-trails/article_5582dcb0-1b05-11ec-99f8-634b280f77f9.html

Tuesday, August 24, 2021

Quesnel Canadian Rangers familiarize themselves with historic Gold Rush terrain

QuesnelObserver.com - Full Story

REBECCA DYOK
Aug. 20, 2021 5:30 a.m.

On horseback, members of the Quesnel Canadian Ranger Patrol (CRP) trotted through an area with a rich history of gold mining last month in a mission stimulating what it would like when they are called to deploy for a ground search and rescue.

Exercise Goldfield Sojourn got underway Thursday, July 15, with a convoy of trucks and trailers driving from Quesnel to Wells where a reception centre was set up. Rangers met with village residents, community officials, members of the local RCMP detachment and the Wells Volunteer Fire Brigade.

From there, the rangers drove to a new location and set up an administration area and camp where they spent the night, said Captain Natasha Tersigni, public affairs officer with 4th Canadian Ranger Patrol (CRP).

The group departed on horseback in the morning and rode through Barkerville Historic Town and Park up to Groundhog Lake, riding a rocky, steep trail that follows the old Cariboo Wagon Road and a historic ditch line.

“When called upon to assist, members of the CRP typically have less than an hour to gather their equipment, including their horses, and begin deploying to the location where the search will occur,” Tersigni said...

Read more here:
https://www.quesnelobserver.com/news/quesnel-canadian-rangers-familiarize-themselves-with-historic-gold-rush-terrain/

Thursday, August 12, 2021

Bute vs Banamine – what's the difference?

HorseAndRider.com - Full Article

The two pain-relieving prescription medications that most horse owners keep on hand are Bute and Banamine – but do you know the differences between the two?

JILLIAN SINCLAIR
UPDATED:AUG 4, 2021 - ORIGINAL:AUG 4, 2021

Both Bute and Banamine are non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) that are used to reduce inflammation and pain in horses. While these drugs sound similar and seem like they could be interchangeable, there are actually several different situations for when you should use one or the other. Read on to see the main differences between Bute and Banamine, and when the right time to use each one is...

Read more here:
https://horseandrider.com/horse-health-care/bute-vs-banamine-whats-the-difference?RiderNL&%3Butm_medium=email&%3Butm_campaign=Newsletter&utm_campaign=HAR%20%20-%20NL&utm_medium=email&_hsmi=147302396&_hsenc=p2ANqtz--vTXS0jCfMzaFsfoh8yL2Yd8atKVhkQkmutE9psOoMBEAa-zawmXlthIpFwzE5hXFxQtxlF7CzSNmwiq8sUqSG83_WLQ&utm_content=147302396&utm_source=hs_email

Sunday, August 08, 2021

Staving Off Summer Weight Loss in Horses

TheHorse.com - Full Article

Don’t forget horses require calories to keep cool in the heat.

Posted by Clair Thunes, PhD | Aug 2, 2021

Q. With the extreme heat this summer I’m struggling to keep weight on my horse. I’m not used to dealing with summer weight loss. Our pastures are pretty dried out, so we are feeding a good amount of hay. Typically, I just feed a balancer, but this doesn’t seem to be enough. Do you have any advice?

A. We often think of weight loss in horses as a winter issue, when they need more calories to keep warm. However, we don’t often consider that horses also require calories keep cool in hot weather.

Thermal neutral zone (TNZ) is the range of environmental temperatures horses need for minimal metabolic regulation to maintain their internal temperature. When horses are within their TNZ, the basal rate of heat production equals the loss of heat to the environment. They neither heat up nor cool down...

Read more here:
https://thehorse.com/1102454/staving-off-summer-weight-loss-in-horses/?utm_medium=Nutrition+enews&utm_source=Newsletter

Wednesday, August 04, 2021

Equine Air Scenting: Are Search-and-Rescue Horses a Thing?

Horse-Canada.com - Full Article

Horses have unique qualities which enable them to detect scents, which anyone can try at home to give your horse a chance to problem-solve.

By: Kim Izzo | July 28, 2021

Search and rescue teams, the military and police, border patrol officers, all employ the unique talents of “sniffer dogs.” We’ve seen footage of these dogs in the news, searching for survivors at catastrophic events like the recent condo collapse in Surfside, Florida, or we’ve witnessed them firsthand being walked through baggage claim at airports. The dogs are highly-trained professionals. And now, they have competition: sniffer horses (and ponies).

The practice of “equine air scenting” is used by various organizations in Western Canada, the United States and the United Kingdom, where some horses are also trained in drug detection. Currently there are no ‘professional’ equine sniffers in Ontario, but that might soon change.

The Ontario Mounted Special Service Unit (OMSSU), a non-profit organization made up of volunteers, is currently training horses in the air scent division with the hopes of being given work in the fields that require such a service. Cindy Fuerth, director of OMSSU, told Global News that the group is planning to expand and hire in the coming year by recruiting around 20 riders to the program. The program will involve the owners/riders and their horses to complete intensive training. Riders will also take online and in-person classes...

Read more here:
https://horse-canada.com/magazine/equine-ownership/equine-air-scenting-search-rescue-horses-thing/

Tuesday, July 13, 2021

Good golly Mollie: why I rode 1,000 miles around Ireland on a Connemara pony

TheGuardian.com - Full Article

Hilary Bradt
Mon 12 Jul 2021 01.30 EDT

The guidebook publisher’s dream of a solo horseback trip came true, but proved a greater challenge – and more exhilarating – than she’d thought possible

When did I first make the transition from enjoying horse riding as an accomplishment to realising that seeing spectacular scenery from the back of a horse is an end in itself – slow travel at its very best? I think it was in the Grand Tetons in Wyoming, about as spectacular a place as you can get, but also as tiring as any mountain hike if you’re on foot, with thin air, steep paths and treacherous drops.

On my horse Everest (of course I sent a photo home of Hilary on Everest), I could just gaze unimpeded at the snow-patched mountains, the gurgling streams and the big sky, and soak up the feeling of emptiness. My friend and I stayed on a dude ranch, slept in tents at night and rode an 80-mile circuit on those comfy western saddles. That holiday, in the 1960s, confirmed the rightness of my childhood dream of buying a horse and riding a long, long way...

Read more here:
https://www.theguardian.com/travel/2021/jul/12/why-i-rode-1000-miles-around-ireland-on-a-connemara-pony

Relief in sight for global horse industry battling gastric disease

MirageNews.com - Full Article

12 July 2021

Millions of horse owners the world over are set to benefit from a more effective method to treat equine gastric disease, a common condition affecting horses, especially in thoroughbred racing and the endurance riding sector.

An eight-year joint project between the University of South Australia and animal health industry partner Luoda Pharma has produced a long-acting, weekly injectable medicine, which heals horses a lot faster than current treatments.

Lead researcher, UniSA pharmaceutical scientist Professor Sanjay Garg, says the current standard treatment for gastric disease – an oral paste – has to be administered daily into the horse’s mouth and sometimes is only 30 per cent effective.

“It is not only time consuming but not all horses accept this treatment willingly. For maximum effect, horses also can’t be fed prior to the paste being administered,” Prof Garg says.

The new injectable formulation of omeprazole developed by UniSA and Luoda Pharma is now used widely in horses in Europe, with outstanding results, and has become the treatment of choice for many veterinarians...

Read more here:
https://www.miragenews.com/relief-in-sight-for-global-horse-industry-593852/

Dealing With Equine Colic: Here are 33 Do's and Don’ts

Thehorse.com - Full Article

Do you know what to do–and just as importantly, what not to do–if your horse displays vague, mild, or serious signs of what might be colic? Your answer could save your horse’s life.

By Marcia King

The changes indicating colic were subtle but nevertheless concerning. Rufus, a Thoroughbred/Warmblood jumper, wasn’t himself, recalls owner Sydney Durieux of New York City. “Rufus was always attentive, playful almost, wrapping his neck around you and giving you a kind of hug, straining his neck to reach you,” she describes. But that evening Rufus ignored Durieux and just stared, looking distracted and vaguely uncomfortable. “He wasn’t swaying, pawing, or looking at his stomach, but when the trainer listened to Rufus’ belly, she couldn’t detect any sounds,” she says.

After a half-hour, Durieux trailered him to a veterinary hospital an hour away. “Both the trainer and I thought we might be overreacting, but our hunch was right: The veterinarian said Rufus had colic and needed immediate surgery,” she says. “I was shocked, because every other horse I’d seen with colic had been very distressed.”

Sometimes it’s pretty obvious something is painfully wrong and the veterinarian should be summoned. Other times mild clinical signs might accurately reflect a mild colic that easily and quickly responds to minimal management without a vet even seeing the horse. Then there are those times when mild clinical signs don’t indicate the severity of a problem that could result in death if treatment is delayed.

Do you know what to do–and just as importantly, what not to do–if your horse displays vague, mild, or serious signs of what might be colic? How do you handle the situation? Actions to take/avoid with your horse’s recovery plan? How to minimize the risk for colic in the first place?

The following are 33 tips to use as guidelines...

Read more here:
https://thehorse.com/features/dealing-with-equine-colic/?utm_medium=Health+enews&utm_source=Newsletter

Thursday, July 08, 2021

Goals

GoPony.me - Full Article

JUNE 30, 2021 / ASHLEY WINGERT

At the last Arizona Endurance Riders Club learning event, the topic of discussion was on goal-setting within endurance. One of the beautiful things about this sport is how varied and encompassing those goals can be. Whether it’s starting out and having a goal of getting to and finishing your first ride, or setting your sights on Top Tenning at Tevis and showing for the Haggin Cup, and everything in between those two points…endurance seems to be able to accommodate a wide range.

It’s no secret that I have always dreamed big when it comes to this sport. I set my sights high, am willing to take risks and chances, and don’t always wait for the stars to be in 100% alignment before trying something…but that also means I’ve frequently fallen short of hitting those goals. And at least as of yet, it still hasn’t stopped me from dreaming and setting more goals.

If nothing else, this sport will teach resilience, and make you dig deep to hold on to your inner grit and determination. It teaches you how to re-frame disappointment and perceived failure...

Read more here:
https://gopony.me/2021/06/30/goals/

Thursday, July 01, 2021

Algae in Horse Water Troughs: Is It Safe?

TheHorse.com - Full Article

Our nutrition expert offers tips for keeping algal blooms to a minimum in your horse’s water trough this summer.

Posted by Clair Thunes, PhD | Jun 5, 2017

Q: For most of the year my horses live out full time on pasture. In the summer their water trough grows a lot of algae. Is it okay for them to drink from the trough when it has algae, and what can I do to stop it growing? A:Algae in troughs is a common problem once temperatures start to rise. To grow, algae need water, sunlight, and a nutrient source. Nutrients can come from organic material that has blown into the trough, manure, or even your horse’s saliva.

While most algae don’t pose a direct health concern, certain types of blue-green algae release toxins that can lead to colic and diarrhea. Additionally, a lot of algae might make the water less desirable to your horse and lead to reduced water intake. Keeping algal blooms to a minimum in your troughs is therefore a smart idea. Here are some solutions...

Read more here:
https://thehorse.com/110425/algae-in-horse-water-troughs-is-it-safe/?utm_medium=Reader+Favorites+enews&utm_source=Newsletter

Sunday, June 27, 2021

Nevada, Missouri, Friends Riding Horses Cross Country To Mount Rushmore

WIBWnewsnow.com - Full Article

JUN 16, 2021 @ 8:59AM

By Frank J. Buchman

“Cris and Forrest are living their dream.”

The Nevada, Missouri, horsemen left home June 1, 2021, on horseback with one packhorse headed to South Dakota’s Black Hills.

“It’s something I always wanted to do. We decided the window of opportunity was right and just took off,” said Cris Rodriquez.

“I really hadn’t even ridden horses until about two years ago. But then got into riding with Cris and here we are,” added Forrest Drury.

“We really don’t have a set route, just follow our instinct, with advice we’re given along the way,” Rodriquez admitted. They do have solar powered cell phones with maps and also use a GPS global positioning system.

Traveling an average of about 23-miles per day, the horsemen ride both major highways and country backroads.

“We try to take in as much of the different landscapes as we can,” Rodriquez said. “We have ridden up to 36 miles in a day, but that’s too much as hot as it’s getting.”

“The best part of the journey though has been meeting all of the people,” Drury insisted. “Everybody is very congenial, welcoming, interested in what we’re doing...”

Read more here:
https://www.wibwnewsnow.com/nevada-missouri-friends-riding-horses-cross-country-to-mount-rushmore/

Friday, June 25, 2021

Pennsylvania: Riding Stable Offers Second Career For Former Montco D.A.

Patch.com - Full article

Mike Marino was near the end of his term as the Montgomery County district attorney when he had the idea to open a riding stable.

Delaware Valley Journal, News Partner
Posted Wed, Jun 23, 2021 at 4:21 pm ET

By Linda Stein, Delaware Valley Journal

June 23, 2021

Mike Marino was near the end of his term as the Montgomery County district attorney when he had the idea to open a riding stable as a way to keep busy after leaving office. And the name for the stable, "Red Buffalo Ranch" came to him in a dream, he said in a recent interview with the Delaware Valley Journal.

He had no idea the riding stable–which offers trail rides, lessons and a summer camp for kids–would become so successful when he opened it in 1998.

"The saying goes, 'If you build it they will come,'" he said. And although it was shut down for three weeks last year during the pandemic, once Gov. Tom Wolf re-opened the parks the stable, which abuts Evansburg State Park, was back in business.

"Because you're on a horse, you're socially distant so people could ride without the mask on and still be compliant," he said. "Well, people started coming out of the woodwork because people wanted to get away, to get out and our business doubled."

Marino, 79, who grew up as a city kid in Norristown, didn't know much about horses when he got his first steed in 1970. He was an assistant district attorney then making $7,500 a year and his mother asked him if he could afford the horse.

"And I said, 'No, but I'm going to buy him anyway,' and that was my lucky horse," said Marino. "Because of that horse, I ended up here, with property. It was a very fortuitous horse..."

Read more here:
https://patch.com/pennsylvania/across-pa/riding-stable-offers-second-career-former-montco-d

100! Western States Endurance Run is back, includes local threat among elite men

GoldCountryMedia.com - Full Article

Rocklin’s Tollefson set to compete for first time; women’s field strong again

Bill Poindexter Jun 23, 2021 10:30 AM

What happens when excitement clashes with pent-up energy? Show up for the Western States Endurance Run on Saturday and find out.

The field is a little smaller this year as the 100-mile event returns for its Olympic Valley-to-Auburn run, but it’s no less packed with star power, including Jim Walmsley, who broke the course record in 2018, then hacked another 20 minutes off his mark a year later.

Jared Hazen, like Walmsley from Flagstaff, Ariz., was the runner-up in 2019. Rocklin’s Tim Tollefson is in the Western States for the first time and becomes an immediate threat. He won the Bishop High Sierra on May 22 by 35 minutes.

Meanwhile, eight of the top 10 women from 2019 are back in the Western States, including defending champion Clare Gallagher of Boulder, Colo., and runner-up Brittany Peterson of Pocatello, Idaho. Diana Fitzpatrick, president of the board of directors for the Western States Endurance Run, described the international women in the elite field as “exciting...”

Read more here:
https://goldcountrymedia.com/news/190282/100-western-states-endurance-run-is-back-includes-local-threat-among-elite-men/

Monday, June 14, 2021

Tevis Fever - Ashley Wingert

GoPony.me - Full Article

JUNE 2, 2021 / ASHLEY WINGERT

It never goes away. It might ebb and wane for a time, but it’s always there, waiting.

51 days and counting until this year’s Tevis. This week, I’ve been working on finalizing details and travel arrangements for heading out there to crew again. Within a couple of months following the 2019 ride, Cathy put crew dibs on me for the following year…which, of course, got cancelled. So those crew dibs rolled forward into this year.

Earlier in the year, I was “meh” about it. Not sure I wanted to travel, unsure of how many restrictions would still be in place and have to be dealt with, how many hoops jumped through…just not sure it was worth it. But as plans have started to come together, and as life starts to once again slowly start resembling something a little closer to “normal”, without “new” attached to the front of it…I can feel myself getting excited again...

Read more here:
https://gopony.me/2021/06/02/tevis-fever/

Saturday, May 29, 2021

Why thru-riding horseback rider Gillian Larson believes women should go on more adventures

Today.com - Full Article and video

Gillian Larson became the first solo thru-rider of the Pacific Crest Trail in her 20s. Here's why she wants more women to "feel free in our environment."

May 27, 2021, 12:52 PM PDT / Source: TMRW
By Erica Chayes Wida

We are all works in progress; even the successful women you see owning it on Instagram faced stumbling blocks along the way and continue to work hard to stay at the top of their game. In this series, we're sitting down with the people that inspire us to find out: How'd they do it? And what is success really like? This is "Getting There."

Through the deserts, backcountry and treacherous mountain passes of the West Coast is a trail. It stretches 2,650 miles from the Mexican to the Canadian border. And in 2014, Gillian Larson became the youngest documented woman to ride it alone on horseback.

Thru-riding is the term for the people who mount their horses and see the country in its wildest places by riding long-distance trails. Some of the most famous in the U.S. include the Pacific Crest Trail, or PCT, and the Continental Divide Trail. Larson, a native Californian who's just 29, has ridden both in their entireties, amassing more than 10,000 miles. She first did the PCT at just 22 years old, becoming the youngest woman to do so, and again in 2016.

Some may recognize the trail from the Reese Witherspoon film, "Wild," based on the 2012 memoir by Cheryl Strayed, who thru-hiked 1,100 miles of it.

Larson is an equestrian with a masters in biology who was raised about 45 minutes outside of Los Angeles in Topanga Canyon, California. And while she's accomplished a groundbreaking feat and is being recognized for her achievements, which includes starring in a documentary short film by Firestone Walker, she remains humble and eager for her next quest...

Read more and see video here:
https://www.today.com/tmrw/why-thru-riding-horseback-rider-gillian-larson-believes-women-should-t219701

How to build a trustworthy trail horse

EquusMagazine.com - Full Article

Three seasoned trail riders offer strategies for overcoming the most common spoilers of the great-outdoor horseback experience.

EQUUS
UPDATED:MAR 10, 2017 ORIGINAL:MAY 20, 2008

Ah! A nice, relaxing trail ride on a pleasant summer day: What could be better to break the tedium of ring work and soothe the stresses of show training? Just head for the hills, the woods, the rolling meadows on horseback, alone or in congenial company, and all your troubles will melt away. Yeah, right... until your horse refuses to cross the creek or runs in terror from an innocent boulder or takes up a bone-jarring jig that puts you both in a lather for the duration of the ride.

When horses and their riders are unprepared for the out-of-arena experience, a simple walk through the woods turns into a series of frustrating or frightening confrontations. The disconnect between expectations and reality often begins with the choice of mount.

"Most people don't select horses for trail riding," says Montana horseman Dan Aadland, an avid backcountry rider and author of several books on the topic. "I get tired of hearing, 'Well, she's not good enough for the show ring, but she'll make a good trail horse.' Why should trail riding be relegated to a secondary job for a horse? If you want to trail ride exclusively, buy a horse who excels at it, not one who can't do anything else..."

Read more at:
Equus Magazine

Wednesday, May 26, 2021

Woman trekking across Nevada stops in Nye

PVTimes.com - Full Article

By Daria Sokolova Special to the Pahrump Valley Times
May 25, 2021 - 11:34 pm

After taking a year-long break due to the pandemic, Samantha Szesciorka is riding her horse across Nevada again to discover the state and promote wild horse adoption and public land preservation.

This year, Szesciorka is making her way from Las Vegas to Carson City with her horse Sage and her dog Juniper for the first time and making several stops in Nye County. She arrived in Las Vegas from Reno where she lives – a week before starting her ride on May 1.

“I like the challenge, but it’s just a fun personal project. I like getting to know Nevada on horseback, because it’s just a slow immersive way to see the state and see parts of it that many people don’t get to see,” Szesciorka said in a phone interview with the Pahrump Valley Times...

Read more here:
https://pvtimes.com/news/woman-trekking-across-nevada-stops-in-nye-99562/

Tuesday, May 18, 2021

The Performance of Endurance Horses

FEI.org - Full Article

18 May 2021
by Alison Lincoln

Alison Lincoln is a rider, author, coach and freelance groom with a degree in Equine Sports Coaching

Alison Lincoln looks at the importance of energy supply, training and recovery for long-distance horses... Competitive Endurance rides are a test of the athlete’s ability to safely manage their horse’s stamina and fitness while coping with the varying terrain, distance and weather conditions on the course.

At elite level, rides can be up to 160km (100miles) long and split into 3-6 loops. That’s exactly the distance we’ll see this weekend when the Longines FEI Endurance World Championship is held in Pisa, Italy.

At the start of Endurance competitions and at the end of each loop all horses must pass a veterinary examination before being allowed to continue. If a horse fails any of these ‘vet gates’ then their result is classified as FTQ (failure to qualify).

Research at international level events show that fast riding speeds in the early stages of a ride (loops 1 and 2) and when riding in large groups is a significant risk factor linked to negative outcomes for horses and tends to be followed by a sudden drop in speed in the following loop.

In both cases, it’s likely adrenalin takes over causing combinations to get ‘carried away’ and end up travelling at speeds they haven’t trained for or aren’t capable of maintaining for any length of time.

More often than not this leads to an FTQ classification due either to lameness or fatigue. Fatigue is more than just tiredness, it’s the muscles’ inability to continue to work and occurs primarily due to the depletion of energy stores or the build-up of lactic acid. (You know that burning feeling after you’ve stacked a barn full of hay? That’s lactic acid build-up)...

Read more here:
https://www.fei.org/stories/sport/endurance/performance-endurance-horses

Monday, May 17, 2021

Book Interview: a horseback adventure recalled, 30 years on

IrishExaminer.com - Full Article

Hilary Bradt speaks with Isabel Conway about 'A Connemara Journey'.

SAT, 15 MAY, 2021 - 13:00

- A Connemara Journey: A Thousand Miles on Horseback through Western Ireland has just been published by Bradt Guides. - See www.bradtguides.com and www.hilarybradt.com

Ask veteran explorer and travel guide writer Hilary Bradt why it took her over 30 years to publish “the most important adventure of my life, the one that changed me forever” and she has a great excuse. A string of guide books, tour-leading in remote parts of the world, plus running a successful business accounted for only part of the hold-up.

She had galloped through the rough manuscript, helped by detailed diaries and tape recordings, committing a rich tapestry of human encounters, sublime Irish landscapes, places of historic interest and the odd tall story heard during her epic 1,000-mile solo horseback journey through parts of Connaught and much of Munster back in 1984 to the page in a few weeks. Then Hilary lost her manuscript.

The co-founder of Bradt Guides – today with over 200 titles the world’s largest independently owned travel guides publisher – was fulfilling a childhood ambition to do a long-distance horseback ride which brought her to Ireland, giving free rein to her adventurous spirit and two Connemara ponies...

Read more here:
https://www.irishexaminer.com/lifestyle/artsandculture/arid-40289600.html

Sunday, May 16, 2021

Searching for the Big Five on a Horseback Safari

FEI.org - Full Story

16 May 2021
Words by Sophie Baker

Sophie Baker enjoys the wonders of South Africa with some delightful horses...

I’m seated on an expansive riverside deck overlooking the South African bushveld.

My riding helmet, atop the table, rocks back and forth ever so slightly as a gentle breeze does its best to pierce through the midday heat. As I wash down a bite of homemade orange cake with a sip of coffee, Gerti Kusseler starts the safety briefing.

First up; a form stating that if I don’t follow instructions carefully, I “might get eaten.” Not by her husband, Phillip Kusseler, head guide and the other half of the dynamic German duo. But by the lions and elephants we're going in search of – on horseback.

I’m at Wait A Little, South Africa’s only horseback safari that offers guests the opportunity to see the Big Five from horseback: lion, elephant, rhino, buffalo, and leopard.

They say that Africa gets under your skin, and into your blood. You see, once you’ve set foot on her soil - like it or not - Africa is in your veins...

Read more at:
https://www.fei.org/stories/lifestyle/my-equestrian-life/horseback-safari-south-africa-wait-little

Thursday, May 13, 2021

Horse & Rider Podcast Episode 39: The Ride - Gillian Larson

Horse & Rider Podcast - Listen

This episode of The Ride is brought to you by Soft-Ride Comfort Boots. Nichole and Michaela sit down with Gillian Larson (@thru_rider) to talk about her trail riding adventures. Gillian was the youngest woman to thru ride the Pacific Crest Trail on horseback–and she has done it twice. She was the first person to thru-ride both the Pacific Crest and the Continental Divide Trail—eventually accumulating more than 10,000 backcountry wilderness miles. Listen to this inspiring episode. Then check out Gillian's short film here!

Listen at:
Horseandrider.com/podcasts

For Good Endurance in Horses, Feed for the Right Gut Bacteria

Thehorse.com - Full Article

A French study is the first to connect the gut microbiota with the mitochondria in horses, or any other species.

Posted by Christa Lesté-Lasserre, MA | Apr 9, 2021

The feed horses eat can fuel their muscle power in more ways than you might think. According to a new study, muscle cells create energy based not only on available nutrients but also what the microorganisms in the gut—which vary according to what horses eat—tell them to do.

“There are some kinds of bacteria in the gut microbiota that favor the production of energy at a (cellular) level and which, consequently, could enhance performance,” said Eric Barrey, PhD, DVM, the Integrative Biology and Equine Genetics team leader at the National Research Institute for Agriculture, Food, and Environment (INRA), in Jouy-en-Josas, France...

Read more here:
Thehorse.com

Thursday, May 06, 2021

Equestrian Adventuresses Horse Podcast Ep 127: Living & Riding in Mongolia

EquestrianAdventuresses.com - Listen

by utetonia
April 28, 2021

On today’s episode Ute talks with Julie Veloo, Equestrian Adventuress from Canada who made Mongolia her home more than ten years ago. Together with her husband, Julie runs the Veloo Foundation, operating two kindergartens for underprivileged children in Ulan Bator. Julie learned to ride at the age of fifty only after she came to Mongolia in what she calls an 35 00 Acres-Open-Arena on Mongolia horses. Today she has ridden more than 37 000 km all across Mongolia. She organises the annual Gobi Gallop endurance ride as a charity event for her foundation and she is planning the longest charity horse trek in history criss-crossing Mongolia in 2022.

Having lived in Mongolia for so many years, Julie shares her insights into Mongolian society and culture with us and talks about its people and horses which will make you want to pack your bags and book the next flight to Mongolia!

Listen:
https://equestrianadventuresses.com/2021/04/28/horse-podcast-ep-127-living-riding-in-mongolia/

Tuesday, April 27, 2021

Equestrian Adventuresses Podcast Ep 82: The Gaucho Derby and other Extreme Horse Riding Adventures

EquestrianAdventuresses.com - Listen

utetonia
January 11, 2021

On today’s episode, Ute talks with Stevie Delahunt, an Equestrian Adventuress from the USA. Stevie has participated in the Mongol Derby, the Gaucho Derby, the Tevis Cup, the Wildcoast Race in South Africa and plenty other extreme horse trails and races around the world. She uses this experience to teach other riders in boot camps, the skills they need to participate in endurance races and extreme horse adventures. She also works for The Adventurists, the company organising The Mongol Derby and the Gaucho Derby among others. She conducts the interview with the applicants and decides together with a team who will participate and who will be rejected. She tells us about another derby which is yet secret and which will come to happen in the future and what is important for her in her interviews. So, if you ever plan to join the Mongol or Gaucho Derby, be sure not to miss this episode!

Listen:
https://equestrianadventuresses.com/2021/01/11/horse-podcast-ep-82-the-gaucho-derby-and-other-extreme-horse-riding-adventures/

Monday, April 26, 2021

How a Cossack covered 5,500 miles on horseback in 1889

RBTH.com - Full Article

APR 19 2021
NIKOLAY SHEVCHENKO

He nearly froze to death, but managed to cross the finish line and impress the people and the Tsar. Cossack Dmitri Peshkov traveled from Blagoveshchensk in Russia’s Far East to St. Petersburg, then the capital of the Russian Empire, covering 8,800 kilometers (5,500 miles) on a small, but sturdy horse. By the end of the trip, he had earned the status of a countrywide celebrity and even met with the Russian Emperor.

The Mongolian breed

Peshkov, a military officer in the rank of Sotnik, came up with the idea of a grand expedition, inspired by a previous achievement of a different traveler and military officer named Mikhail Aseev, who, in 1889, rode a horse from the city of Lubny in the Poltava province of the Russian Empire, to Paris, France, covering about 2,500 kilometers.

Peshkov envisioned a much more daring enterprise, however. He planned to travel from Blagoveshchensk, a city on the eastern fronts of the Russian Empire, to St. Petersburg, covering about 8,800 kilometers in a saddle.

Read more here:
https://www.rbth.com/history/333687-cossack-dmitri-peshkov-travel-horseback

Wednesday, April 21, 2021

Equestrian Adventuresses Podcast Ep 118: How Far Can a Horse Travel in One Day

EquestrianAdventuresses.com - Listen

by utetonia
April 7, 2021

In today’s episode, Heather and Ute are talking about how far you can travel on horseback in a day. Naturally, there are some huge differences between an endurance rider with his Arabian horse and the average weekend rider with his Irish Cob, therefore it is extremely difficult to generalize. But we are giving you some examples of what can be done and talk about limitations and considerations. There are of course a lot of factors influencing the speed and distance you can travel on a day or multi-day ride and we will discuss many of them such as weather, terrain, access to water and feed, and so on. But we also give you some tips on how to get your horse fit for the challenge and what you can do so that your next long ride will become a success.

So if you are planning a day or a multiple-day ride in the future, here are some great tips!

Listen:
https://equestrianadventuresses.com/2021/04/07/horse-podcast-ep-118-how-far-can-a-horse-travel-in-one-day/

Do You ‘Baby Talk’ to Your Horse? She Hears You

Thehorse.com - Full Article

A new study provides evidence that human speech style can affect equine behavior and that pet-directed speech (aka “baby talk”) improves human-horse communication.

Posted by Robin Foster, PhD, CHBC, Cert. AAB, IAABC | Apr 4, 2021

Do you talk to your horse? If so, your speaking style matters, according to new research by Lea Lansade, PhD, and colleagues from Université de Tours in France. The article, “Horses are sensitive to baby talk: pet‐directed speech facilitates communication with humans in a pointing task and during grooming,” was published in the March 2021 issue of Animal Cognition.

This is the first study to provide evidence that human speech style can affect equine behavior. Lansade was particularly interested in the use of pet-directed speech (PDS) with horses. PDS has the same sound qualities as baby talk (also called infant-directed speech [IDS], Motherese, and Parentese). This style of speaking has a distinctive vocal signature, with a high pitch and slow rate.

PDS captures a horse’s attention and improves human-horse communication The research began with a social media survey. Most horse owners who responded to the survey claimed to talk to their horse using PDS, but fewer than half thought the horse was actually sensitive to it. The researchers then conducted two experiments with 20 Welsh mares comparing the effects of PDS and adult-directed speech (ADS). They found that:...

Read more here:
Thehorse.com

Monday, April 12, 2021

Gut Bacteria “Talk” to Horse’s Cells to Extend Energy Output, Improve Their Athletic Performance

SciTechDaily.com - Full Article

By FRONTIERS
APRIL 7, 2021

Study linking gut bacteria to more efficient energy generation in the cells of horses paves the way for dietary supplements that enhance their performance.

A horse’s gut microbiome communicates with its host by sending chemical signals to its cells, which has the effect of helping the horse to extend its energy output, finds a new study published in Frontiers in Molecular Biosciences. This exciting discovery paves the way for dietary supplements that could enhance equine athletic performance.

“We are one of the first to demonstrate that certain types of equine gut bacteria produce chemical signals that communicate with the mitochondria in the horse’s cells that regulate and generate energy,” says Eric Barrey, author of this study and the Integrative Biology and Equine Genetics team leader at the National Research Institute for Agriculture, Food and Environment, France. “We believe that metabolites — small molecules created by breaking down bigger molecules for food or growth — produced by these bacteria have the effect of delaying low blood sugar and inflammation in the cells, which in turn extends the horse’s athletic performance...”

Read more here: https://scitechdaily.com/gut-bacteria-talk-to-horses-cells-to-extend-energy-output-improve-their-athletic-performance/

Thursday, April 08, 2021

Long Riding with Nevada Discovery Ride

RideClimb.com Podcast - Listen

April 7, 2021
by Jess

Have you ever wished a trail ride wouldn’t end? Then, you may want to consider long riding; which is simply long distance travel on horseback. It’s not competitive, it’s not timed, and there are no limits. It’s just an adventure.

My guest today is long rider, Samantha Szesciorka. She has completed two journeys across Nevada and she’s about to embark on her third. On her first long ride in 2013, Sam rode 500 miles across Nevada from Baker in the east to Reno in the west...

Read more and listen:
https://rideclimb.com/podcast/long-riding-with-nevada-discovery-ride/

Wild at Heart: Trekking Across Australia with the Brumbies

(Cat Vinton photo)
Horse-Canada.com - Full Article

Armed only with her wits and a GPS connected to a support team, French author Aliénor le Gouvello tackled the infamous 5,330 km trail.

By: Kim Izzo | April 7, 2021

When French expat Aliénor le Gouvello encountered semi-wild Brumbies in the Australian outback, she was immediately obsessed. An animal fiercely loved by some and considered a scourge by others, Brumbies have a complicated place in Australian culture and history. Inspired to celebrate their character, le Gouvello tamed three brumbies ‒ Roxanne, River and Cooper ‒ and teamed up with them to take on the physical and mental challenges of the Bicentennial National Trail, Australia’s longest trek, which passes through 18 of Australia’s national parks and more than 50 state forests...

Read more here:
https://horse-canada.com/magazine/profiles/wild-heart-trekking-across-australia-with-brumbies/

Wednesday, April 07, 2021

Life After Racing giving retired racehorses a new career in UAE

Khaleejtimes.com - Full Article

Tamanna Sajeed/Dubai
Filed on April 6, 2021

The league aims to encourage ex-racehorses and their riders to compete in new disciplines, and runs till April 30, 2021

The UAE’s world-class racing scene has been bringing joy to equestrians for decades. Now a UAE-based non-profit organisation aims to do the same for the racehorses that once illuminated the iconic Meydan racecourse.

Life After Racing was launched on February 15, 2021, by Dubai-based expats Debbie Armaly and her co-founders Sophie Dyball and Karen Stewart. The league aims to encourage ex-racehorses and their riders to compete in new disciplines, and runs till April 30, 2021.

“They can go on to compete in new disciplines… show jumping, dressage, cross-country, or just a general happy hacker - they don’t have to compete in their new lives,” says Armaly, a syndicate member of the Emirates Entertainment Racing Club who has been rehoming ex-racehorses from the UAE for over a decade.

She has rehomed horses such as Prince Shaun, Los Barbados, My Catch and Shamaal Nibras who have all ran on the World Cup night in previous years...

Read more here:
https://www.khaleejtimes.com/sport/horse-racing/life-after-racing-giving-retired-racehorses-a-new-career-in-uae

Monday, April 05, 2021

Your Horse Needs Forage Even at Night

TheHorse.com - Full Article

More than four hours without feed is fasting for a horse and can lead to issues. The solution for evening feeding? Slow feeders extended nighttime “grazing” time by 95-105%, researchers observed.

Posted by Christa Lesté-Lasserre, MA | Sep 9, 2019

Night falls, and it’s time for bed. Your horse has had his last hay meal of the day and is comfortably in his freshly cleaned stall for a good night’s sleep. All’s well, right?

Actually, if you’ve fed loose hay, you might be the only one enjoying a comfortable evening. According to Irish and Scottish researchers, horses can consume loose haylage quickly and end up waiting so many hours before their morning meal that it could affect their health.

“Recent recommendations highlight that when horses go more than four hours without food, they’re technically fasting,” said Barbara Hardman, a postgraduate MSc from the University of Edinburgh’s Royal (Dick) School of Veterinary Studies, in Scotland. “Foraging (the behavior of consuming forage) is a ‘highly motivated’ behavior for horses, meaning that it’s critical that they perform it for not only their gut health but their mental health, as well...”

Read more here:
https://thehorse.com/178397/your-horse-needs-forage-even-at-night/?utm_medium=Reader+Favorites+enews&utm_source=Newsletter

Friday, April 02, 2021

Barn Owls and Horses: Nature’s Mousetrap

Thehorse.com - Full Article

A barn owl family will consume nearly 2,000 mice or other rodents in just a couple of months. The good news for you is all it requires is the installation of a simple nest box—and the right habitat for their prey.

Posted by Alayne Blickle | Mar 13, 2021

The mouse situation in your horse barn is getting out of control. You know mice can carry diseases, some serious to humans. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, mice and rats can directly or indirectly transmit 20 diseases worldwide. Several of these, such as leptospirosis and salmonellosis, affect horses, as well. And what about the moles and gophers in your pasture making a mess of things with their telltale little piles of dirt and “ankle-breaking” holes?

Rodents are probably one of the toughest issues to deal with on horse properties. They’re small, stealthy, and primarily active after dark when we can’t see them. So how do you reduce the populations of these persistent little things without lethal trapping or using chemicals that are deadly to other animals in the ecosystem, including dogs and cats?...

Read more here:
https://thehorse.com/198007/barn-owls-and-horses-natures-mousetrap/?utm_medium=Farm%20barn%20enews&utm_source=Newsletter

Thursday, April 01, 2021

Proud Flesh and How to Prevent it

USRider.org - Full Article

By Horse & Rider | 2/1/2016

What Proud Flesh Is:

As your horse's wound begins to heal, pinkish granulation tissue fills in the gaps between soft tissues. Granulation tissue normally stops forming as the skin edges grow together to close the wound. But when healing doesn't go according to plan, the granulation tissue becomes exuberant-it keeps growing until it bulges above skin level, so newly formed skin can't grow over the wound. That's proud flesh.

When Proud Flesh happens:

Proud flesh tends to form in wounds below your horse's knees and hocks, where there's little soft tissue between skin and bone, and where movement constantly tugs the wound's edges. It's most likely to occur in places with lots of movement, such as over joints, or when a complication, such as infection, slows healing.

How to prevent Proud Flesh:...

Read more here:
https://www.usrider.org/article/proud-flesh-prevent-31258-41?utm_campaign=USR%20-%20IP%20-%20Health%20Tip&utm_medium=email&_hsmi=115542369&_hsenc=p2ANqtz-8bS__le5ohZsC5NkoVJyMAmblUa3dIKY2vHOMaKchJAI96WHC30rTq9AtqfoJ_zddkzvrhuxQqYAtBomberrXhB8LCZw&utm_content=115542369&utm_source=hs_email

Tuesday, March 30, 2021

Mule who led hikers to injured owner found after disappearing in Estacada park

OregonLive.com - Full Story

Updated Mar 30, 9:15 AM; Posted Mar 29, 8:00 AM

By Jayati Ramakrishnan | The Oregonian/OregonLive

UPDATE #1 (3/29): Oregon Parks and Recreation Department spokesperson Chris Havel said the mule was found around 7:30 a.m. Monday.

UPDATE #2 (3/29): Hickory the mule is back home after leading hikers to injured owner, then disappearing into forest

----

On Sunday, a mule led a pair of hikers through a Clackamas County state park to the spot where its injured owner had fallen earlier in the afternoon.

Then it disappeared into the forest.

The Clackamas County Sheriff’s Office said a 60-year-old man, whom they have not publicly identified, was riding his mule on trails at Milo McIver State Park, when they believe he fell off and hurt himself.

The mule began walking alone on the trail until it found two people hiking, said Sgt. Marcus Mendoza, then led them back to the injured man.

One of the hikers who found the mule, Doug Calvert, said he and his wife were on foot on a popular equestrian trail around noon when they saw what they thought was a horse walking toward them.

As they got closer, they realized the animal was a mule, and it was alone and watching them.

“It kept stopping and looking back to make sure we were following it,” Calvert said...

Read more here:
https://www.oregonlive.com/clackamascounty

Monday, March 29, 2021

Building a Better Helmet: MIPS and Why it Matters

HorseSport.com - Full Article

Why this design technology is so important and how research is working to make us safer ‒ plus we bust a few helmet myths along the way.

By: Alison King | March 26, 2021

If you’ve purchased a new helmet in the past couple of years, chances are you’re already aware of MIPS technology. If not, read on and we’ll explain what MIPS is and why it’s so important ‒ while busting a few helmet myths along the way. What is MIPS?

MIPS stands for Multi-Directional Impact Protection System, and that’s exactly what it is – a design technology that allows helmets to provide more protection to the wearer in the case of an impact or fall. While MIPS has been widely used in sports such as cycling, downhill skiing, and snowboarding for years, it’s a relatively new addition to equestrian helmets. How does it work?

During an angled impact, rotational motion causes damage to the brain, often resulting in a concussion or more serious TBI (traumatic brain injury). The MIPS magic lies in a thin layer of foam added to the inside of a helmet. This low-friction layer, as it’s called, is designed to move inside the helmet shell to provide a shearing effect. The liner – and the wearer’s head – can slide 10 to 15mm relative to the helmet shell in all directions, dissipating the energy from a fall or an impact away from the brain.

Traditional helmets are designed to protect the skull in the case of a linear impact – a fall straight down onto the head. The hard helmet shell is tested for its ability to withstand an impact and prevent a rock or other hard object from penetrating that shell and reaching the skull. However, they are not designed to prevent the forces generated by a fall or impact from being absorbed by the brain, nor are they tested for performance when the impact is on an angle – a much more realistic simulation of a fall from a horse...

Read more here:
https://horsesport.com/magazine/rider-health/building-better-helmet-mips-why-matters/

Tuesday, March 23, 2021

Equestrian Adventuresses Horse Podcast Ep 111: Long Distance Riding Passion – Crossing Europe on Horseback

EquestrianAdventuresses.com - Listen

by utetonia
March 19, 2021

In today’s episode, Ute talks with Cathleen Leonard, Equestrian Adventuress and long distance rider from England. Cathleen has traveled across Great Britain and Ireland with her two rescue draft horses, her Warmblood cross and her dog. She tells us all about her difficult beginnings, how she nearly gave up on long distance riding and how she finally succeeded in realizing her dream of doing an epic ride from Scotland to Cornwall. Today Cathleen is an experienced long-distance rider and has written and published two books about her journeys.

However, her biggest adventure is yet to come: Crossing Europe from West to East on Horseback, riding from Portugal to Romania with horses horses, her dog, her partner and a little, one-eyed mule. Currently marooned in Portugal due to the Corona lockdown, she is not deterred and has done a ride cross Portugal in autumn and winter and now hopes to set out towards Romania this spring.

Listen:
https://equestrianadventuresses.com/2021/03/19/horse-podcast-ep-111-long-distance-riding-passion-crossing-europe-on-horseback/

Sunday, March 21, 2021

2021 AERC Convention Notes: Nick Warhol on What Makes a Great Endurance Horse, and How Do You Get One?

TheSweatyEquestrian.com - Full Article

3/17/2021
by Tamara Baysinger

You know Nick Warhol, right? Over 13,000 miles in 13 years of endurance, 30-plus 100-milers, ride manager, former AERC board member, and storyteller. Yeah, you know the guy. His talk at the 2021 AERC Convention was worth the price of admission. (You can still access all the Convention sessions through the end of March!)

Warhol began with a disclaimer: All opinions are his and could be argued by others.

I reckon that’s true of anyone trying to sort out what makes a great endurance horse. We all agree on good feet, correct conformation, and all that…but Warhol’s focus went more than bone deep: His #1 most important trait for an endurance horse: its mind.

Warhol listed a variety of mental attributes of a good endurance horse, noting that some are trainable, and others are not. Here’s his list:...

Read more here:
https://www.thesweatyequestrian.com/sweatyequestrianblog/2021-aerc-convention-notes-nick-warhol-on-what-makes-a-great-endurance-horse-and-how-do-you-get-one

Saturday, March 20, 2021

Happy Trails Podcast: Traveling with Horses Full Time

RideClimb.com Podcast - Listen

March 4, 2021
by Jess

In this episode, Jess talks about her lifestyle as a digital nomad with horses. She talks about how and why she chose this life. She details her travels of the first year and the lessons she learned along the way.

Jess is then joined by Michelle Murphy and her daughter, Scout. This mother/daughter team travels the country full time with three horses and two dogs. They have designed their life to satisfy their passion for travel and exploration. Michelle shares that when they lived in Massachusetts, Scout battled with anxiety. Their intent in leaving was to escape the pressures of societal norms and live a stress-free life.

Scout and Joker navigating a tricky trail

Scout and Michelle have been traveling for two years. Scout enjoys her unique lifestyle. She learns through experience and has the freedom to pursue her interests. Artistic expression is very important to her. She paints regularly and has written her first book, A Magical Friendship Journey. It is the story of a band of thrown away misfits who come together to form a special family...

Listen:
https://rideclimb.com/podcast/traveling-with-horses-full-time/

Rochelle's ride to commemorate Australian pioneer women

YoungWitness.com.au - Full Article

March 18 2021
Peter Guthrie

A librarian from Gundagai who is reenacting journeys by Australian pioneer women will begin the first of six treks in Young this weekend.

Rochelle Grey will travel with her two horses, Frodo, a 10-year-old grey Australian stock horse, Zee, a 16-year-old chestnut quarter horse, and border collie Rowdy.

The first journey, beginning Saturday, will commemorate Sarah Musgrave, the first European child born west of the Great Divide, who rode 90 miles through bushranger-infested bushland to attend her own wedding in 1853.

"I love Sarah's story - she was clearly a girl of enormous capacity, courage, and endurance. The route of the journey will pass through Young, Wombat, Harden, Galong, Binalong and Yass, over nine days," Rochelle said...

Read more here:
https://www.youngwitness.com.au/story/7170766/rochelles-ride-to-commemorate-australian-pioneer-women/

Thursday, March 18, 2021

Trail Etiquette - What to Do with Horse Poo

Americantrails.org - Full Article

Lora Goerlich, American Trails contributor and equestrian expert, shares trail etiquette around horse manure.

by Lora Goerlich

Trail apples - the organic, naturally beneficial, digested balls of vegetation that host nourishing insect meals for birds and game fowl while also providing valuable minerals for butterflies, moths and dragonflies. On unimproved trail tread, manure will break down in about two weeks with a little help from sun, rain, dung beetles and foraging birds. AND unlike tacky, foul-smelling human or dog feces (which are more frequently found trailside) horse manure is not considered hazardous or toxic and carries no pathogens of concern[1].

Manure on trails, at staging areas and camp sites is unavoidable. Knowing when to take it or leave it can be confusing for both equestrians and non-equestrians. Additionally, park agencies may not understand what to expect from riders and haven’t established or posted clear guidelines. Unless otherwise posted, the standards listed below are appropriate expectations for riders:...

Read more here:
https://www.americantrails.org/resources/trail-etiquette-what-to-do-with-horse-poo?x-craft-preview=MHhkFU2jyy&token=aW_Erh3gbSyVlTl8ELrcoVVb1ruM5dbm

Wednesday, March 17, 2021

Horse Hoofwear Innovations

TheHorse.com - Full Article

Today’s hoof protection options include a variety of glue-on shoes, hoof boots, and even orthotics. Learn about the pros and cons of each.

Posted by Heather Smith Thomas | Mar 10, 2021

Today’s hoof protection options include a variety of glue-on shoes, hoof boots, and even orthotics Far more shoeing and hoof care materials and products are available today than 20 or 30 years ago, and horses are the beneficiaries. No longer are farriers limited to just steel shoes and nails.

“At the first farrier conference I attended, in 1988, one topic of discussion was whether glue-on shoes would ever be possible,” says Pat Reilly, chief of farrier services at the University of Pennsylvania’s New Bolton Center School of Veterinary Medicine, in Kennett Square. “Now glue-on shoes are commonplace; it’s amazing that we’ve made that much progress in my professional lifetime...”

Read more here:
https://thehorse.com/185720/horse-hoofwear-innovations/?utm_medium=Lameness+enews&utm_source=Newsletter

Sunday, March 14, 2021

2021 AERC Convention Notes: Dr. Melissa Ribley on Riding in Different Conditions

TheSweatyEquestrian.com - Full Article

3/11/2021
by Tamara Baysinger

I always enjoy presentations by Melissa Ribley, DVM. Her talk at the AERC Unconventional Convention on March 6, 2021, was especially effective in sharing her passion for traveling to endurance rides all across the country. My notes capture the highlights, but there's no substitute for the full video, now available from AERC through the end of the month.

Dr. Ribley is an extremely experienced endurance vet and rider. Not only does her AERC record span well over 20,000 miles, it also reflects her love of traveling with her horses. Competing in different regions means implementing good hauling practices and being prepared for all types of climate and terrain. Dr. Ribley shared tips on all counts.

Five Reasons to Ride Out-of-Region

Dr. Ribley started by sharing ​some enticing reasons to explore endurance rides in other regions:...

Read more here:
https://www.thesweatyequestrian.com/sweatyequestrianblog/2021-aerc-convention-notes-dr-melissa-ribley-on-riding-in-different-conditions

Don’t Let Your Horse Hay Go Up in Flames

Thehorse.com - Full Article

Learn how to avoid combustion and barn fire caused by your stored hay.

Posted by Clair Thunes, PhD | Jan 25, 2021

Q: A friend recently told me that stored hay can self-combust. I’d never heard of this before. I keep my hay in my horses’ barn, above the stalls, and now I’m terrified it’s going to catch fire! Should I be concerned, and how can I store hay and keep my horses safe?

A: It is, indeed, true that under certain conditions, hay can self-combust. In fact, it’s a major cause of barn fires along with electrical malfunction, poor housekeeping, and careless work habits.

The No. 1 cause of hay self-combustion is that it was put-up (stored) with too high of a moisture content. Whether you should be concerned will depend on the conditions under which your hay was baled...

Read more here:
https://thehorse.com/110861/dont-let-your-horse-hay-go-up-in-flames/?utm_medium=Farm+barn+enews&utm_source=Newsletter

Wednesday, March 10, 2021

2021 AERC Convention Notes: Dr. Langdon Fielding on Electrolyte Problems in Endurance Horses

TheSweatyEquestrian.com - Full Article

by Tamara Baysinger
3/9/2021

I love seminar notes. Rarely can I take the time to go back and watch an entire presentation, but I do re-read my scribbles for a refresher on the key points. I hope that sharing them here will be helpful to you as well.

Of course, I can’t possibly share all the details from this stellar session by Langdon Fielding, DVM, MBA, DAVECC, DACVSMR, and self-proclaimed electrolyte fanatic. To really take advantage of his generosity, register with AERC to access the 2021 Unconventional Convention content, which will be available through the end of March 2021.

Sodium in Endurance Horses

Dr. Fielding began by sharing a typical lab panel taken from an “Ain’t Doin’ Right” horse at an endurance ride. The panel showed higher than normal sodium and lower than normal potassium, chloride, and calcium. He posed the question: Is the problem here too much sodium or too little water? This horse’s sodium was high. How did it get that way? Either he was given too many electrolytes, or he lost more water through sweat then he replaced by drinking. He may also have been dehydrated before the start.

If the horse’s lab panel had shown low sodium levels instead, Dr. Fielding would have been asking if we didn’t administer enough electrolytes, or if the horse actually drank too much. He observed that although it is possible (such as after a tough haul), horses rarely begin rides deficient in electrolytes...

Read more here:
https://www.thesweatyequestrian.com/sweatyequestrianblog/2021-aerc-convention-notes-dr-langdon-fielding-on-electrolyte-problems-in-endurance-horses

Monday, March 08, 2021

2021 AERC Convention Notes: Dr. Stephanie Seheult on How Your Body Works with Your Horse

TheSweatyEquestrian.com - Full Article

by Tamara Baysinger
3/6/2021

Was anybody else thrilled to see that both days of AERC’s 2021 Unconventional Convention start with a focus on rider fitness? It seems to me that interest in this topic has increased recently. Maybe it’s not my imagination!

Dr. Stephanie Seheult kicked things off with a session entitled “How Your Body Works with Your Horse." Dr. Seheult is a Doctor of Physical Therapy with a Bachelors in Health Science, as well as an active equestrian. Most of her clients at Advanced Physio are also riders.

In her presentation, Dr. Seheult focused on the importance of balance in the pelvis and its surrounding muscles. She noted that, in the saddle, many riders feel one seatbone more than the other. Riders may also sit off to one side.

These imbalances worsen as we fatigue – and that’s no small matter for those of us who ride 25, 50, or more miles at a stretch. Dr. Seheult's focus was on the rider, but of course our imbalances affect our horses as well.

Dr. Seheult described two, common causes of pelvic imbalance:...

Read more here:
https://www.thesweatyequestrian.com/sweatyequestrianblog/2021-aerc-convention-notes-dr-stephanie-seheult-on-how-your-body-works-with-your-horse

Wednesday, March 03, 2021

Bahrain: Hope in the saddle

GulfWeekly.com - Full Article

By Mai Al Khatib-Camille
mai.alkhatib@gulfweekly.com
March 3- March 9, 2021

Equine enthusiast Haya Jamal Isa is building emotional bridges for children with autism in Bahrain through her love of horses.

The 23-year-old soon-to-be-mum has been providing equine therapy, known as ‘hippotherapy’ for autistic youngsters aged three to 12 since February last year, in a bid to help them improve their motor, emotional and sensory sensations that will assist them with daily challenges.

“I wanted to create something new, using my love for horses, to benefit the community,” said Haya who is studying therapeutic riding online from a US Indiana university and working on the project under the guidance of the Bahrain Royal Equestrian Endurance Federation...

Read more here:
http://www.gulfweekly.com/Articles/42241/Hope-in-the-saddle

Friday, February 26, 2021

Breed Profile: The Shagya-Arabian

FEI.org - Full article

26 October 2021
Words by Patricia Salem

We find out more about this sturdy, brave and fast horse...

If you admire the appearance of Arabian horses, be sure to check out the Shagya-Arabian, a related breed that brings new characteristics and versatility to the beloved classic desert horse!

Here’s what you need to know about this speedy, intrepid, and friendly sport horse, equally comfortable clearing jumps, Endurance racing, and wowing judges in the Dressage ring.

Tell us about Shagya-Arabian

The Shagya-Arabian breed was originally developed to create a horse that had the endurance of the Arabian with a heavier build suitable for cavalry work and carriage pulling!

The breed began way back in 1789 at Babolna, Hungary, when the military there combined the bloodlines of top Bedouin Arabians with larger native horses...

Read more here:
https://www.fei.org/stories/lifestyle/my-equestrian-life/breed-profile-shagya-arabian

Wednesday, February 24, 2021

Is There a ‘Right Kind of Salt’ for Horses?

Thehorse.com - Full Article

An equine nutritionist addresses the different types of salt available and how to pick the right one.

Posted by Clair Thunes, PhD | Feb 22, 2021

Q: I know I should give my horse salt every day. Does it matter which kind I choose? A: Providing access to or giving salt every day ensures your horse’s maintenance sodium needs are met, which is vital for hydration. So, the first thing to do is make sure you’re feeding sodium chloride and not Lite Salt, which is a blend with potassium chloride that doesn’t provide as much sodium.

Sodium chloride comes in many forms, from plain white blocks to red mineralized blocks to loose forms of the same, plus iodized, sea salt, kosher salt, Himalayan salt, and others. I believe horses should have salt available at all times when not working, and my preference is a plain white salt block unless your horse prefers the taste of another form...

Read more here:
https://thehorse.com/110471/is-there-a-right-kind-of-salt-for-horses/?utm_medium=Nutrition+enews&utm_source=Newsletter

Monday, February 22, 2021

Endurance Horse Podcast: EPM the Master of Disguise - Part 1 of 3 ‘EPM Stories’

EnduranceHorsePodcast - Listen

Welcome to Episode 41 of Endurance Horse Podcast

EPM - The Master of Disguise - Stories of EPM

Part 1 of a 3 part series

Created by: Christina Hyke
February 12th 2021

Today Jim & I tell you about the most difficult day of my life. The day all horse and pet owners dread, the day you have to say goodbye.

This is a difficult episode, as it is about the loss of our beloved Houdini.

EPM will be the topic of the next three episodes. Part one is dedicated to allowing other horse owners to share with you their personal experiences with diagnosing and the ensuing battle with EPM. Most of them won, some did not...

Listen:
https://endurancehorsepodcast.podbean.com/e/epm-the-master-of-disguise-part-1-of-3-epm-stories/

Saturday, February 13, 2021

Keeping the Horse’s Hindgut Happy

Thehorse.com - Full Article

Getting back to basics and simplifying meals might be the key to keeping the horse’s hindgut healthy and functioning properly. Learn more in this article excerpt from the February 2021 issue of The Horse.

Posted by Katie Navarra | Feb 6, 2021

Horses are powerful, athletic animals. Their digestive systems, however, are delicate compared to those of most other types of livestock. Ruminants such as cattle and sheep have multicompartment stomachs. Saliva created by chewing a cud processes food in the front half of ruminants’ digestive tracts. Horses, however, rely on a metabolically complex fermentation process. And because horses only have one stomach, most of that fermentation occurs in the back part or hindgut.

Despite making up the largest portion of a horse’s gastrointestinal (GI) tract, the hindgut, which includes the cecum and large colon (or large intestine), often receives far less attention from owners than the stomach or small intestine, says Kenneth Kopp, DVM, a consulting veterinarian based in St. Louis, Missouri...

Read more here:
https://thehorse.com/197125/keeping-the-horses-hindgut-happy/?utm_medium=Reader+Favorites+enews&utm_source=Newsletter

Wednesday, February 03, 2021

Veterinarians are Considering Lecithin for Treating and Preventing Ulcers

GettyEquineNutrition.com - Full Article

By Juliet M. Getty, Ph.D.

Your horse has an ulcer? “Give him omeprazole.”

Your horse is traveling on a long trip? “Give him omeprazole.”

Your horse is taking pain medication? “Give him omeprazole.”

Sound familiar?

Omeprazole, produced by Merial as GastroGard® and the less concentrated UlcerGard®, is the go-to drug for all these reasons and more. One of my clients recently said, “The people at my barn feed omeprazole like it’s candy!” Does omeprazole have any benefits?

Yes, particularly for ulcers that are found in the upper squamous region of the stomach that is not protected by a mucus layer. Short term usage is usually not problematic as long as care is taken to wean the horse off of it, lest there be a rebound acid effect.

But usage beyond 4 weeks, or giving your horse omeprazole for other reasons, is not a good idea...

https://gettyequinenutrition.com/pages/veterinarians-are-considering-lecithin-for-treating-and-preventing-ulcers

Tuesday, February 02, 2021

Metabolites could be key to predicting endurance horse success, researchers say

Horsetalk.co.nz - Full Article

February 1, 2021
Horsetalk.co.nz

The metabolitic signatures of Endurance horses could potentially be used to predict their performance in competition, according to researchers.

Researchers in Qatar said performance in Endurance racing depends on the interplay between physiological and metabolic processes.

“However, there is currently no parameter for estimating the readiness of animals for competition.”

Alana Halama and her fellow researchers, reporting in the journal Metabolites, set out to characterize the metabolic consequences of endurance racing and to establish a metabolic performance profile for those animals.

The study team monitored metabolite composition in blood plasma samples from 47 Arabian horses participating in endurance races, using a broad non-targeted metabolomics approach...

Read more here:
https://www.horsetalk.co.nz/2021/02/01/metabolites-endurance-horse-success/

Monday, February 01, 2021

American Horse Publications Launches Fifth Equine Industry Survey, Sponsored by Zoetis

POSTED ON JANUARY 18, 2021 BY CHRISTINE BRUNE

American Horse Publications (AHP) launches its fifth Equine Industry Survey at www.ahpequineindustrysurvey.com. Horse owners who live in the United States, are 18 years of age and older, and who currently own or manage at least

The survey, which is conducted every three years, will gauge participation trends and management practices in the U.S. equine industry, identify critical issues facing the equine industry as perceived by those who own or manage horses, and better understand issues pertaining to horse health.

The online survey is made possible by a sponsorship from Zoetis, the leading animal health company dedicated to improving equine wellness, every day. Zoetis has sponsored the survey since its inception in 2009.

“Zoetis is proud to continue our sponsorship of the AHP Equine Industry Survey,” said Jeannie Jeffery, vice president of the Zoetis U.S. equine business. “We hope that the survey will continue to help identify successes and opportunities for improvement in the equine industry that horse owners, veterinarians and professionals can unite to resolve.”

“AHP is grateful for its partnership with Zoetis to provide ongoing and vital data on the trends in horse care, management, and welfare of horses in the U.S.,” said Christine W. Brune, AHP executive director. “We appreciate the collaborated effort of AHP members and the industry in promoting this survey and will strive to maintain or exceed previous responses in 2021.”

The study is anonymous; this means that no one – not even members of the research team – will be able to associate information that is given with respondents. When the survey results are tallied, only aggregated results will be presented.

The survey sponsor and AHP members who promote the survey will receive complete results of the 2021 survey to release through their own channels up to 60 days prior to release of the survey results to the AHP membership. The general equine industry may request a summary of this new information by contacting the AHP office at ahorsepubs@aol.com in October 2021.

Horse owners and enthusiasts are invited to promote the survey by sharing this link with horse-owner groups and individual horse owners. The more information we collect, the better we make our world for horses.

The 2021 AHP Equine Industry Survey is being conducted by American Horse Publications (AHP). Dr. C. Jill Stowe is providing consulting services for data collection and analysis to the AHP. Dr. Stowe is currently an associate professor of Agricultural Economics at the University of Kentucky.

Friday, January 29, 2021

Horse Podcast Ep 89: The Great Trek – Riding Across the USA

EquestrianAdventuresses.com Podcast - Listen

Posted byutetonia
January 27, 2021

On today’s episode, Ute talks with Kathleen Schmitt, Equestrian Adventuress of the first hour. After finishing her education including horsemanship training in England and Germany, Kathleen headed off to her personal adventure of a lifetime. She crossed the USA from coast to coast on the back of her Arabian part-bred Murphy accompanied by her dog Country Boy who went along as her protector. This ride took place in 1981, a time without internet, mobile phones or hand-held GPS devises. Kathleen only had an unreliable map and a direction: West! She was on trail for seven months, crossing mountains, plains and deserts. She met countless people on the ride, got lost ever so often and finally published a book about her ride recently. We talk about her ride, about her book and why it took her such a long time to write it.

Listen:
https://equestrianadventuresses.com/2021/01/27/horse-podcast-ep-89-the-great-trek-riding-across-the-usa/

Wednesday, January 20, 2021

Gaited Horse Versatility – Myths or Facts?

WeRide-magazine.com - Full Article

By Lisa Bialy

Because there is so much misinformation out there about the smooth gaited horse breeds, I have collected and compiled a list of “myths” and “facts” with respect to the versatility of the gaited horse. Sadly, there are so many myths and I’m sure I did not cover every one of them! My facts are based on research and also from personal experience. Over the past 16 years, I have owned several gaited breeds, including Walking Horses, Peruvian Horses, Foxtrotters and Rocky Mountain Horses. I have worked with several excellent trainers (gaited and non-gaited), from dressage and eventing to Western Vaquero style. I have raised and trained several of my own Peruvian and Walking Horses, and have rehabbed rescues, including some ex-biglick Walking Horses. While I mostly trail ride, I enjoy doing about everything from parades to musical performances, obstacle and ranch work, some liberty work, dressage and endurance. I am passionate about learning everything I can about these awesome horses!

Okay, here we go!!...

Read more here:
https://weride-magazine.com/2021/01/16/gaited-horse-versatility-myths-or-facts/

Thursday, January 14, 2021

Vet Check, Halfway Across the Country

HorseNetwork.com - Full Article

Rebecca Didier
January 12, 2021

There aren’t many of us who will ride a horse clear across the country, but in 1982, before GPS and cell phones, Melissa Chapman did it. On her own with just her horse and her dog for company, Melissa depended on the kindness of strangers to help her complete her journey. In this excerpt from her memoir, Distant Skies: An American Journey on Horseback, we see how a sudden sickness led to a chance meeting that would impact her adventure in more ways than one.

***

The sun burned high and hot when I stopped Rainy in the shadow cast by a large billboard along the side of the two lanes of Route 54. Rainy snatched at the green grass growing thick there, the reins lying loose on his neck. Gypsy’s tongue hung out as she stretched in front of me on the saddle. Me, I just stared, in wonder you could say, up at the great sunflower welcoming us to Kansas.

Halfway.

We were halfway across the country...

Read more here:
https://horsenetwork.com/2021/01/vet-check-halfway-across-the-country/?utm_source=Horse+Network+Email+List&utm_campaign=e0e47b5cc2-jan_14_2020&utm_medium=email&utm_term=0_5694ca6b0c-e0e47b5cc2-84641243&goal=0_5694ca6b0c-e0e47b5cc2-84641243&mc_cid=e0e47b5cc2&mc_eid=b3c9897994

Wednesday, January 13, 2021

Keeping Water Troughs Thawed With or Without a Heater

Thehorse.com - Full Article

Our equine nutritionist offers tips and asks for your input on dealing with ice in horse watering tanks.

Posted by Clair Thunes, PhD | Jan 9, 2021

Q. Winter has barely started, and I’m already tired of breaking ice in my horses’ water trough. Is there anything I can do to help stop the water from freezing other than some kind of water heater?

—Via e-mail

A. We all know how important it is for our horses to have ready access to water, but this can pose challenges when temperatures fall below freezing and you’re unable to use a water heater. It’s a lot of, literally, digit-numbing work and sometimes near impossible to break the ice when temperatures fall. There are some things you can try that might help. However, keep in mind that many of these are less effective as temperatures decrease...

Read more here:
https://thehorse.com/137146/keeping-water-troughs-thawed-with-or-without-a-heater/?utm_medium=Nutrition+enews&utm_source=Newsletter

Monday, January 11, 2021

How much does it cost to travel full time with horses?

RideClimb.com - Full Article

January 9, 2021
by Jess

Jess and Byron trail riding in Montana

We’ve been living in an RV and traveling with our horses since June 2018. The most common question we receive about our lives as digital nomads is how we afford it. This is usually asked with a tone of astonishment. People can’t believe that it’s possible to travel full time and not break the bank; with horses nonetheless! In my opinion it’s not that hard when compared to owning a home, raising children, etc. I’ll explain how we do it. How we make money

At this time our income comes entirely from Gunks Apps, a digital rock climbing guidebook platform that Byron and his partner Christian started in 2014. The income from this venture is very small but it continues to grow. We hope that it might one day sustain us completely...

Read more here:
https://rideclimb.com/how-much-does-it-cost-to-travel-full-time-with-horses/

Medical Grade Honey prevents surgical site infections

EquineScienceUpdate.blogspot.com - Full Article

Thursday, December 24, 2020

Medical Grade Honey prevents surgical site infections

Abdominal surgery is a major undertaking in horses, and not without significant risks to the patient. Colic operations, especially those that involve opening the gut wall, risk contaminating the wound with bacteria such that surgical site infection (SSI) is a potential complication.

Medical grade honey (MGH) has been used successfully to treat established infections in both humans and animals, and has been shown to improve wound healing of equine lacerations and significantly reduce infection rate.

Would the application of MGH help abdominal surgical wounds to heal?

A study by Gustafsson and colleagues investigated whether medical grade honey gel, applied on the linea alba during wound closure, would decrease the prevalence of incisional infections in horses undergoing colic surgery...

Read more here:
https://equinescienceupdate.blogspot.com/2020/12/medical-grade-honey-prevents-surgical.html

Friday, January 08, 2021

Keeping Rodents Out of Your Feed Room

Thehorse.com - Full article

Rats and mice spread disease and ruin horse feed. Learn how to reduce populations in your barn.

Posted by Clair Thunes, PhD | Jan 4, 2021

As an equine nutritionist who visits lots of feed rooms, I come in to contact with my fair share of rodents. At one large facility that backed a stream I came within three feet of several large rats snacking in the feed room. I didn’t seem to bother them at all, and the barn cat who was sunning himself in the doorway seemed to have decided they had him out numbered. With cold weather coming and native food sources becoming scarce, the attraction of food and bedding provided by our feed and tack rooms makes these unwanted guests almost a given. However, there are several important reasons why you should not accept the presence of these critters in your feed rooms...

Read more here:
https://thehorse.com/136721/keeping-rodents-out-of-your-feed-room/?utm_source=ActiveCampaign&utm_medium=email&utm_content=Equestrian+Home+D%C3%A9cor+%7C+Horse+Plays+Dead+%7C+Dani+the+BreyerFest+Horse+%7C+Turning+Soap+into+Ponies&utm_campaign=HC_Enewsletter2019-Wednesday+Jan+6+2021

Wednesday, January 06, 2021

Give Colic the Cold Shoulder This Winter

KER.com - Full Article

January 8, 2020
By Kentucky Equine Research Staff

Colic can strike at any time of the day, month, or year, but impaction colic occurs more frequently in winter. Decreased water intake usually carries the blame for these impactions, defined as a blockage in the large colon caused by any feedstuff undergoing digestion, though other management factors also contribute to the problem.

“Horses require approximately 5 to 15 gallons (20-55 liters) of water per day. Signs of inadequate water intake include production of dry, sparse feces and weight loss,” described Catherine Whitehouse, M.S., a nutrition advisor for Kentucky Equine Research.

Forage fermentation requires voluminous water, which is why the large colon and cecum are referred to as fermentation vats. Insufficient water intake forces the body to borrow water from the hindgut, which subsequently hinders the fermentation process and puts horses at risk for impactions...

Read more here:
https://ker.com/equinews/give-colic-the-cold-shoulder-this-winter/?highlight=give%20colic%20the%20cold%20shoulder%20this%20winter

Monday, January 04, 2021

Cold Weather Horse Colic

Thehorse.com - Full Article

With cold weather comes complicating factors that could increase horses’ colic risk.

Posted by Scott Leibsle, DVM | Nov 14, 2016

Well here we are again … winter! The average horse owner is likely well-acquainted with his or her horse’s colic risk regardless of the season, but with cold weather come complicating factors that all owners should prepare for.

The No. 1 cause of colic during winter is a lack of fresh, unfrozen water. Horses must drink 10-12 gallons of fresh water every day and can dehydrate quickly if water is unavailable. Horses that aren’t getting enough water are at a greater risk for conditions such as simple indigestion or impaction. A frozen water trough is the usual dehydration culprit, but occasionally horses choose to not drink water simply because it is so cold. Heaters for your troughs and buckets are therefore an absolute “must” to ensure continual access to water in the winter. Keep in mind that electrolyte supplements are not a suitable water substitute and do not mitigate the risk of dehydration. There is nothing wrong with adding (appropriate amounts of) electrolytes to your horse’s diet, but offer them in a separate container, leaving the main water supply clean and fresh. Horses might attempt to eat snow to compensate for some fluid loss, but snow is largely composed of air and will not provide the volume of water necessary to hydrate a 1,000-pound animal...

Read more here:
https://thehorse.com/120625/cold-weather-horse-colic/?utm_medium=Reader+Favorites+enews&utm_source=Newsletter