Sunday, April 23, 2017

Subtle Signs of Improper Saddle Fit

Thehorse.com - Full Article

By Heather Smith Thomas
Apr 16, 2017

Saddle fit is a hot topic. Everyone seems to know someone battling an ill-fitting saddle, if they’re not dealing with it themselves. But first things first: What are some early warning signs that your tack and your horse’s back aren’t meshing?

Clues include dry spots under the saddle after a workout (indicating too much pressure in small areas, inhibiting sweat glands). You might also see hair starting to rub the wrong way or broken off, falling out, or replaced by white hairs due to pressure necrosis (tissue death) or damage to pigment-producing portions of the hair follicles. Wet spots and dry spots indicate saddle pressure isn’t evenly distributed.

“It isn’t always the saddle causing a dry spot,” says Mike Scott, a South Carolina-based equine massage therapist and Master Saddlers Association-certified fitter. “It could be the way the rider is sitting with uneven weight distribution. Or, if the horse is high-headed with its back inverted, there may not be any pressure in certain areas because the back is hollow instead of rounded. There are multiple reasons, but uneven pressure is something to look for...”

Read more here:
http://www.thehorse.com/articles/39069/subtle-signs-of-improper-saddle-fit?utm_source=Newsletter&utm_medium=health-news&utm_campaign=04-18-2017

Friday, April 21, 2017

AHC Urges Horse Community to Take Part in USDA Agricultural Census

Horsecouncil.org

The U.S. Department of Agriculture’s (USDA) National Agricultural Statistics Service (NASS) is preparing to conduct its 2017 USDA Census of Agriculture. Horses will be included in the Census. Every five years, USDA-NASS conducts an agriculture census to determine the number of U.S. farms and ranches and gather vital information about U.S agriculture, including the horse community. The census is a valuable tool to help the USDA determine land use and ownership, livestock populations, operator characteristics, production practices, farm income as well as other important information.

The announcement of the USDA-NASS census comes as the American Horse Council has initiated their 2017 Equine Industry Economic Impact Study. The AHC economic study questionnaire will be finalized this month and begin collecting data in the following weeks. These two separate, yet concurrent studies will provide both the industry and the public with a strong image of the state of the industry in 2017. The AHC strongly encourages everyone who is offered the opportunity to participate in either, or both, of these studies to do so. The economic impact and the census are critical to promoting the horse industry.

The AHC continues to promote the USDA-NASS census due to the critical need for the horse community to be properly accounted for in the federal governments agricultural findings. The information collected by the Census will be used to develop federal and state agricultural policy for the next five years. It’s vital all farms and ranches with horses participate in the census so the USDA, and the nation at large, has accurate information regarding the size and scope of the horse community.

Farm or ranch owners who participated in the last Census in 2012 will automatically be mailed a survey that can be filled in and mailed back. If a farm or ranch was not part of the 2012 Census or has not received a form in the mail, the owner can go to the USDA’s census website http://www.agcensus.usda.gov and clicking on the ‘Make Sure You Are Counted’ button through June.

According to the USDA guidelines for the Census, a farm is any place from which $1,000 or more of agricultural products, including horses, were produced and sold, or normally would have been sold, during the year.

Further information on the 2017 Census of Agriculture can be found on the USDA’s website http://www.agcensus.usda.gov.

Monday, April 17, 2017

The Trouble With Mud

Thehorse.com - Full Article

By Heather Smith Thomas
Apr 9, 2017

When the going gets muddy, the muddy get hoof problems; here's what to look out for.

Horses’ hooves are finicky when it comes to moisture. In arid environments they tend to dry out, and in wet conditions they become too soft. If you had to choose between the two, however, dry would probably be the winner.

Continuous exposure to moisture can cause a long list of hoof problems, ranging from difficult-to-manage soft, sensitive feet that won’t hold their shape or nails, to various types of damage and infections in the capsule and its structures. Then there are the injuries due to slipping and scrambling in deep mud or bad footing, lost bell boots, and pulled-off shoes. In short, keeping horses’ feet sound and healthy can be a difficult challenge when weather is wet and footing precarious...

Read more here:
http://www.thehorse.com/articles/35687/the-trouble-with-mud?utm_source=Newsletter&utm_medium=reader-favorites&utm_campaign=04-14-2017

Thursday, April 13, 2017

Condition Your Horse Like a Pro

Thehorse.com - Full Article

By Nancy S. Loving, DVM
Apr 12, 2017

How to help endurance horses, venters, racehorses, or Western performance horses reach peak fitness

That competitive edge. It might look different for different disciplines, but this intangible has its roots in the same concept: conditioning. In short, conditioning develops the musculoskeletal, neurologic, and cardiovascular systems so they can perform athletic endeavors with the greatest efficiency and the least stress on the body.

In this article we’ll learn how riders from different disciplines condition their horses. While there is no magic recipe fit for all equestrian sports, the basic principles of conditioning remain the same across the board...

The Basics

To get fit for competition, your horse needs to be “legged up,” which entails preparing the musculoskeletal system to withstand a certain amount of impact, speed, and duration of work...

Read more here:
http://www.thehorse.com/articles/39051/condition-your-horse-like-a-pro

Tuesday, April 11, 2017

The 2017 Egyptian Event: For the Love of the Horse

Lexington, KY | Apr 10, 2017

The 37th Annual Egyptian Event will be held June 7-10, 2017 at the beautiful Kentucky Horse Park in Lexington, Kentucky. Entitled For the Love of the Horse, this year’s Event and will celebrate the devotion and dedication that Egyptian Arabian horses have ignited in owners, breeders and enthusiasts throughout history.

Attendees from over 15 countries throughout North & South America, Europe, the Middle East and Australia travel to Lexington each year to enjoy the Event’s world-class competition, festivities, educational activities, camaraderie and of course, the world’s most beautiful horses.

Show chair and Pyramid Society Vice President, Lisa Cifrese states, “The Egyptian Event is the only show of its kind in America dedicated to featuring the world’s top caliber Egyptian Arabian horses. Our members share a deep passion for the rich history and rare bloodlines of these horses, and often state that attending the Event each year is like coming home.”

Competitions and activities scheduled for this year’s Event include: halter and performance classes, championships and awards ceremonies, formal and casual socials, educational seminars, youth & family activities, unique shopping opportunities and auctions, liberty classes, a stick horse class and more. The Event will also feature the ever-popular Egyptian Breeders’ Challenge Auction on Thursday, June 8th, sponsored by DeShazer Arabians and offering breedings to over 30 exquisite Straight Egyptian stallions. On Friday evening, June 9th, attendees will enjoy The Pyramid Society’s annual Gala & Fundraiser at Fasig Tipton. The evening will begin with cocktails and superb dining followed by a live auction of fine art and other unique offerings and closing out the evening with dancing to the exciting sounds of The Body & Soul Band.

Special thanks to The Egyptian Event’s Signature Sponsor, Arabians Ltd. of Waco, Texas for their ongoing support of The Pyramid Society, The Egyptian Event and the Egyptian Arabian horse.

Sincere gratitude also goes to Albaydaa Stud of Egypt as The Pyramid Society’s Emissary Sponsor and provider of this year’s Egyptian Event show trophies and ribbons.

For a complete show schedule and spectator or participant information, visit www.theegyptianevent.com, email: info@pyramidsociety.org or call (859) 231-0771.


The Egyptian Event is hosted each year by The Pyramid Society, the world’s leading international membership organization dedicated to the Egyptian Arabian horse. Founded in 1969, The Society has maintained its mission to promote and advance these unique bloodlines through educational venues, local and regional activities, international representation and an active online community.

For more information, contact:
Carol Aldridge
The Pyramid Society
4067 Iron Works Parkway, Suite 1, Lexington, KY 40511
Ph: (859) 231-0771, Info@pyramidsociety.org, www.pyramidsociety.org

Monday, April 10, 2017

I Bought Him For His Brain …

EnduranceIntrospection.com - Full Story

by Patti Stedman | Apr 10, 2017

This week I am vacationing with my brother’s family in the Outer Banks of North Carolina.
My nieces are almost “up and out” as I like to call it, in their late teens and early twenties, and the youngest two are here, with friends in tow.

I turn 50 this year.

The platitudes I heard in my youth (largely ignored) have come home to roost.

“Youth is wasted on the young.”
“Just wait ’til you’re my age … ”
“If you don’t have your health, you don’t have anything.”

Everything from quips about metabolism, sun exposure, financial security, to notions about taking risks, and the benefits of sleep.
At 50, you are solidly who you are.

I was astounded to hear, over dinner conversation, that one of my niece’s friends had recently tattooed on an arm — “Love yours.” That’s pretty connected and heady insight for a barely twenty-something.

Perhaps this generation won’t be our ruination. (This was something I heard a lot about my own generation from folks in the grandparents’ age-range.)

I take secret joy at the uncanny personality traits I share with my older brother.

Each morning, we are the first to rise, within minutes of each other. We’re quiet and seek coffee, then immediately settle into work, or at the hotel on our way to our destination, do a tap dance of happy feet. We are anxious for the folks who sleep to a more civilized time to join us so we can hit the road.

But don’t rush us if we are on our own timeline.

When he’s in the kitchen cooking, like me, he just wants to be left alone. Help? No, thanks. I stay away. I get it.

Our Dad is just the same. Add one more vote to the “it’s all in the genes” bucket.

I marvel at my nieces. They are witty and sharp and irreverent and so uniquely them.

Our generations are so different. They are attached to their electronic devices in a fierce way, they are acutely aware of their appearance — my peers didn’t have our eyebrows “done” or sit in shops getting pedicures in our teen years — and part of me envies their self-awareness, another mourns their freedom from the burden of self-criticism.

They fight. They are cruel. As I walk on the beach, I contemplate sitting them down, admonishing them for the sharp words and the associated hurt feelings that lie deep after the battle is over. My brother and I were torturous to one another.

But the platitudes would be lost in the generational translation. If I were lucky, they might recall them as they hit my age, so what’s the point? We must make our own mistakes, take our own path, and the comfortable and peaceful ease with which my brother and I share space is a testament to the fact that we do learn, we forgive, we find a restful place to settle in with one another.
We find our lane.

I like walking alone on the beach. There’s something about the sound of the waves, the seeking out of the ‘just right’ texture and firmness of sand. I didn’t have time to paint my toenails before I left. They are bare and plain. The teens’ nails are done, of course, various shades of pastels and pinks and bright colors. I feel unfinished for a few moments as I stroll along, like a woman caught with her hair in a mess in her sweats at the grocery store by someone she’d prefer to impress.

I turn back for our rental house, hoping I’ll be able to spot our beach access stairway from the dozens that look exactly alike.
I find myself following my own footsteps. They are clear and straight and firm, and I recognize instinctively my own despite all the others. The width, the narrowness of the heel, the depth of the push-off, but most of all, I recognize the path chosen. No longer am I thinking of my feet with regard to their decoration, or their unsightly callouses in need of a good pumice stone, but the fact that they have carried me, held me up, propelled me forward (and occasionally off course) for nearly half a century.
The last year or two have been for me, lived in a bit of a fog. For reasons I cannot say, I had to choose a path that left me starting over in a way that I never imagined. It was the right thing to do, I can say that as sure as I can look in a mirror, hard, and tell myself I could begin again. These were both things I did as a mantra of sorts, during days and nights where I was unsure of either. My friends and Richard held space for my temporary insanity. Some battles you wage alone.

It has only been in the last few months that the fog has cleared a bit. I stopped waiting to live until ‘things were better.’
That, of course, was mostly because things had gotten better.

With Ace and Ned, my long-time partners and 100-mile horses retired (Ace due to ringbone; Ned due to growing melanomas), I put it out gently to the universe that I was open to a new horse for me. Sure, Richard had Sarge and Wynne and I was happily riding both, but there is something about a horse of your own. A partner.

As these things happen, I’ve found, horses started to appear. Some rejected outright, some needed a visit.

Enter Iggy. I hope his former owner will forgive me for changing his barn name...

Read more here:
http://enduranceintrospection.com/wp/i-bought-him-for-his-brain/

Friday, April 07, 2017

Carbohydrates Defined

Thehorse.com - Full Article

By Nettie Liburt, MS, PhD, PAS
Mar 29, 2017

Carbohydrates are the main source of dietary energy for horses and are important for fast, quick burning power to blast out of the gate or clear a jump.

What are carbohydrates?

Carbohydrates, also known as saccharides, are made up of sugar molecules and classified as either structural or nonstructural. Structural carbohydrates contribute to the fiber portion of the horse’s diet, while nonstructural carbohydrates (you might have heard them called NSCs) do not.

Monosaccharides contain one sugar molecule (e.g. glucose, fructose, and mannose). Disaccharides contain two sugar molecules (lactose and maltose). Oligosaccharides contain several sugar molecules, of which the most common in horse feeds is fructooligosaccharide. Polysaccharides contain 10 or more sugar molecules, and are more commonly known as starch, cellulose, hemicellulose, and pectin...

Read more here:
http://www.thehorse.com/articles/37925/carbohydrates-defined?utm_source=Newsletter&utm_medium=nutrition&utm_campaign=04-03-2017

Thursday, April 06, 2017

American Military Horses and Mules Remembered Today

NEWS RELEASE

One Hundred Years Ago Today, One Million American Horses and Mules were Joined by American Soldiers in World War One


LEXINGTON, Ky (April 6, 2017) Today the United States commemorates its World War One Centennial, marking the 100th anniversary of its entry into the war, and Brooke USA is officially launching its Horse Heroes program to honor the one million American horses and mules who also served. Brooke USA’s goal is to raise one million dollars this year through its Horse Heroes program – one dollar in memory of each of those American horses and mules, to fund equine welfare programs in some of the poorest countries around the world. See Brooke USA’s special Horse Heroes edition of its newsletter: http://conta.cc/2oa7UKN

***

Brooke USA is a 501(c)(3) charity located at the Kentucky Horse Park in Lexington, which exists solely to support the overseas work of Brooke, the world's largest international equine welfare charity. For more than 80 years, Brooke has been alleviating the suffering of horses, donkeys and mules who work in some of the poorest communities on earth. Brooke's scientifically proven, practical and sustainable solutions to enormous welfare challenges improve the lives of equine animals and the people who depend on them across Africa, Asia, the Middle East and Central America. This year alone, Brooke reached 2 million equines, benefiting 12 million people in the developing world. To learn more, visit BrookeUSA.org.

Cindy Rullman, Brooke USA
859-296-0037
Cindy.Rullman@BrookeUSA.org

Wednesday, April 05, 2017

Novel Equine Deworming Principles, Procedures in the Works

Thehorse.com - Full Article

By Stacey Oke, DVM, MSc
Apr 4, 2017

After the introduction of safe, effective, easy-to-administer chemical dewormers in the 1960s, the equine industry enjoyed the luxury of being able to control equine internal parasites with a simple push of a plunger.

Parasite-related conditions such as colic, diarrhea, poor hair coat, ill-thrift, poor performance, etc. were essentially eradicated. Rotational deworming programs—involving the frequent administration of chemical dewormers with various products—rapidly became the mainstay. Almost hand-in-hand with the use of those dewormers, however, came the age of resistance: Populations of internal parasites that could not be killed by those coveted chemical dewormers.

“Populations of roundworms and small strongyles resistant to chemical dewormers, also called anthelmintics, have been identified in all parts of the world,” explained Martin Nielsen, DVM, PhD, Dipl. EVPC, ACVM, assistant professor at the University of Kentucky’s Gluck Equine Research Center, in Lexington. “This once again puts horses at risk for the development of parasite-related diseases.”

There are only three classes of chemical dewormers (benzimidazoles, tetrahydropyrimidines, and macrocyclic lactones), and parasites have developed either established or developing resistance to all three. Combined with the fact that there are no new chemical dewormers in the pipeline for horses (a process that usually takes a minimum of five years), horses with once-treatable parasite-related health issues are now in the pre-1960s position of having no (or very few at the least) treatment options.

“New, nonchemical deworming options are necessary to continue to control equine internal parasites and optimize horse health, welfare, and quality of life,” said Nielsen...

Read more here:
http://www.thehorse.com/articles/36473/novel-equine-deworming-principles-procedures-in-the-works?utm_source=Newsletter&utm_medium=health-news&utm_campaign=04-04-2017

How to Back a Trailer

MelNewton.com - Full Article

March 28, 2017
Posted by Melinda

Backing a trailer is an essential skill as I was reminded over and over and OVER this year. Whether you have to put your trailer into a back-in only angled parking spot at the barn, make a “U” turn at a T intersection, navigate a tight ride camp, or turn around in your best friends driveway – knowing how to back a trailer is something you can’t afford to put off any longer.

There is 1 simple trick and 2 skills you need to master NOW.

I’m not going to lie. Certain truck/trailer combinations are easier to back and maneuver than others. My standard-cab long bed pick up + trailer was an absolute dream and I could wiggle my three-horse ANYWHERE. The Dodge MEGA cab 4 door turns-like-a-cruise-liner truck paired with any size trailer is an exercise in patience and near misses as I constantly mis-judge the semi-truck like room it needs to maneuver. BUT, the concepts are exactly the same. You are going to have to practice to get a feel of *your* particular rig, but my “trick” and the execution of the 2 basic skills is exactly the same whether you have a goose-neck, bumper pull, long bed, short bed etc.

The Trick
Don’t try to figure out the physics of how the truck is doing X while the trailer is doing Y. Just do this....

Read more here:
http://melnewton.com/2017/how-to-back-a-trailer/