Wednesday, July 17, 2019

Hoof Boots Market Future Forecast Indicates Impressive Growth Rate

TheGuardianTribune.com - Full Article

July 17, 2019
Laxman D

Equestrian Sport is a unique field that is an amalgamation of human athletes and animals working together as a team. Equestrian Sports consist of two disciplines i.e. equestrian and racing. Horse riding or horseback riding refers to the art of vaulting, steeple chasing, driving or riding a horse. As awareness about the sport is increasing, sales of accessories related to horseback riding, such as harness, saddle and hoof boots are also on the rise.

Market Overview:

Professionals who practice horse riding feel that hoof boots are excellent substitutes to the earlier used horseshoes. Hoof boots are often used as a backup either when the farrier is unavailable or in case of a thrown horseshoe or as hoof protection for a barefoot horse. The popularity of hoof boots is increasing in all disciplines of horse riding, particularly in endurance riding and trail riding. With the increasing demand, hoof boots are now available for every kind of horse playing any discipline of horse riding. Hoof boots are extremely necessary for horses that have recently been inducted into the sport, to protect their hoof from getting damaged in the uncomfortable terrains. Additionally, in some hoof boots, equine hoof pads are provided to ensure more comfort and additional support...

Read more here:
https://theguardiantribune.com/hoof-boots-market-future-forecast-indicates-impressive-growth-rate/"

Choosing Salt and Mineral Blocks for Horses

Thehorse.com - Full Article

Choosing between plain white salt blocks, red mineralized blocks, rock salt on ropes, and more can be challenging. Our nutritionist offers advice on the best way to supplement salt in your horse’s diet.

Posted by Clair Thunes, PhD | Jun 24, 2019

Q. I have been researching different types of salt and mineral blocks available for horses. I’m trying to determine if one kind is better than another, but there are quite a few different types! Is there one type I should choose over the others?

A. There are a large number of different types of salt and mineral blocks available at feed stores. Here in California, I most commonly see plain white salt blocks, red mineralized salt blocks, and rock salt on a rope. However, in certain parts of the country, other salt blocks that contain supplemental selenium, cobalt, or sulfur are common, as well.

Despite being visually quite different and having names that suggest significantly different nutritional compositions, all these salt sources have the similarity that they are all predominantly sodium chloride—more than 92% sodium chloride, based on the analysis I found...

Read more here:
https://thehorse.com/155743/choosing-salt-and-mineral-blocks-for-horses/

Sunday, July 14, 2019

Your DIY Camp Kitchen

Trailmeister.com - Full Article

June 14 2019
Your DIY Camp Kitchen Boxes

As published in the June, 2019 issue of Western Mule Magazine
by Robert Eversole

Morning coffee is the highlight of my day. But I don’t want the odors of breakfast to linger in the LQ. I needed a space to store my kitchen equipment, and a convenient area to prepare and cook my meals. I’ve seen lots of chuck / kitchen boxes over the years and they all seemed lacking and terribly expensive. So, I designed my own DIY camp kitchen to fulfill my needs and wants at much less expense.

My Top Requirements:

– In my opinion boxes that are permanently fixed to the sides of trailers are hazardous. I don’t want anything obstructing my rear view when driving. And I just may need that extra few inches when I turn into a parking area. Finding this inside storage space was a bigger challenge than I anticipated. I wanted the boxes to be safely secured when in motion, out of the LQ area, and safely away from the ponies...

Read more here:
https://www.trailmeister.com/your-diy-camp-kitchen/?utm_source=MailingList&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=July+2019+general

Reduce Trailering Stress – Keep Your Cool When Traveling With Horses

Trailmeister.com - Full Article

As Published in the July, 2011, issue of The Northwest Horse Source.
by Robert Eversole

Summer is officially here, and in spite of high fuel prices, trail riders are hitting the highways in large numbers to haul their horses, and mules, to “work” as they travel to that perfect riding destination. In my last article we discussed the fundamentals of trailer maintenance and how to check your equine partner’s travel accommodations for safety. Let’s expand on that topic and talk about how to create an equine friendly environment while we roll over the blacktop. There are several topics to discuss around trailering such as; front or slant load, bumper pull or goose neck, step up or ramp, tie or not tie, and more, but today we’ll narrow our focus and concentrate on two factors; dealing with heat and driving styles. Regardless of how far we haul we’re asking a lot of our horses and we’re creating stress on them in several ways; from the stress of heat to the stresses of being bounced around inside a trailer.

Dealing with heat – Most horses’ comfort range is between 30 to 75 degrees depending upon the breed. While this is a wide temperature range consider the wide range of horse breeds from cold loving Icelandics to thin coated Arabians. They each have adapted to different environments. Now consider the trailer and how hot it can become on a warm sunny (think perfect riding weather) day. Studies have shown that temperatures inside trailers can easily be 10 to 15 degrees greater than outside temperatures. That perfect 80 degree day just became a hot and humid 95 plus degrees inside the trailer. In order to ease heat stress on your animals you can take the following precautions...

Read more here:
https://www.trailmeister.com/reduce-trailering-stress-keep-your-cool-when-traveling-with-horses/?utm_source=MailingList&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=July+2019+general

Saturday, July 13, 2019

Fire destroys part of historic French National Stud

Horseandhound.co.uk - Full Article

Sarah Radford
12 July, 2019 17:04

A fire that broke out overnight on 11-12 July has destroyed part of the historic French National Stud of St Lo (Haras National de Saint-lo).

A statement on the Pole Hippique Saint-lo Facebook page said a rider living on site had spotted the outbreak of the fire in stable block number three at around midnight.

All 22 horses in the block were evacuated safely, with vets reporting no injuries from the blaze.

“Neighbours and professionals from around the stud all mobilised spontaneously and offered their help and the 22 horses were quickly evacuated and put safe before the spread of the fire to stable number four. No one was hurt in the disaster,” the statement said...

Read more here:
https://www.horseandhound.co.uk/news/fire-destroys-part-historic-french-national-stud-691689

Thursday, July 11, 2019

Mountain Bikes on Horse Trails? No Problem if You’re Prepared

Thehorse.com - Full Article

Introduce horses systematically to bikes, hikers, backpackers, strollers, and ATVs to reduce spooking on the trail.

Posted by Robin Foster, PhD, CHBC, Cert. AAB, IAABC | Jul 4, 2019

Few things are more enjoyable than riding through the forest, coming around a bend in the path, and having the sky open to a breathtaking mountain vista. But, today, equestrians are sharing the trail with a growing number of outdoor enthusiasts, and a rider might instead come around a bend in the path to encounter a group of day hikers or off-road cyclists. This has led many rider to seek advice on how to prepare for encounters with mountain bikes on horse trails.
In urban equestrian areas, off-leash dogs and baby buggies are often as common as horses. These unfamiliar, fast-moving, and loud objects can frighten horses, causing them to startle, panic, rear, or bolt.

A few strategies can help prepare your horse for these contemporary trail obstacles and increase safety...

Read more here:
https://thehorse.com/110581/mountain-bikes-on-horse-trails/

FEI Set to Eject the Discipline of Reining at the End of 2019

Horse-canada.com - Full Article

July 9, 2019 | Comments
by: Pippa Cuckson

Reining has just months left as an FEI sport, with news that the General Assembly in November will be asked to “remove” reining from the FEI portfolio from January 1, 2020.

This will be the first time the FEI has ever ejected a discipline – having obtained stronger powers to do so last year.

The writing was on the wall in November 2018 when the FEI ceased its cooperation agreements with the National Reining Horse Association and the American Quarter Horse Association.

Main areas of concern were the three bodies’ diverse opinions over minimum horse ages, stewarding and anti-doping policy, and the “money-driven” approach of NRHA compared with the FEI’s “performance-based” ideals...

Read more here:
https://horse-canada.com/horse-news/fei-set-eject-reining-end-2019/?utm_medium=40digest.7days3.20190710.home&utm_source=email&utm_content=&utm_campaign=campaign

Tuesday, July 09, 2019

Horse Owner Liability Checklist

EquineLegalSolutions.com - Full Article

​Horse ownership is a joy, whether you’re hitting the trails, heading to horse shows, or galloping along a beach. But is potential liability lurking in the shadows, just waiting to ruin the fun? Go through this quick checklist and find out before it’s too late.

If You Own a Horse

√ You have reviewed your insurance policies and are confident you’ll be covered if your horse injures or kills a person or another horse, or causes property damage, no matter where the incident takes place.

Why this matters: If you are sued and don’t have insurance to pay for your legal defense, you could easily spend tens of thousands of dollars to defend yourself, with no hope of getting your money back, even if you ultimately prevail in the lawsuit.

If You Let Friends or Family Ride or Handle Your Horses

√ You have a good-quality liability release designed for letting friends and family ride and handle your horses, and you have them sign it before they come anywhere near your horses. And if any friends or family members are under 18, you have their parent or guardian sign a liability release that includes an indemnification provision.

Why this matters: While you’d certainly like to think your friends and family wouldn’t sue you if your horses injured them, you won’t really know for certain until and unless it happens...

Read more at:
https://www.equinelegalsolutions.com/horse-owner-liability-checklist.html

Monday, July 08, 2019

Study Confirms Horses ‘Talk’ to Human Handlers

Thehorse.com - Full Article

New research has revealed that horses do, in fact, try to intentionally communicate with us to achieve certain goals.

Posted by Christa Lesté-Lasserre, MA | Jun 9, 2016

“Hey! See that bucket of feed over there? Yeah, that one. Can you grab that for me, please? I’m kind of hungry.”
Wait a minute. Did your horse just speak to you? Actually, he might have—in his own way, of course. New research by European scientists has revealed that horses do, in fact, try to intentionally communicate with us to achieve certain goals.

In their pioneering study, researchers have determined for the first time that horses are capable of heterospecific referential communication—essentially, the ability to communicate about something, specifically to someone else. More precisely, to us.

So does that mean our horses actually “talk” to us?...

Read more here:
https://thehorse.com/17891/study-confirms-horses-talk-to-human-handlers/

Saturday, July 06, 2019

Create a Trail Riding Survival Kit

EquusMagazine.com - Full Article

Whether you're riding familiar trails or exploring new territory, a trail survival kit can help you handle emergencies.

CHRISTINE BARAKAT
JUN 21, 2019

So you're not the rugged, survivalist type. You're not alone. It's a fact of 21st century life that fewer and fewer people are experienced in surviving in the great outdoors. Moseying on horseback through the local park on a sunny Saturday may be the closest some of us ever get to a wilderness adventure.

Yet even on a familiar trail a mishap can occur that could ruin your fun or, worse, get someone hurt. Serious accidents on trail rides are rare, but venturing from the security of home on horseback always poses a certain amount of risk. Changing weather, wildlife, the limitations of your own sense of direction--many potential hazards can sour what should be a pleasurable ride. Even on a short jaunt, an injury to yourself or your horse can isolate you, forcing you to rely on your own resources--reason enough to plan ahead and prepare for the unexpected...

Read more here:
https://equusmagazine.com/riding/trail-riding-survival-kit-8300?utm_source=EQUUSNL&%3Butm_medium=email&%3Butm_campaign=Newsletter&_hsenc=p2ANqtz--wFYKQanyxqcXdzscnMFq9GO1yX8EFD2Lcqxu5KzTDIDfFYWlBMB-KDfisUi9fy4B_uiqMh0ZbP56cuTC6ASqY0Cb6ug&_hsmi=74330068

Monday, July 01, 2019

Feeding the Anaerobic Equine Athlete

Thehorse.com - Full Article

How do you build a nutritional program that supports your high-­intensity equine athlete? Three experts share their advice in this article from the June 2019 issue of The Horse. Read an excerpt now.

Posted by Katie Navarra | Jun 28, 2019

At the National Cutting Horse Association World Championship Futurity, the final seconds of competition can determine the champion. The winning horse stays with the last cow, preventing it from returning to the herd. Another horse loses its last cow just before the buzzer sounds, only to go home without placing. In many cases, the latter horse has simply run out of gas, says Karen Davison, PhD, an equine nutritionist and director of equine technical solutions for Purina Animal Nutrition, in Gray Summit, Missouri.

“Both horses are incredibly talented elite athletes,” she says. “One just didn’t have enough energy to sustain the high-intensity workout and make that final big move to hold the cow.”

Nutrition in the form of fats and carbohydrates (sugars, starches) is the fuel that sustains performance. However, the body uses these energy sources differently depending on a workout’s duration and intensity. Take aerobic exercise, for instance: During this longer-lasting, lower-intensity work such as endurance riding, the muscle tissues use oxygen to convert fat into energy...

Read more here:
https://thehorse.com/174529/feeding-the-anaerobic-equine-athlete/