Friday, May 24, 2019

When the Phone Says “No Service” – Satellite Messengers

trailmeister.com - Full Article

May 13 2019
by Robert Eversole

When the Phone Says “No Service”

When you’re out in the wild and need to call for help, don’t be surprised if your cellphone reads “No Service.”

Losing your cell signal while outdoors can be annoying — but if you’re out riding or camping your cellphone signal can mean the difference between life and death. Injuries, being lost, and any other number of hazards can mean we need to call for help — but if there’s no signal to carry your message, then what do you do?

Unlike the phone you use every day, GPS communicators don’t need a cell signal to work. Instead, they use the network of satellites constantly orbiting overhead. Not only can they be used to track your position, but they can also be used to send and receive packages of data. We’re talking around 140 characters, like in the early days of text messaging. That may not sound like much, but it’s enough to tell your loved ones where you are (or that you’re delayed), receive medical advice, and even download an up-to-date weather report. They can also contact search and rescue virtually anywhere if the world if the sh@t really hits the fan.

I tested the three most promising satellite messengers from SatPaq, SPOT, and Garmin. I won’t sugarcoat it: none of these tools are perfect. That being said all of them could save your life when the trail gets rocky...

Read more here


Thursday, May 23, 2019

Check Horses’ Alfalfa Hay for Blister Beetles

Thehorse.com - Full Article

BLISTER BEETLES IN ALFALFA CAN BE DEADLY. HERE’S WHAT TO WATCH FOR AND HOW TO KEEP YOUR HORSES HEALTHY.

Posted by Kristen M. Janicki, MS, PAS | May 20, 2019

It might be hard to imagine that an essential part of the horse’s diet could contain potentially deadly hidden toxins. But it’s a hard truth that horse owners must be aware of: Alfalfa hay can harbor blister beetles (Epicauta spp), which can contain a harmful toxic substance called cantharidin.

A member of the Meloidae family, blister beetles live throughout the United States and Canada. Their average body length is about 0.3 to 1.3 inches. A blister beetle’s diet is mainly composed of pollen, blossoms, and leaves of flowering plants, making alfalfa the perfect meal for them. Most alfalfa infestation occurs during late summer and early fall, when the adult blister beetle population also peaks.

Male blister beetles produce a natural defense toxin called cantharidin. This irritant can cause blisters on skin (of both horses and humans) within a few hours of contact, hence the insect’s name. When ingested, cantharidin is lethal in horses with as little as half a milligram per kilogram of body weight, equivalent to consumption of around 125 beetles for an average-sized horse. And it’s not just the live insects that are harmful: The toxin is still effective long after the beetle dies...

Read more here:
https://thehorse.com/112252/check-horses-alfalfa-hay-for-blister-beetles/

Tuesday, May 21, 2019

Risk - by Irish Horse

Trails-and-trials-with-major Blog - Full Story

May 12 2019
by Irish Horse

A very sad event happened on a local trail: a horse tried to turn on a very narrow trail, lost it's footing, and slid down the side, where it broke it's leg. It had to be euthanized. This is a tragedy for horse and rider, and I have nothing but sympathy for them. There were posts wondering what trail it was, and I realized this is a trail I ride weekly. I never thought this section was particularly dangerous, but it sadly was for that horse.

Some folks called for the trail to be closed, some for it to be inspected, (which was done, and it was determined it wasn't any worse than other parts of the trail), and some remarked that horses and riding are inherently risky activities. There was a comment that all of our trails should be brought up to a higher safety standard. While great in theory, that would literally mean about 95% of the trail in question (Pioneer Express) and probably 85% of the Tevis trail (just to name a few!) would be deemed unsafe.

This brought up many different, and sometimes conflicting, ideas in my head. I DID almost slide down a (even steeper) cliff alongside the trail myself earlier this year. Luckily my athletic horse saved us. It could have gone very wrong. Maybe I should have been paying more attention to exactly where he places his feet, and riding more aggressively, but I do let Major pick the trail most of the time. Will I be more attentive in those steep sections after that? Most certainly!...

Read more here:
http://trails-and-trials-with-major.blogspot.com/2019/05/risk.html

Monday, May 20, 2019

The Long Haul to a New Home

Horseandrider.com - Full Article

A cross-country move—with a horse—is a lot to take on. Whether you’ve accepted the job of your dreams or are moving closer to family, these 12 tips will help you plan and execute a successful relocation of your horse.


KATIE NAVARRAFEB 23, 2018

Nearly a decade ago, Megan Carter and her then-12-year-old Arabian gelding, Amigo, prepared for a long trek from Juneau, Alaska, to the Eastern Seaboard. The climate and culture of upstate New York was a stark contrast of her native Alaska, but provided a once-in-a-lifetime career opportunity. But after 10 years, it was time for Carter and Amigo to return home.

“I answered the call of the eagles and decided it was time to follow my heart and return home to be with my family and friends,” she says.

In less than six weeks, Carter orchestrated a 4,000-mile relocation for herself and the now 22-year-old Amigo. Her eight-day trip crossed 12 states, the Continental Divide, and the Mississippi and Missouri Rivers, and traveled through international waters. Travel by land culminated in Bellingham, Washington. There are no roads connecting Juneau to the rest of Alaska—or even the rest of North America. That meant the final three days of the journey were aboard a ferry boat.

It wasn’t the pair’s first cross-country experience, but a lot had changed in horse relocation since they’d left Alaska. Carter relied on her tried-and-true strategies from her first adventure and learned a few more. Here she offers 12 tips to make your cross-country—and even cross-water—excursion more comfortable for you and horse...

Read more here.

Sunday, May 19, 2019

History rides in on horseback

LMTribune.com - Full Article

Nez Perce Tribe’s famed Appaloosa horses among stars of Culture Day

May 19 2019
By ERIC BARKER of the Tribune

SPALDING — Nez Perce riders dressed in full regalia and sitting astride their beautiful Appaloosa horses rode into the Nez Perce National Historic Park Saturday morning.

The dappled sunshine flooding through the trees at the park matched the distinctive spots for which the horses are known as the riders circled an event tent at Culture Day.

Joe Lewis, of Spokane and vice president of the Nez Perce Appaloosa Horse Club, said the breed that was developed by the Nez Perce Tribe in the 1700s is known for its endurance and strength. Lewis is a great-great grandson of Ollokot, a Nez Perce leader and key figure in the War of 1877, and brother of Chief Joseph...

Read more here:
https://lmtribune.com/northwest/history-rides-in-on-horseback/article_44571775-3319-541f-97b1-7529754067b7.html

Friday, May 10, 2019

Suited to Endurance?

DistanceRidersOfManitoba.ca - Full Article

April 25, 2019 by Darice Whyte

I sold one of my beautiful Arabian mares recently. I have owned Shalimar Cierra Rose for 10 years and during that time I tried to make her into an endurance horse. Despite my best attempts it just wasn’t her forte. I could tell she was thinking “how much further is this crazy lady going to ride me?”

She certainly wasn’t a 50 mile horse and she had way more whoa than go. She preferred to show me how well she could jump logs on the trail than race down the trail.

Someone once said to me “they can’t all be endurance horses you know”. I thought he was referring to other breeds. Not an Arabian! But yes, he was right. You just can’t fit a square peg into a round hole. Sometimes it just doesn’t work even if it is an Arabian...

Read more here:
http://www.distanceridersofmanitoba.ca/DRM/2019/04/25/suited-to-endurance/

Equine Colic Imitators

TheHorse.com - Full Article

MANY OTHER CONDITIONS BESIDES COLIC CAN CAUSE COLICLIKE SIGNS. AND AS WITH COLIC, DELAYED TREATMENT OR MISDIAGNOSIS CAN HAVE SERIOUS CONSEQUENCES. HERE’S WHAT YOU NEED TO KNOW.

Posted by Alexandra Beckstett, The Horse Managing Editor | Apr 22, 2019

IS IT ABDOMINAL PAIN OR SOMETHING ELSE?

Discover your horse restless, pawing, and lying down repeatedly in his stall, and you might immediately think, “He’s colicking.”

Nine times out of 10, you’re probably right. But it’s important to understand that many, many other conditions besides colic can cause coliclike signs. And as with colic, delayed treatment or misdiagnosis can have serious consequences.

“For many of these conditions, if you were to inadvertently take a horse to (exploratory colic) surgery, you might very well might make the animal worse, not to mention spend a lot of money unnecessarily,” says Barbara Dallap Schaer, VMD, Dipl. ACVS, ACVECC, associate professor of emergency medicine and critical care at the University of Pennsylvania School of Veterinary Medicine, in Kennett Square.

Dealing With Equine Colic: Here are 33 Do's and Don'ts
RELATED RESOURCE: Dealing With Equine Colic: Here are 33 Do’s and Don’ts

Veterinarians define colic as abdominal pain or discomfort—something she says is critical for owners to understand. The classic signs of a horse with colic are many...

Read more here:
https://thehorse.com/157326/equine-colic-imitators/

Thursday, May 09, 2019

Should I Wrap an Abscessed Hoof?

TheHorse.com - Full Article

Dr. Britt Conklin offers suggestions on how to keep an abscessed hoof clean.

Posted by Britt Conklin, DVM | Apr 16, 2019

Q. My horse recently had a deep abscess in her hoof and a friend advised me to keep the hoof wrapped for a bit to prevent bacteria from getting trapped into the hole as it heals. Is this a good practice? And how long should I keep her hoof wrapped?
—Via email

A.Abscesses are simply pressurized pockets of bacteria, fungi, or dying tissue that expand and travel along the path of least resistance in the foot. They’re frequently found in the epidermal layers of the wall, sole, or frog but can migrate along planes into dermal or deeper tissues when the path of least resistance drives them that direction...

Read more here:
https://thehorse.com/112599/should-i-wrap-an-abscessed-hoof/

Tuesday, May 07, 2019

Cooling a hot horse

MelNewton.com - Full Article

May 5 2019
by Mel Newton

Here’s a highly simplified and barely scientific explanation of why it’s important to cool a hot horse during a vet check at an endurance ride.

It boils down to this simple concept:

Blood has lots of jobs to do in the horse’s body. Once your horse is standing in the vet check, the blood has two choice – cool the body by going to the skin and releasing heat, or go to the GI system and absorb water, calories and electrolytes. There’s only so much blood to go around, so if it’s busy cooling your horse down, it won’t be helping the digestion system move around and do its thing. You gotta help your horse cool so the blood can prioritize the digestion system!...

Read more here:
http://melnewton.com/2019/cooling-a-hot-horse/?fbclid=IwAR3u_PIyja4_vYMkoL_jnP93TXqtQQuzZ4sxJjcDgZ19ZdqG-Yojdwu1A50

Monday, May 06, 2019

Morgan horses are an American original

LeaderTelegram.com - Full Article

May 6 2019
By Carol Watson Correspondent

The Morgan horse has proven its worth in a variety of equine disciplines, including dressage, show jumping and driving. Known for its speed, courage and gentle nature, the Morgan also is America’s first native breed.

An unusual beginning
In 1789, a Middleton, Vt., schoolteacher named Justin Morgan acquired a small colt in payment for a debt. Giving him the name of Figure, the colt’s pedigree was uncertain, although there was some evidence to suggest that he was sired by English Thoroughbred True Briton. (a.k.a. Beautiful Bay).

Standing just 14 hands high, Figure was fast and smart with so much speed and stamina that he could out-pull a draft horse and outrun the speediest racer. Stories of his exploits spread throughout New England, and Figure was soon in demand for his stud services.

Known for his prepotency, Figure passed on his good looks and abilities to his progeny, including three of his sons — Bulrush, Sherman and Woodbury. They would become the foundation bloodstock of the Morgan breed.

In his later years, Figure was put out to pasture, although he did have one final moment of glory when he was chosen to carry then-President James Monroe on a July 1817 muster-day parade in Montpelier, Vt.

Four years later, Figure died at the age of 32 from the kick of another horse on the Levi Bean Farm in Tunbridge, Vt. He is buried on that farm under a a large gray stone just 15 miles away from the grave of his namesake and first owner, Justin Morgan...

Read more here:
https://www.leadertelegram.com/country-today/horses/morgan-horses-are-an-american-original/article_7ff9a3e3-0b99-52c5-b8cd-4db685632c93.html

Tuesday, April 30, 2019

Veterinarians Discuss How to Manage Equine Gastric Ulcers

TheHorse.com - Full Article

From when to administer ulcer medication to how to deal with recurring ulcers, veterinarians offer tips and tricks on managing this common horse health condition.


Posted by Stacey Oke, DVM, MSc | Feb 20, 2019

Dealing with equine gastric ulcer syndrome (EGUS) can leave owners with more questions than answers. And they’re not alone—it turns out veterinarians have questions about EGUS, too.

As a remedy, vets participated in a question-and-answer format Table Topic on managing EGUS during the 2018 American Association of Equine Practitioners convention, held Dec. 1-5 in San Francisco, California. Frank Andrews, DVM, Dipl. ACVIM, director of the Equine Health Studies Program and clinical medicine service chief at Louisiana State University School of Veterinary Medicine, in Baton Rouge, and Sarah Reuss, VMD, Dipl. ACVIM, a veterinary specialist with Boehringer Ingelheim Animal Health, co-moderated the discussion.

Equine gastric ulcer syndrome collectively refers to ulcers or erosions in either the squamous (upper) or glandular (lower) regions of the horse’s stomach. These painful lesions have been identified in a high number of horses, particularly those in intense training and competition, and a variety of dietary and management factors can make them worse. Gastric ulcers can cause performance issues and ill-thrift and might signal the need for husbandry changes. They also warrant aggressive treatment and management...

Read more here:
https://thehorse.com/166040/veterinarians-discuss-how-to-manage-equine-gastric-ulcers/

Monday, April 29, 2019

Brendan Riley’s Solano Chronicles: ‘Deafy’ Derrick’s Tall Tales

TimesHeraldOnline.com - Full Article

By BRENDAN RILEY |
April 28, 2019

Frank “Deafy” Derrick, one of Vallejo’s most colorful characters a century ago, claimed to have ridden with Kit Carson to Montana, where he met William “Buffalo Bill” Cody and they both became Pony Express riders and Indian fighters. It turns out Derrick made up many of his stories — but he still had plenty of true horseback adventures.

When Derrick died in 1938, the San Francisco native was eulogized as “one of the last links” to the Wild West. Newspapers recounted his story of running away at age 10 and winding up in Virginia City, Nev. He said he then rode with Carson from Nevada to Montana, meeting Cody there in 1862. “Deafy,” who got his nickname (pronounced deefy) because he was deaf, also told of fighting Indians on his 75-mile-long Pony Express route. He said he was wounded 10 times by bullets and arrows.

There are many holes in those stories. For starters, in 1862 “Buffalo Bill” was a teenager in Kansas, and his own claim of riding for the Pony Express has been challenged. The Pony Express started in 1860, lasted only 18 months and was gone before the end of 1861 — and its route never ran through Montana. Then there’s Derrick’s claim in his later years to be nine or 10 years older than he really was — possibly to put him closer in age to “Buffalo Bill” and make his stories more believable. But numerous records show he was born in 1856. Skinny boys in their teens were favored as Pony Express riders, but not 6-year-old children — Derrick’s age in 1862. As for riding with Kit Carson, Carson’s last stop in Nevada was in 1853 — three years before Derrick was born — and he was mainly in New Mexico throughout the 1860s...

Read more here:
https://www.timesheraldonline.com/2019/04/28/brendan-rileys-solano-chronicles-deafy-derricks-tall-tales/

Friday, April 26, 2019

Heather Wallace, The Timid Rider, Launches Equestrian Confidence Retreat in Mongolia

April 24 2019

Discover, immerse, and build confidence in the saddle while learning horsemanship in the heart of Mongolia. Experience the nomadic culture from the back of an ancient breed of horse. Relax, have fun, and enjoy the ride while changing your mindset into one that is more positive!

A brand new and exclusive horse-riding retreat will launch July 2020 in the Khentti Plain of Mongolia, hosted by Heather Wallace, The Timid Rider, and Camille Champagne, an FEI 3* Endurance Rider and Natural Horsemanship Trainer.

This retreat is the perfect opportunity to explore the Mongolian nomadic culture for riders that may struggle with confidence in the saddle. Learn natural horsemanship to understand behavior better and improve communication, learn a positive mindset and meditation techniques. Muster horses with the nomads, ride across the Gobi Desert with Heather and Camille, and end the day with yoga, and so much more. The possibilities are endless.

One week can change your life.

We are now taking applications. Six spots are available for July 26 to August 1, 2020.


About Heather Wallace

Heather Wallace is the award-winning author of Confessions of a Timid Rider, and equestrian blogger at The Timid Rider talking honestly about confidence, challenging yourself, and overcoming obstacles.

Heather is also the Content Manager and a regular writer for EquineInfoExchange.com as well as the Media Coordinator for the Gobi Desert Cup, an endurance race in Mongolia. In her spare time, of which she has little, she spends her time with her husband, three children, two dogs, and pony. You can follow her on social media @timidrider or at timidrider.com.

Contact:
Heather Wallace
Ph: 732-784-7195
Em: heather@timidrider.com
www.timidrider.com

Wednesday, April 24, 2019

Horse Topline-Building Tips

TheHorse.com - Full Article

These six steps can help transform your horse’s topline from underdeveloped to well-toned.

Posted by Christa Lesté-Lasserre, MA | Apr 23, 201

Six ways to transform your horse’s topline from underdeveloped to well-toned
Bettina had a good topline. Her neck and back musculature was even, with no fat lumps. Her neck transitioned smoothly into her shoulders, with no abrupt or angular gaps alongside her withers. Her spine was surrounded by a nice continuum of toned muscles along its length down into the croup.

Then, life happened. I bred my 1,500-pound, 17-hand Warmblood mare, and she had a foal. Then another. Then I loaned her out to a couple of young riders who started her back under saddle doing dressage, jumping, and cross-country. And little by little the problems started. While she took home ribbons at shows, she became grumpy, pinning her ears when she saw riders approaching her stall, snapping while getting girthed up. Eventually she showed subtle signs of lameness, leading to her retirement.

Bettina arrived home fit, strong, lame, and with a prominent ridge spanning from withers to rump. Her vertebral column peaked above everything around it. The top of her croup protruded, and she had gaps beside her withers. At 13 years old Bettina wasn’t starved, wasn’t neglected, and wasn’t unfit. But she, like many other working horses, had a severely undeveloped topline. Her history of foaling, poor saddle fit, possibly inappropriate nutrition, and lameness all ­contributed.

With proper attention to her needs and a lot of patience, though, I’m seeing Bettina’s lovely look start to come back again. These six steps can help others in the same boat achieve a topline ­transformation...

Read more here:
https://thehorse.com/170405/horse-topline-building-tips/

Tuesday, April 23, 2019

All About Feeding Horses Alfalfa

Thehorse.com - Full Article

Learn more about alfalfa and whether this leafy green legume is a good choice for your horse.

Posted by Heather Smith Thomas | Mar 11, 2019

How much do you really know about this leafy green legume?
In some areas of the country, alfalfa is a regular part of life. It’s readily available and commonly fed, so it’s a logical foundation for many horses’ diets. In other areas, it is a delicacy of sorts, shipped in from different regions and bought a bale at a time on a vet’s recommendation to help certain horses that need nutritional support. For some types of horses—in either of those areas—-alfalfa simply isn’t a great choice. And, so, that fragrant green bale comes loaded with nutrients and, for some horse owners, a multitude of misconceptions.

Whatever your alfalfa experience, we’re here to tell you everything you need to know about this forage, starting with a little bit of history, and clear up any confusion about it...

Read more here:
https://thehorse.com/110110/all-about-alfalfa/

Horse Hoof Abscess Facts

Thehorse.com - Full Article

Do abscesses occur more often in front or hind hooves? Do male or female horses recover from hoof abscesses quicker? When are abscesses most commonly diagnosed? Researchers found answers to these questions and more in a recent study.

Posted by Christa Lesté-Lasserre, MA | Apr 17, 2019

Fact: Hoof abscesses are one of the most common causes of sudden-onset severe lameness in horses.
Fact: Complications can delay hoof abscess healing.

Fact: In most cases, horses recover well.

And, until recently, there wasn’t much more scientific data on subsolar abscesses than that. So researchers from the University of Pennsylvania School of Veterinary Medicine (Penn Vet) set out to put more hard data behind these common hoof ailments. They wanted to identify trends that could help horse owners and their veterinarians better manage abscesses and more accurately anticipate how they’ll heal and if they’re likely to develop complications...

Read more here:
https://thehorse.com/170191/horse-hoof-abscess-facts/

Monday, April 22, 2019

​​​Horse Buyers: Don’t Make These Critical Veterinary ​Pre-Purchase Exam Mistakes

Equinelegalsolutions.com - Full Article

1. Not Getting a Pre-Purchase Exam

At Equine Legal Solutions, many of our legal consultations are with unhappy horse buyers. One of the first questions we ask is, “Did you get a pre-purchase vet exam?” Often, the answer is “no.” The buyer regretfully explains they thought it would be “too expensive” to get a PPE, or they “really trusted” the seller. But now, they now own a horse they never would have bought if they knew what its true physical condition was. Frequently, the horse has a chronic lameness issue or other physical condition that will make it nearly impossible to resell (or even give away), creating a frustrating and expensive situation for the buyer. In hindsight, the buyer would have happily spent $1,000 or more on a pre-purchase exam and avoided the considerably higher expense of diagnosing and treating the horse’s problems.

2. Using the Seller’s Vet

Often, horse buyers use the seller’s vet to perform a pre-purchase exam, particularly in situations where the horse is located in another city, state or even country. This situation presents a conflict of interest for the vet, to the point where some equine veterinarians have a strict policy of not performing pre-purchase exams on clients’ horses...

Read more here:
https://www.equinelegalsolutions.com/critical-veterinary-pre-purchase-exam-mistakes.html

Sunday, April 21, 2019

Supplement Could Help Control Horse Pasture Parasite Burdens

Thehorse.com - Full Article

Could adding a supplement to your horses’ feed reduce the worm burden on your pasture? Researchers recently tested an Australian product designed to do just that—and with positive results.

Posted by Jill Griffiths | Mar 5, 2019

Could adding a supplement to your horses’ feed reduce the worm burden on your pasture? Researchers recently tested an Australian product designed to do just that—and with positive results.

In recent field trials a feed supplement (commercially available in Australia as BioWorma) effectively reduced the “gastrointestinal nematode (GIN) infectivity of pasture surrounding the feces of treated horses,” the researchers said.

The supplement contains spores of the fungus Duddingtonia flagrans IAH 1297. The fungal spores pass through the horse’s gastrointestinal tract unharmed and are deposited in manure. There, they germinate and grow a mass of fungal hyphae—fine rootlike structures—and sticky traps that inhibit worm larvae, ultimately trapping and killing them...

Read more here:
https://thehorse.com/165635/supplement-could-help-control-horse-pasture-parasite-burdens/

Horses and Sheep Coexist Well, Improve Pasture Health

Thehorse.com - Full Article

Researchers recently studied how horses and sheep interacted with each other and used pasture resources—plants, water, and shade.

Posted by Christa Lesté-Lasserre, MA | Mar 3, 2019

We all want pristine and productive pastures for our horses. Research suggests mixing grazing species can help support healthy pasture maintenance. But while protecting the pasture is important, so is protecting the welfare of the animals living on it. That’s why researchers recently studied the behavior of horses sharing a pasture with sheep. They wanted to see how the animals interacted with each other and how they used the pasture resources (namely plants, water, and shade).

They found that the sheep and horses in their study coexisted peacefully and even began to intermingle, said Monika Greguła-Kania, PhD, of the University of Life Sciences Institute of Animal Breeding and Biodiversity Conservation, in Lublin, Poland.

“We observed no aggression between these species,” Greguła-Kania said. “Both species mixed together and even drank from one single water tank at the same time...”

Read more here:
https://thehorse.com/167577/horses-and-sheep-coexist-well-improve-pasture-health/

Deciphering Your Feed Tag: Performance Horse Feeds

Thehorse.com - Full Article

These feeds are designed to boost horses’ calorie intake and meet additional nutrient needs that increase with work.

Posted by Shannon Pratt-Phillips, MSc, PhD | Mar 22, 2019

In the second installment of our three-part commercial feed tag series, we take a look at working horses and their energy needs.

It probably goes without saying, but performance horse feeds are designed to meet the nutrient requirements of athletic horses. The greatest increase in nutrient requirements (other than water!) these animals experience when they work or perform is energy, which is quantified in the diet as calories. Heavily exercising horses burn more calories than they might be able to consume with hay or pasture alone. Thus, manufacturers have designed commercial performance feeds to boost horses’ calorie intake, as well as to meet additional nutrient needs that increase with work.

Essential Energy

In the figure below, you can see energy and protein requirements rising with increasing levels of work and how the horses’ elevated calorie needs are far greater than their elevated protein needs. While other nutrient requirements, such as those for calcium and phosphorus, also increase with work, calories should always be your biggest concern...

Read more here:
https://thehorse.com/113202/deciphering-your-feed-tag-performance-horse-feeds/

Saturday, April 20, 2019

Hoof Boots Market with Current Trends, 2018-2028

NewsFinancialAnalyst.com - full article

April 19, 2019 James

Market Overview:

Professionals who practice horse riding feel that hoof boots are excellent substitutes to the earlier used horseshoes. Hoof boots are often used as a backup either when the farrier is unavailable or in case of a thrown horseshoe or as hoof protection for a barefoot horse. The popularity of hoof boots is increasing in all disciplines of horse riding, particularly in endurance riding and trail riding. With the increasing demand, hoof boots are now available for every kind of horse playing any discipline of horse riding. Hoof boots are extremely necessary for horses that have recently been inducted into the sport, to protect their hoof from getting damaged in the uncomfortable terrains. Additionally, in some hoof boots, equine hoof pads are provided to ensure more comfort and additional support...

Full report at:
https://newsfinancialanalyst.com/hoof-boots-market-with-current-trends-analysis-2018-2028/

Friday, April 19, 2019

Adversity is a Catalyst for Change

Thriveglobal.com - Full Article

By Charisse Glenn, Casting Director, Equestrian and Creator of The Let Go
April 18 2019

Adversity is a part of life. Some of us have more of it than others yet, we all experience it. The manner in which it comes into our lives is as diverse as the adversity itself. Finding ways to be resilient in the face of life’s’ challenges is a measure of who we are.

Conflict is challenging for me. I am not a good fighter. However, when faced with adversity the warrior woman in me surfaces.

Like all of us, I have navigated family, relationship, career, and financial hardships. Yet, much of the adversity in my life has come in the form of natural disasters. Living in California, fires, floods, and earthquakes are a matter of course.

I was forced, however, to face my own mortality while competing in a 100-mile endurance horse race, in the Australia Outback. Caught in the worst storm in 100 years, lightning struck inches from my body and that of the horse I was on.

So loud it became silent, so bright, I was blinded. Time stood still. The world stopped. I could not make a move, whether it was physically possible or not, I was paralyzed as the lightning struck three times…caging us within its fury. When my senses returned, survival mode kicked in and all I could think about was, I am alive…get off of the mountain.

What doesn’t kill us makes us stronger. And we carry on. And that’s what I did...

Read more here:
https://thriveglobal.com/stories/adversity-is-a-catalyst-for-change/

Thursday, April 18, 2019

How Veterinarians, Students, and Volunteers Saved Horses During a Deadly Wildfire

Thehorse.com - Full Article

Last fall, Hayley Dieckmann and the UC Davis Veterinary Emergency Response Team treated horses and other animals displaced by the Camp Fire. Here’s a look at what she experienced.


Posted by Hayley Dieckmann | Jan 31, 2019

Late last year, Northern California experienced the largest and deadliest wildfire in recent history. Butte County was on fire for 17 days. The Camp Fire killed at least 85 people and changed the lives of thousands more.

Countless more animals—including horses—were injured, traumatized, displaced, or killed by the fire. Those that survived needed care, even if their owners had evacuated the area. That’s where we came in.

During the Fire
Rescue workers, owners, and good Samaritans brought horses and livestock to the Butte County Fairgrounds for shelter and veterinary care. During the peak of the fire, the Butte County large animal shelter housed more than 700 evacuated animals, from horses to chickens to every livestock animal between...

Read more here:
https://thehorse.com/165984/how-veterinarians-students-and-volunteers-saved-horses-during-a-deadly-wildfire/

Why Are My Horse’s Hooves Growing So Fast?

Thehorse.com - Full Article

Why does a horse’s hooves grow faster than his stablemates’ who are on the same diet and exercise schedule? A veterinarian who’s also a farrier shares his thoughts.

Posted by Scott Fleming, DVM, CF | Mar 27, 2019

Q. I keep my Western pleasure horse’s front feet shod year-round so he can stay in work during the winter and to keep his hooves in decent shape; otherwise they tend to flare and crack. During our main riding season (March-late October), he’s on a six-week trim and reset schedule. But during the winter, when all our other horses’ hoof growth slows, his doesn’t—the farrier jokes that he could be trimmed every three weeks. What could be causing his hooves to grow so fast, and why would it be different from the other horses? They’re all on the same diet, exercise schedules, etc., they just have different genetics...

Read more here:
https://thehorse.com/168955/why-are-my-horses-hooves-growing-so-fast/

Liquid blood taken from 42,000-year-old frozen horse that scientists hope to clone

Foxnews.com - Full Article

By Ann W. Schmidt | Fox News
April 17 2019

Scientists were able to extract liquid blood from the heart of a 42,000-year-old foal that had been frozen and preserved in permafrost in Siberia.

The scientists are hoping to clone the prehistoric horse — which was discovered in the Siberian region of Yakutia last summer — and bring it back to life, according to The Siberian Times.

“We can now claim that this is the best-preserved Ice Age animal ever found in the world,” Semyon Grigoryev, the head of the Mammoth Museum in the regional capital of Yakutsk, told the outlet.

The foal, which is believed to be from the extinct species Equus lenensis, or Lena horse, was discovered with its skin, hair, hooves and tail all preserved. The foal was believed to be just weeks old when it likely drowned in the mud which later froze and turned to permafrost...

Read more here:
https://www.foxnews.com/science/liquid-blood-frozen-horse-clone

Sunday, April 07, 2019

Horse Gut Sounds and What They Mean

KPPUSA.com - Full Article

One way to determine if your horse is normal and healthy is to evaluate the rumblings of his gut. The technical term for a gut sound is a borborygmus (pronounced bôr′bə-rĭg′məs). The plural is borborygmi. During a physical exam a veterinarian will listen to your horse’s gut sounds with a stethoscope in the flank area to determine if normal borborygmi are present. When listening for gut sounds, both sides of the horse are evaluated and the abdomen is divided into four areas or quadrants. A healthy horse will have consistent and active rumblings in each of the four quadrants. Each area should be evaluated for at least one minute. As a general rule, it is normal to hear 1 to 3 borborygmi in a 60-second period. If less than 1 borborygmus is heard per minute then that portion of the gut is noted as hypomotile (not enough movement). If more than 3 borborygmi are heard per minute the area is noted as hypermotile (too much movement). Of course, there are variations depending on the individual horse and when he or she last ate.

Typically when a horse presents with impending enterocolitis, which often results in diarrhea, he will have a hypermotile gut with increased liquid and gas sounds. Hypermotility can be present in the early stages of obstructive disease. Hypomotility, however, is the sign of a poor gut movement and an absence of gut sounds may indicate the presence of an obstruction...

Read more here:
http://kppusa.com/2015/07/02/horse-gut-sounds/

Solar Power System for Horse Trailers

Trailmeister.com - Full Article

March 29 2019
by Robert Eversole

My Solar Power System for Horse Trailers

As Published in the April 2019 issue of Horsemen’s Corral

When we started planning the Trailer Project one of the very first things that we looked into was a solar power system. The majority of places that we camp and those areas that are still on the bucket list, don’t have electric hookups. I wanted to avoid noisy generators and hauling the fuel for said noisy generators.

A solar power system works from dawn to dusk, silently, odor free, without fuel, no matter where you are or what you are doing. Rolling down the road, parked at the gas station, or camping, the batteries are being charged.

Horse Trailer Solar Power System

They start charging before you feed the horses, keep charging while you ride, and continue all day. They don’t quit until nightfall. You never have to think about the batteries being charged. It just happens. Like magic.

I don’t know about you, but I think electrical terms can be confusing. Amp, watts, and Oh My! Here’s an easier way to think about solar electrical systems for our horse trailers...

Read more here:
https://www.trailmeister.com/solar-power-system-horse-trailers/

Thursday, April 04, 2019

10 Tips for Traveling Solo With Your Horse

USRider.org - Full Article

A few simple measures can help you head off trouble and give you peace of mind.


By Hope Ellis-Ashburn | 4/1/2019

For years, I’ve enjoyed attending trail rides, horse shows and clinics with a group of like-minded friends. We’ve developed a “mobile buddy system,” helping each other out, cheering each other on and just being there to offer support when needed. I long ago became accustomed to having a friend assist me with parking my trailer, loading and unloading my horse, settling in at horse shows and generally lending a hand by sharing supplies and providing moral support when I have show-ring jitters.

Then a day I dreaded finally arrived: A show I had looked forward to for several months was on the calendar and no one in my group of friends would be able to go.

I briefly considered calling the whole thing off and waiting until the next event when at least one member of our group could go with me. But I had worked hard to prepare for this show, and I wasn’t ready to simply scratch it from my schedule. As I considered my options, I realized that I knew plenty of riders who routinely trailered their horses to shows, trail outings and other destinations on their own. Why couldn’t I? After all, I wasn’t a complete novice at shipping or showing, and I knew I could put to use the collective wisdom I had accumulated over the years of traveling with my friends. So, after careful consideration, I decided that I was ready to go it alone.

I signed up for the show, trailered my mare there and had a wonderful time. In fact, the next time I’m faced with the need to go it alone, I won’t hesitate. Still, even for veteran travelers, the prospect of trailering your horse on your own can sometimes be daunting, and it’s easy to lose track of basic trip-planning imperatives, amid all the usual horse show preparations. So, I’ve compiled a list of a few measures that gave me peace of mind on my first solo outing and that I still mentally review each time I’m traveling with my horse alone...

Read more here

The Jockey Club Repeats its Call for Major Reform

Bloodhorse.com - Full Article

Statement: Horse fatalities are a nationwide problem that need to be addressed.

The Jockey Club Press Release
Release Date: April 1, 2019

The Jockey Club again emphasized the need for extensive reforms in an April 1 released that followed the catastrophic breakdown of a horse racing March 31 at Santa Anita Park.

A 23rd horse died at Santa Anita Park only three days after racing resumed; it is the 23rd horse fatality in the past three months.

The string of deaths at Santa Anita isn't the first spike in fatalities at a U.S. racetrack—these tragic events have happened before at other tracks and they will continue to occur without significant reform to the horse racing industry. The issue isn't about a single track; horse fatalities are a nationwide problem that need to be addressed on an industrywide basis.

The Jockey Club Calls for Extensive Reforms

There has been tremendous focus on the track surface, but the core of the problem lies in a fundamentally flawed system that falls far short of international horse racing standards -- standards that better protect horses and result in far fewer injuries and deaths.

Chief among the principles that make up the standards of the International Federation of Horseracing Authorities (IFHA) are those guiding the development of an effective anti-doping program and the regulation of the use of performance-enhancing drugs and drugs that can mask injuries, both of which can result in injuries and deaths...

Read more here:
https://www.bloodhorse.com/horse-racing/articles/232862/the-jockey-club-repeats-its-call-for-major-reform

Wednesday, April 03, 2019

France bans the trimming of horse whiskers

VetPracticeMag.com.au - Full Article

March 28 2019
by Editor

The French Equestrian Federation (FFE) has banned the removal of a horse’s whiskers on welfare grounds. It joins Germany and Switzerland in bringing into effect a rule that would disqualify any horse from competition if the whiskers have been removed.

On their website they state that vibrissae, the correct term for whiskers— which are the long tactile hairs around the eye, nose and mouth of the horse—are sensory organs. And just like cat’s whiskers, they allow the horse to gather information about the environment. Around the eyes they serve as protection and, around the blind spot of the nose, they take over from the eyes.

The FFE has just incorporated a rule on this subject in their General Competition Regulations and, from early 2019, competing on a horse that has been deprived of his/her vibrissae is no longer permitted...

Read more here:
https://vetpracticemag.com.au/france-bans-the-trimming-of-horse-whiskers/?fbclid=IwAR2FL97dNhW1bShFPbkqTQENQqGufbUW8vvehh31jcgT-xQcHLey_1T-LfE

Tuesday, April 02, 2019

The most violent group of people who ever lived: Horse-riding Yamnaya tribe

DailyMail.co.uk - Full Article

The most violent group of people who ever lived: Horse-riding Yamnaya tribe who used their huge height and muscular build to brutally murder and invade their way across Europe than 4,000 years ago

• Yamnaya people dominated Europe from between 5,000 and 4,000 years ago
• They had nutritionally rich diets and were tall, muscular and skilled horse riders
• It is believed they exploited a continent recovering from disease and death
• They spread rapidly, adapting and massacring their way throughout Europe
• Slaughtered Neolithic men in prehistoric genocide to ensure their DNA survived
• They made their way to Britain and within a few generations there was no remains of the previous inhabitants who built Stonehenge in the genetic record

By Joe Pinkstone For Mailonline
Published: 15:49 EDT, 29 March 2019 | Updated: 03:10 EDT, 1 April 2019

A brutish tribe of people who lived in the Neolithic era more than 4,000 years ago is being touted as the most violent and aggressive society to ever live.

A growing body of evidence is convincing archaeologists that the Yamnaya society ruthlessly massacred opposing societies.

It is believed the primitive society capitalised on disease, warfare and famine and unceremoniously swept through Europe, destroying entire civilisations and leaving destruction in their wake.

DNA evidence from several prehistoric burial sites has revealed hoards of these tall, muscular and violent warriors would overwhelm other societies on horseback.

They would murder men and sire their own children so that within a few generations the presence of the previous societies is all but eradicated...

Read more here:
https://www.dailymail.co.uk/sciencetech/article-6865741/The-violent-group-people-lived.html?ito=rss-flipboard


Sunday, March 24, 2019

Trailer Insulation

Trailmeister.com - Full Article

by Robert Eversole
February 7 2019

Trailer Insulation is one of the first steps in any DIY build, and it’s also one of the most misunderstood. There’s a lot of misconceptions about trailer insulation, and people end up wasting money and time on unnecessary steps and products.

When we were building our trailer we had all kinds of questions about insulation: What’s the best material to use? How do we install it? Do I need a vapor barrier? What questions do I not know enough to ask?

So what is the best way to insulate a DIY horse trailer? Below, we’ll go over how heat is transferred and how to stop it; discuss what you need to know about insulation, look at some of the different products available, and how best to use them.

There are three types of heat transfer: radiation, conduction, and convection...

Read more here:
https://www.trailmeister.com/trailer-insulation/

Friday, March 22, 2019

Endurance.net Adds New Blog: Books for Endurance Riders

March 22 2019

https://booksbyenduranceriders.blogspot.com/

Looking for books to read about endurance riding? Long distance riding? Conditioning? Endurance history? Adventure rides? We've got you covered.

You can build your own endurance library by browsing our list. "Books for Endurance Riders" can be found with our other blogs, by clicking on the "News, Stories" tab on www.endurance.net:

www.endurance.net/newsblogs/

Should My Horse Exercise on an Empty Stomach?

Riding before your horse gets fed could put him at risk for gastric ulcers. Find out why.

Posted by Clair Thunes, PhD | Mar 18, 2019

Q.I board my horse and ride in the morning and sometimes late afternoon, often before he gets fed. I am worried about the potential gastric ulcer risk of riding him on an empty stomach. Is there anything I can do to combat this?

—Via e-mail

A.You’re right to be concerned. Although historically it wasn’t the case, veterinarians now generally understand that horses should have some amount of food in their stomach, ideally, at all times...

Read more here:
https://thehorse.com/168300/should-my-horse-exercise-on-an-empty-stomach/

All IR/EMS Horses Have Laminitis

March 19, 2019

Eleanor M. Kellon, VMD

The Equine Cushing's and Insulin Resistance Group outreach forum (https://ecir.groups.io/g/main) has been in existence for almost 20 years and currently has over 11,000 international members. As you might expect, many members seek out the group when their horse/pony/mini/donkey/mule becomes obviously laminitic. Others report issues confirmed by blood work, but state they have never had problems with laminitis.

Unfortunately, they're wrong.

Back in 2004, Johnson, et al., published an article entitled Endocrinopathic Laminitis in the Horse. They described a "remodeling" of the laminae that occurs in horses with EMS or PPID (Cushing’s disease). Specifically, there is lengthening and thinning of the dermal lamellae that leads to weakening and predisposes to separation, with resultant white line widening, rotation, and sinking. This occurs without the basement membrane damage and white blood cell infiltration characteristic of other types of laminitis.

Of particular interest was the report that these changes are clearly visible microscopically, and on radiographs, in horses not showing any obvious signs of pain, inflammation or lameness.

Johnson focused on a possible role for cortisol in these changes, but more recent research has clearly shown that it is insulin elevation that is to blame. Exactly how this happens is still unclear. There is growing evidence that insulin may be acting through the IGF-1 (insulin-like growth factor) receptors to cause increased cellular proliferation.

There is some discrepancy in published studies regarding whether or not dermal and epidermal tissues in the lamellae express insulin receptors. If they do, high insulin may stimulate the changes seen via those receptors. In humans, epidermal keratinocytes stimulated with insulin show the same proliferation and elongation seen in the lamellae.

It has also been shown that endocrinopathic laminitis, like human metabolic syndrome, is characterized by increased levels of the potent vasoconstrictor endothelin-1, which may be causing cellular proliferation via endothelin receptors with reduction in perfusion and delivery of oxygen/glucose to the laminae. Positive responses to herbal and amino acid support for nitric oxide generation suggest this is part of the mechanism. Hypoxia (low oxygen tension) itself also causes migration and proliferation of keratinocytes via release of HIF-1 (hypoxia inducible factor). The imbalance between vasodilating nitric oxide and vasoconstricting endothelin-1 is directly caused by high insulin levels within the blood vessels.

Regardless of the exact mechanism, the important thing to realize is that these changes are occurring in every horse with elevated insulin, whether they are recognized to be in pain or not. Low-level lameness is easy to miss because the pain is symmetrical (no head bob). More subtle signs include less spontaneous activity, reluctance to make sharp turns, muscle tension in the forearms, back and hindquarters, more rigid head carriage (high or low), and a subdued attitude. These horses can easily be pushed over the edge into more severe pain by dietary indiscretions or even cold weather.

The good news is that meticulous attention to dietary simple carbohydrates, calories/weight, mineral balancing and additional nutritional support as needed is very successful in controlling insulin and restoring your horse's love of life.

If you suspect your horse has high insulin, get a diagnosis and take correct action. Don’t allow hoof damage to progress to the point of being crippling.


About ECIR Group Inc.

Started in 1999, the ECIR Group is the largest field-trial database for PPID and EMS in the world and provides the latest research, diagnosis, and treatment information, in addition to dietary recommendations for horses with these conditions. Even universities do not and cannot compile and follow long term as many in-depth case histories of PPID/EMS horses as the ECIR Group.

In 2013 the Equine Cushing's and Insulin Resistance Group Inc., an Arizona nonprofit corporation, was approved as a 501(c)3 public charity. Tax deductible contributions and grants support ongoing research, education, and awareness of Equine Cushing's Disease/PPID and EMS.

THE MISSION of the ECIR Group Inc. is to improve the welfare of equines with metabolic disorders via a unique interface between basic research and real-life clinical experience. Prevention of laminitis is the ultimate goal. The ECIR Group serves the scientific community, practicing clinicians, and owners by focusing on investigations most likely to quickly, immediately, and significantly benefit the welfare of the horse.

https://www.ecirhorse.org/video.php

Contact: Nancy Collins
603-323-7469
ecirgroup1@gmail.com

Thursday, March 21, 2019

Leg-bone density increases in response to Endurance training, study shows

Horsetalk.co.nz - Full Article

March 21, 2019
Horsetalk.co.nz

The thickness and density of the leg bones in endurance horses increase in response to training for the discipline, research shows.

Researchers in the Brazilian study investigated the cortical bone – the dense outer surface of bone that forms a protective layer around the internal cavity.

The aim of the study by Mariana Damazio Rajão and her colleagues was to understand the bone response to exercise adaptations in the hopes it might provide clues to reducing the occurrence of orthopedic injuries in Endurance horses...

Read more here:
https://www.horsetalk.co.nz/2019/03/21/leg-bone-density-endurance-training/

Wednesday, March 20, 2019

Arizona’s wild horse paradox

HCN.org - Full Article

Activists and agencies try to balance the West’s horse mythology against herd impacts.

December 13 2018
Debbie Weingarten

he horses stood chest-deep in the river, pulling up long strands of eelgrass with their teeth. There must have been 20 of them, in colors ranging from nearly white to ruddy brown. The babies stood wobbly in the current. My partner and I floated quietly past in our kayak, trying not to spook them. But it was a sweltering Friday in July, and we were followed by hollering college students in rented innertubes. Beer coolers floated along behind them, and music reverberated off the canyon walls. Uninterested and used to the party, the horses barely looked up.

A stone’s throw from metropolitan Phoenix, the Salt River runs through the Tonto National Forest, where deer, bighorn sheep and bald eagles live amid cactus and mesquite bosques. But the most famous and controversial inhabitants are the area’s “wild” horses. Once slated for removal by the U.S. Forest Service for reasons of public safety, today these horses are protected by state law. Now, in the first arrangement of its kind, a state government is working with a nonprofit to manage horses on federal land. Now long-feuding entities must work together to find a way to balance the horses — and the mythology of the American West they represent — with river and land conservation and public safety...

Read more here:
https://www.hcn.org/issues/51.5/wild-horses-arizonas-wild-horse-paradox

Delivering aid on horseback – a feel-good adventure through India

Telegraph.co.uk - Full Article

by Kat Brown
19 MARCH 2019

I’m riding through the tufted fields of Rajasthan’s Thar desert, marvelling at how it really does look more like I’m in West Wittering than halfway across the world, when the inquiry comes from our ride leader, Alexander Souri. “How do you all feel about a gallop?”

We eight Relief Riders – four Americans, four Britons – sit up a bit straighter. Oooh. A gallop would be lovely, thank you. The grin that has been plastered on my face since I landed in India five days earlier becomes even wider.

Our journey, book-ended by days in Delhi and Jaipur, is heading towards the celebrated horse and camel fair that is held in Pushkar each November, but for now I can’t imagine being anywhere else, because this is absolute heaven.

My horse, sensing her rider has stopped contributing to the ride, slams on the brakes to avoid us catapulting into a wall. As we slide into trot, I turn to see the group’s two beginners with their jolly, mustachioed ride leader, Ranveer Singh, cantering up behind us. A nice feature of Relief Riders is you can learn en route – and what a way to do it.

For 15 years, Alexander’s company Relief Riders has run humanitarian adventures in India, as well as in Turkey and Ecuador, combining a riding holiday with targeted aid that, to date, has helped more than 25,000 people, most of them children...

Read more here:
https://www.telegraph.co.uk/travel/destinations/asia/india/rajasthan/articles/horse-riding-holiday-india/

Saturday, March 16, 2019

Wild Horses Could Drag You Away – To The Bank. The Government Will Pay You $1,000 To Adopt One

NWPB.org - listen

By Amanda Peacher March 14, 2019

BY AMANDA PEACHER / BSPR
The Bureau of Land Management is offering people $1,000 if they’ll adopt a wild horse.

The agency says more than 80,000 wild horses and burros are on rangelands across the West right now. The animals can damage rangeland and when their populations are high some of them starve.

The BLM captures the animals and keeps them in corrals, but some of the less feral ones get adopted out.

Debbie Collins is a wild horse and burro national outreach specialist with BLM. She says the animals’ numbers are up, but adoptions are down. Most corrals are at capacity of about 6,000.

“So what’s happened is our numbers on the range have increased even more, so we’re at nearly 82,000 animals on our public lands,” says Collins...

Read more and listen:
https://www.nwpb.org/2019/03/14/wild-horses-could-drag-you-away-to-the-bank-the-government-will-pay-you-1000-to-adopt-one/?fbclid=IwAR3jbAcHe17thoqoKWIPJ1Y0To9Hkl01-rLPNEd6-DCyXBPNGWhES7Pi9fM

Wednesday, March 13, 2019

Book Shows How Love And Trust Between Horse And Human Can Overcome Almost Impossible Obstacles

PRWeb.com

Barbara Jagoda announces the release of ‘Magna Terra Smoky’

COLORADO SPRINGS, COLO. (PRWEB) MARCH 13, 2019

As long as she can remember, Barbara Jagoda has always had a tremendous love and passion for animals. Her admiration of and love for a two-year-old colt who captured her heart by beating all odds and becoming a record-breaking champion in the Arabian Racing World inspired Jagoda to write “Magna Terra Smoky” (published by Trafford Publishing).For more details about the book, please visit https://www.amazon.com/Magna-Terra-Smoky-Barbara-Jagoda/dp/1490791841

The book tells the incredible adventure of an unwanted, insecure two-year-old colt who, sadly is heading for the auction barn. Due to the impeccable timing of events, a human would enter his life and together, they would overcome his fears and injuries to become the “One Eyed Wonder” and a legend in the Arabian Racing World.

“This is truly a ‘Cinderella’ kind of a horse story to be enjoyed by everyone who loves animals. It shows readers how the love and trust that develop between a horse and a human can overcome almost impossible obstacles. There are heartbreak and sadness in the storyline as well as extreme highs and happy, exciting moments,” Jagoda says.

“Magna Terra Smoky” shows readers how it was very close for a talented and exceptional horse came to have his life ended at an auction barn. Smoky is a living proof of what a little luck, love, patience and determination can produce. “Horse racing has had some bad raps, but there is still a lot of good people in the sport who genuinely care for their horses,” Jagoda adds.

“Magna Terra Smoky”
By Barbara Jagoda
Hardcover | 6 x 9in | 332 pages | ISBN 9781490791852
Softcover | 6 x 9in | 332 pages | ISBN 9781490791845
E-Book | 332 pages | ISBN 9781490791869
Available at Amazon and Barnes & Noble

About the Author
Barbara Jagoda is a retired science schoolteacher and racehorse trainer who now works part time as a test administrator for a global company. During her university years, she enjoyed working as a wrangler at Cheley Camps, located near Estes Park, Colorado where she developed a fond rapport with her assigned horse, Pearl. Upon graduation and receiving her first paycheck as a new teacher, she immediately purchased Pearl as the first of her long string of equine companions. During the 1970s and 1980s, she went on to enjoy many years as a competitor in North American Trail Ride Conference (competitive trail riding) and later served as a judge for these events. Brandy (registered name of Sheiks Scimitar) was a favorite mount during these years and the two made a formidable team. In later years, she also competed in American Endurance Ride Conference (endurance riding) on another favorite horse, Roc-et Arapaho. Over the years, she has rescued and rehabilitated over a dozen horses either from auction houses or from homes where she discovered starving horses. She currently resides and enjoys living on a small ranch outside of Colorado Springs, Colorado where Magna Terra Smoky and a number of his friends enjoyed their lives after retirement from racing. Sadly, Smoky passed away in 2016, one day short of his 30th birthday. His best friend, Aurzel, and her latest rescue horse named Red currently enjoy the acreage and freedom this land provides.

Sunday, March 10, 2019

Infrared thermography could be of value in Endurance contests, say researchers

Horsetalk.co.nz - Full Article

March 10, 2019 Horsetalk.co.nz

Infrared thermography (IRT) may be a useful non-invasive tool to assess physiological stress in endurance horses, according to researchers, who suggest it could prove useful in helping vets decide whether horses are fit to continue.

Veronica Redaelli and her colleagues carried out a pilot study in Italy to see whether IRT could be used as a stress indicator in horses trained for the long-distance discipline.

Their findings were encouraging, prompting the study team to suggest that further studies should be conducted at vet checks during endurance competitions to learn whether eye temperature and the temperature at the crown of the head could help vets decide which animals were OK to continue.

Over the last 30 years, IRT has been widely used in veterinary medicine to detect injury, inflammatory responses, and causes of lameness, such as laminitis, in horses...

Read more here:
https://www.horsetalk.co.nz/2019/03/10/infrared-thermography-endurance-contests/

Saturday, March 09, 2019

Things You Should and Should Not Put on a Horse’s Wound

Thehorse.com - Full Article

Is the ointment you’re using on that cut helping or hurting? Remember these tips when treating horse wounds.

Posted by Alexandra Beckstett, The Horse Managing Editor | Feb 18, 2016

Horse owners and veterinarians have been treating equine wounds for centuries. After all, horses are unabashedly practiced at the art of sustaining wounds. Over the years we’ve tried many different wound ointments and salves, cleansers and dressings, but not all of them are backed by evidence of safety and/or efficacy.

So Dean Hendrickson, DVM, MS, Dipl. ACVS, professor of equine surgery at Colorado State University, in Fort Collins, went back to basics, describing effective and ineffective wound-cleaning agents to an audience of veterinarians at the 2015 Annual American Association of Equine Practitioners Convention, held Dec. 5-9, in Las Vegas.

Although our intentions are good, “most wound-cleaning agents and techniques will cause chemical or mechanical trauma to the wound bed,” he said. “Weigh the benefits of cleaning the wound against the trauma that agent will cause...”

Read more here:
https://thehorse.com/17070/things-you-should-and-should-not-put-on-a-horses-wound/?fbclid=IwAR1e-0Zehi349oQ9HsHM_LFKR4KDQQm4Xp3xuI7uszI7_DHYQPA4X7RGeSM

Thursday, March 07, 2019

War horses: Syria's Arabian beauties plod way to recovery

YahooNews.com - Full Article

Maher al-Mounes
AFP • March 3, 2019

Damascus (AFP) - A shadow of her former self after years of war, 11-year-old Arabian mare Karen stands quietly as a Syrian vet gently pushes a syringe into her pale grey neck.

"Karen used to be the beauty queen of all horses," says the vet, Ahmad Sharida.

But inside her stable near Damascus today, her hips jut out viciously from her overgrown speckled coat.

Weak and withdrawn, Karen is unable to even whinny.

After almost eight years of war, she is one of dozens of Arabian horses from all over Syria recovering from the physical and psychological trauma of the fighting.

Prized for their beauty, endurance and speed, Arabian purebreds are one of the oldest horse breeds in the world.

In Syria, Bedouins have bred them in the north of the country for centuries, seeking to maintain the purity of the local bloodlines.

Before the conflict, Sharida had proudly watched Karen grow from a long-legged foal into a graceful equine beauty.

"I know her very well. I was the one who brought her out of her mother's belly," says the vet, a stethoscope hanging around his neck.

But he lost sight of Karen after she was stolen from her stable in Eastern Ghouta in 2012, the same year rebels overran the region northeast of Damascus.

The area suffered five years of regime bombardment, as well as food and medicine shortages under a crippling siege, before Russia-backed government forces took it back last year.

Sharida had long fled his home region but returned to search for missing Arabian horses and immediately recognised Karen when he found her in October...

Read more here:
https://news.yahoo.com/war-horses-syrias-arabian-beauties-plod-way-recovery-035714738.html?soc_src=hl-viewer&soc_trk=fb&fbclid=IwAR3GLIVFr5miawLERNC8IkvHAdr6gRkRYbUntWHp6QC9GKIJ1c0OzFahUYY

Thursday, February 28, 2019

Wednesday, February 27, 2019

Book Review: The Rough Magic Of The Mongol Derby

Dunwoody photo
ThoroughbredDailyNews.com - Full Review


Friday, February 22, 2019

By Kelsey Riley

“Why do humans put so much thought into some decisions, yet plunge into others like cavalier penguins?”

This was 19-year-old Lara Prior-Palmer’s revelation after a day spent poking around Google for inspiration in June of 2013 led her to the application page for the Mongol Derby. It was seven weeks out from the world’s longest and toughest horse race, most of the other 40-odd riders had been training for a year, and she didn’t have nearly enough money to cover the entry fee. Yet, there is something intensely captivating about that far off, wild landscape and its horses and people, and so, wildly unprepared, Lara hit the big red ‘apply’ button.

I can attest to that feeling of wonderment and that urge to recklessly dive in head-first despite the odds of success-or even survival–looking incredibly unlikely; four years after Lara, it was me clicking that apply button, despite having never in my life camped or used GPS navigation, and having not been on the back of a horse in three years. Hell, I didn’t even know if I still enjoyed or was capable of riding, but something about the very thought of the Mongol Derby is absolutely intoxicating.

Rough Magic, set to be released in May, is Lara Prior-Palmer’s debut book and her memoir of becoming the youngest-ever person and first woman to win the Mongol Derby...

Read more here:
http://www.thoroughbreddailynews.com/book-review-the-rough-magic-of-the-mongol-derby/

Tuesday, February 26, 2019

California: Camelot Equestrian Park offers donations to Camp Fire victims

Chicoer.com - Full Artice

By Kayla Fitzgerald | kfitzgerald@chicoer.com | Chico Enterprise-Record
February 25, 2019 at 4:52 am

OROVILLE — The Camelot Equestrian Park in Oroville is offering various horse supplies to people affected by the Camp Fire.

Connie Andrusaitis is a volunteer at Camelot and for the Butte Valley Pony Club. She has been present for giving out donations every weekend since Nov. 24.

After the fire, Andrusaitis and some members of the Butte Valley Pony Club came together and started gathering donations and it took off from there.

“Several of us in the pony club said gather up all of the halters and lead ropes you can find because we’re going to need them for the horses coming off of the hill and it kind of just grew from there,” Andrusaitis said...

Read more here



Friday, February 22, 2019

Great Britain: New guidance on the movement of horses and other equines in a no deal Brexit scenario

Gov.uk

The government has issued guidance for owners of equines on the preparations they need to make

Published 21 February 2019
From:
Department for Environment, Food & Rural Affairs and David Rutley MP

The Government has today issued guidance for owners of horses, ponies and other equines on the preparations they need to made in the event of a ‘no deal’ Brexit.

Leaving the EU with a deal remains the Government’s top priority. This has not changed. We are continuing with our ‘no deal’ preparations to ensure the country is prepared for every eventuality.

The guidance will help owners to navigate the new processes for moving horses and other equine animals from the UK to EU member states. This will also apply to those owners who currently move their animals between the UK, Ireland and France under the Tripartite Agreement (TPA) – an agreement relied on by many in the horseracing industry and the competition sector.

If the UK leaves the EU on 29 March without a deal:

equines travelling from the UK to the EU may need to undergo additional blood tests, which will need to be carried out within 30 days or less of travelling to satisfy EU regulations
owners will need to consult with a vet at least six weeks before they are planning to travel
all equines will need an Export Health Certificate in order to travel to EU states, instead of current documents, and will need to enter the EU via a Border Inspection Post (BIP)
some equines will also need a Government issued travel ID document, as well as their existing equine passport
The UK has already committed to allowing continued movement on all equine animals from EU member states to support the industries that rely on these animals and ahead of major horseracing events, such as the Grand National Festival at Aintree.

The government is continuing to negotiate with the European Commission on securing listed status for the UK, which would enable the continued movement of equines to EU member states.

The guidance published today is designed to give the owners of horses and other equine animals as much time to prepare for these new processes and factor in any extra travel time they may require when travelling to and from the EU.

Animal Welfare Minister David Rutley said:

Delivering a negotiated deal with the EU remains the Government’s top priority, but it is our job to responsibly ensure we are prepared for all scenarios, including no deal.

This guidance will help businesses and owners prepare for life after 29 March if we do leave without a deal. However, it is in the interest of the EU to reciprocate our commitment on the movement of horses. This will ensure horseracing and competition events across the continent can continue to be attended by all of Europe’s top equine talent.

Julian Richmond Watson, Chairman of the Thoroughbred Breeders Association, said:

The British thoroughbred racing and breeding industry welcomes publication of this important guidance and will be communicating it to our participants to help them prepare for all potential Brexit negotiation outcomes.

We fully support the Government’s welcome and pragmatic position to allow continued equine movement under current systems from EU member states to the UK in a no deal scenario.

Nick Fellows, Chief Executive of the British Equestrian Federation (BEF), said:

The BEF has worked closely with government and leading figures in equestrian sport to make sure that all horse owners have as much information as possible for when the UK leaves the European Union. It’s important to prepare for all eventualities and we’d urge all horse owners to take notice of the material provided by Defra.

If the UK is not provided with listed status by the European Commission, no movements of equines from the UK to the EU will be possible after we leave the EU until listed status is secured.

Businesses that may be affected should read the latest guidance on equine movements.

Wednesday, February 20, 2019

Presidents on Horseback

WhiteHouseHistory.org - Full Article

Military heroes who risked their lives in devotion to the nation have long been attractive presidential candidates. The image of a uniformed officer on a warhorse was a powerful symbol of leadership and executive ability. Presidents depicted in equestrian art include military heroes such as George Washington, Andrew Jackson, William Henry Harrison, Zachary Taylor, Franklin Pierce, Ulysses S. Grant, Rutherford B. Hayes, James A. Garfield, and Benjamin Harrison. Warhorses like Taylor’s Old Whitey and Grant’s Egypt and Cincinnati enjoyed honored retirement at the White House.

With the invention of photography and the popularity of illustrated magazines and newspapers in the late nineteenth century, images of the presidents posed on horseback became a staple for photojournalists. Pictures of the chief executive and their families on horseback became a familiar subject for posed photographs. President and first ladies regularly rode horses for exercise and relaxation in public both in the city parks of Washington, D.C., and on vacation. This practice changed after World War II transformed security procedures...

Read more here:
https://www.whitehousehistory.org/presidents-on-horseback?utm_medium=40digest.7days3.20190219.home&utm_source=email&utm_content=&utm_campaign=campaign

Sunday, February 17, 2019

Is Muscle Disease is Contributing to a Horse’s Poor Performance?

Thehorse.com - Full Article

Attention to certain details during exams and careful consideration of test results can help a veterinarian arrive at a diagnosis, making way for an appropriate management.

Posted by Erica Larson, News Editor | Feb 16, 2019

Lack of energy under saddle, a poor attitude during exercise, chronic back pain, hollowing over jumps. These are all possible signs of low-grade or chronic muscle disease, which can be difficult to diagnose. But one researcher reports that attention to certain details and careful consideration of test results can help a veterinarian arrive at a diagnosis, making way for an appropriate management.

At the 2018 American Association of Equine Practitioners Convention, held Dec. 2-5 in San Francisco, California, Stephanie Valberg, DVM, PhD, Dipl. ACVIM, ACVSMR, the Mary Anne McPhail Dressage Chair in Equine Sports Medicine at the Michigan State University’s College of Veterinary Medicine, in East Lansing, reviewed how she determines whether muscle disease is behind a horse’s poor performance...

Read more here:
https://thehorse.com/166342/is-muscle-disease-is-contributing-to-a-horses-poor-performance/

Thursday, February 14, 2019

Meet the 'Horse Barber' creating spectacular equine designs

Cnn.com - Full Story and photos

By Ben Church, CNN
Updated 7:55 AM ET, Tue February 12, 2019

(CNN)By combining her two passions, Melody Hames produces some of the most unexpected and spectacular designs in the equine world.
Dubbed the "Horse Barber," the design graduate has set up her own business clipping creative artwork into the hair of horses.
"They've all got a unique meaning," Hames told CNN Sport. "I've always been into art and design anyway so I love to do it..."

Read and see more at:
https://www.cnn.com/2019/02/12/sport/horse-barber-clipping-art-winning-post-spt-intl/index.html

Wednesday, February 13, 2019

ROC the Standardbred launches ambassador program

USTrottingNews.com

February 11, 2019, by Alyssa Hedges, for ROC the Standardbred

The group, founded by Alyssa Hedges in 2015, started on Facebook to connect Standardbred lovers and has since grown in size and mission. ROC the Standardbred has formed a board and applied for 501(c)3 not-for-profit recognition. The group’s primary mission is to create a market for Standardbreds as a pleasure horse and their breed ambassador program was designed to help them reach that goal.

Their 2019 lineup features 16 horse and rider teams that include the following:
• a pony-Standardbred cross to multi-million dollar winner Golden Receiver;
• horses aged 5 – 21;
• bays to greys to chestnuts;
• three blind-in-one-eye horses;
• some who raced and others who didn’t make it to the track;
• adoptees to those who never left their race family; and
• riders age 15 and up.

Teams are located throughout New York, Ohio, New Jersey, Maryland and even Canada. They will be found doing everything from barrel racing, to dressage, to hunter/jumpers, to mounted archery and even RUS. Aiming to prove just how versatile Standardbreds are, the team is excited to share the breed with the horse world. The ultimate goal is to drive up adoption rates from Standardbred rescues/transition programs and also to give those in the business alternative options for selling horses retiring from the track.

To keep up on all of the action, you can join ROC the Standardbred’s Facebook group or follow them on Instagram!

Website – www.rocthestandardbred.org
Facebook – www.facebook.com/groups/ROCtheStandardbred
Instagram – @rocthestandardbred

Tuesday, February 12, 2019

Great Britain: Rider who lost horse to Cushing’s diagnosed with the same condition

Horseandhound.co.uk - Full Article

Sarah Radford
11 February, 2019 07:06

When celebrity portrait photographer Lucy Sewill’s much-loved endurance mare had to be put down as a result of Cushing’s, she had a sudden realisation — she was suffering from the condition herself.

Horses have been part of Lucy’s life since childhood and her passion for them was reflected in her 2016 book Horses and Humans, which featured equestrian celebrities William Fox-Pitt and Chilli Morning, Kelly Marks and American Pie, Monty Roberts and Shy Boy and Dickie Waygood.

Lucy is a believer in the “special bond between horses and humans”, which she said helped her find the answer to debilitating symptoms that had plagued her for years.

“The relationships we have with our horses are so life-enhancing,” she said. ”The way animals and humans relate is extraordinary — including highlighting things that are wrong with us.”

An FEI endurance rider, Lucy had previously completed 100-mile rides with her 23-year-old Anglo-Arab Nutcracker. The mare had been enjoying a quieter life — although still “fit, athletic and active” — when she suffered a dramatic onset of symptoms...

Read more at https://www.horseandhound.co.uk/news/rider-lost-horse-cushings-diagnosed-condition-678875#AYogKjC2u6djsekE.99

Understanding Antioxidant Supplements for Horses

KER.com - Full Article

April 25, 2017
By Kentucky Equine Research Staff

Many owners offer their horses antioxidant supplements. In some cases, this might be without a solid understanding of what antioxidants do and how they benefit horses. To better appreciate how oxygen is both vital and dangerous to a horse’s body and the role antioxidants play in combating “oxidative stress,” take this short, 10-point crash course on understanding antioxidants.

1. Oxygen is 100% essential for almost all living creatures. Inhaled oxygen drives metabolic processes and helps cells produce energy.

2. In typical Jekyll and Hyde style, some oxygen molecules form damaging “reactive oxygen species” (ROS) while producing energy. These molecules are also called free radicals...

Read more here:
KER.com

Friday, February 08, 2019

Getting Properly Hitched

USRider.org - Full Article

The proper marriage of your trailer and truck revolves around understanding trailer hitches-and the important function they serve in the hauling process.

By Equus | 1/31/2019

You're considering towing your horses. One of the most confusing and scary aspects of this adventure is the myriad kinds of trailer hitches available to buy. It might seem like there are hundreds. In reality, there are only a handful, but they come in a large variety of sizes and capacities.

Of course, you want to select the right hitch, not only so it matches your trailer's coupler, but-probably most importantly-so that it has adequate capacity to safely carry the full weight of your horses and any additional loads.

Glossary of Terms
To start, let's define some terms you'll need to know to discuss hitches and towing with hitch and trailer retailers...

Read more here.

Thursday, February 07, 2019

Great Britain: Cyclist found guilty after hitting horse and rider during Windsor triathlon

Horseandhound.co.uk - Full Article and Video

Becky Murray
28 January, 2019

A cyclist has been convicted after a horse and rider were hit during a triathlon.

Iain Plumb, 32, of Chaucer Road, Crowthorne, Berkshire, was found guilty of one count of riding a cycle on a road without reasonable consideration for others following the incident which happened during the Windsor triathlon on 17 June 2018.

The rider, Jennifer Katherine, shared hat camera footage of a number of cyclists undertaking her which has receieved more than five million views. She said one of the cyslists hit her and her horse, causing him to jump sideways and pull off a hind shoe, but the cyclist did not stop...

Read more at https://www.horseandhound.co.uk/news/cyclist-found-guilty-hitting-horse-rider-windsor-triathlon-677714#HBm1q01fmgTyhM1k.99

Wednesday, February 06, 2019

Starch in Horse Diets

Thehorse.com - Full Article

Although it can be damaging if fed improperly, starch can be an important part of horse diets. Here’s what you should know.

Posted by Kristen M. Janicki, MS, PAS | Feb 4, 2019

Starch is a highly digestible energy form and can provide horses with energy they need for exercise, growth, metabolism, and other life functions. However, when fed improperly, this nonstructural carbohydrate can be detrimental to your horse’s health.

Most of the energy contained in grains, such as corn and oats, and a percentage of the energy from forage is starch. During digestion, starch is broken down primarily in the horse’s small intestine by an enzyme called amylase. This process efficiently produces glucose, a type of simple sugar essential for fueling some bodily functions.

The amount of starch consumed at one time also affects the amount of starch digested in the small intestine...

Read more here:
https://thehorse.com/118110/starch-in-horse-diets/

Tuesday, February 05, 2019

Bahrain: Amazing charm of a royal welcome at the endurance village

NewsOfBahrain.com - Full Article

SAMIRA DANOUNI
OP-ED - FEBRUARY 04, 2019

Growing up in an urban setting and amid high rise buildings, the only things I knew about horses were scenes of John Wayne riding rhythmically and at times gloriously on his black, brown or white steeds striding out in the open desert, or of Zorro’s black Tornado adroitly evading being caught. The equine characters that populated the Little House on the prairie were also a source of fascination for me as I was discovering, thanks to our television set, a world that was vastly different from mine.

I never had the chance to be physically close to horses, so although they looked recognisable enough to me and I could tell the difference between a dignified trot and a full out gallop, they remained fascinating, but mysterious creatures. My first close contact with real horses was in February 2005 when as a teacher at Bahrain School, I was amazingly lucky to be able to arrange a trip for students to the Royal Stables thanks to a kind invitation from Tawfiq Salehi, the head of the media office of HH Shaikh Nasser bin Hamad Al Khalifa.

Tawfiq, Bu Ahmed as he is called, was a real gentleman and made it effortlessly easy for us to visit the stables where we had the immense pleasure of meeting HH Shaikh Nasser and his brothers HH Shaikh Khalid and HH Shaikh Faisal, may God rest his soul in eternal peace. They took us into the world of horses, providing us with information that we all took in with great anticipation, so eager we were to comprehend the nature of these lovely, harmless and intriguing animals. The visit lasted about four hours and its effects on us were enormous...

Read more here:
http://www.newsofbahrain.com/op-ed/50895.html

Wednesday, January 30, 2019

To scratch or pat, that is the question

Wahetondailynews.com - Full Article

by Lori Ricigliano Jan 26, 2019

Have you ever wondered if your horse prefers to be scratched or patted as a reward? Well, a group of scientists in England had just that thought. The issue of patting versus scratching hadn’t been previously addressed in scientific studies, so Dr. Sara Redgate and Emily Handcock, Msc. of Nottingham Trent University in Nottingham, United Kingdom decided to see if scratching the horses’ withers (withers are located at the top of the shoulder at the base of the horse’s neck) could potentially increase horse/human bonding and act as a more effective reward. Hancock noted, “Scratching is a natural behavior among horses, whereas patting is not. Riders and handlers should be encouraged to scratch rather than pat their horses as a reward.”

To test their theory, they observed 16 horse/rider combinations at the Grand Prix Special dressage test of the 2012 Olympic games in London. Overall, patting their horse dominated any other type of non-aid given contact by the riders. The reactions of the horses indicated 34 percent of the horses displayed visible behavioral reactions, for example: speeding up their movements when they received the pats. Those that received scratching rewards stayed calmer and moved less.

The scientists then investigated the effects of patting versus wither-scratching in 10 riding school horses. In this study, the handlers patted each horse for 30 seconds four times. They then scratched their withers four times for the same time period. The team recorded heart rate and behavior on all the horses...

Read more here:
https://www.wahpetondailynews.com/community/to-scratch-or-pat-that-is-the-question/article_4a8af542-2114-11e9-96cf-87f68d6b83de.html?fbclid=IwAR0zsVziuWb_rWWS8_1dZkjeKZduewWARx2HZmOxVzbwCS0dX5d8NtXCZpo