Thursday, May 23, 2019

Check Horses’ Alfalfa Hay for Blister Beetles

Thehorse.com - Full Article

BLISTER BEETLES IN ALFALFA CAN BE DEADLY. HERE’S WHAT TO WATCH FOR AND HOW TO KEEP YOUR HORSES HEALTHY.

Posted by Kristen M. Janicki, MS, PAS | May 20, 2019

It might be hard to imagine that an essential part of the horse’s diet could contain potentially deadly hidden toxins. But it’s a hard truth that horse owners must be aware of: Alfalfa hay can harbor blister beetles (Epicauta spp), which can contain a harmful toxic substance called cantharidin.

A member of the Meloidae family, blister beetles live throughout the United States and Canada. Their average body length is about 0.3 to 1.3 inches. A blister beetle’s diet is mainly composed of pollen, blossoms, and leaves of flowering plants, making alfalfa the perfect meal for them. Most alfalfa infestation occurs during late summer and early fall, when the adult blister beetle population also peaks.

Male blister beetles produce a natural defense toxin called cantharidin. This irritant can cause blisters on skin (of both horses and humans) within a few hours of contact, hence the insect’s name. When ingested, cantharidin is lethal in horses with as little as half a milligram per kilogram of body weight, equivalent to consumption of around 125 beetles for an average-sized horse. And it’s not just the live insects that are harmful: The toxin is still effective long after the beetle dies...

Read more here:
https://thehorse.com/112252/check-horses-alfalfa-hay-for-blister-beetles/

Tuesday, May 21, 2019

Risk - by Irish Horse

Trails-and-trials-with-major Blog - Full Story

May 12 2019
by Irish Horse

A very sad event happened on a local trail: a horse tried to turn on a very narrow trail, lost it's footing, and slid down the side, where it broke it's leg. It had to be euthanized. This is a tragedy for horse and rider, and I have nothing but sympathy for them. There were posts wondering what trail it was, and I realized this is a trail I ride weekly. I never thought this section was particularly dangerous, but it sadly was for that horse.

Some folks called for the trail to be closed, some for it to be inspected, (which was done, and it was determined it wasn't any worse than other parts of the trail), and some remarked that horses and riding are inherently risky activities. There was a comment that all of our trails should be brought up to a higher safety standard. While great in theory, that would literally mean about 95% of the trail in question (Pioneer Express) and probably 85% of the Tevis trail (just to name a few!) would be deemed unsafe.

This brought up many different, and sometimes conflicting, ideas in my head. I DID almost slide down a (even steeper) cliff alongside the trail myself earlier this year. Luckily my athletic horse saved us. It could have gone very wrong. Maybe I should have been paying more attention to exactly where he places his feet, and riding more aggressively, but I do let Major pick the trail most of the time. Will I be more attentive in those steep sections after that? Most certainly!...

Read more here:
http://trails-and-trials-with-major.blogspot.com/2019/05/risk.html

Monday, May 20, 2019

The Long Haul to a New Home

Horseandrider.com - Full Article

A cross-country move—with a horse—is a lot to take on. Whether you’ve accepted the job of your dreams or are moving closer to family, these 12 tips will help you plan and execute a successful relocation of your horse.


KATIE NAVARRAFEB 23, 2018

Nearly a decade ago, Megan Carter and her then-12-year-old Arabian gelding, Amigo, prepared for a long trek from Juneau, Alaska, to the Eastern Seaboard. The climate and culture of upstate New York was a stark contrast of her native Alaska, but provided a once-in-a-lifetime career opportunity. But after 10 years, it was time for Carter and Amigo to return home.

“I answered the call of the eagles and decided it was time to follow my heart and return home to be with my family and friends,” she says.

In less than six weeks, Carter orchestrated a 4,000-mile relocation for herself and the now 22-year-old Amigo. Her eight-day trip crossed 12 states, the Continental Divide, and the Mississippi and Missouri Rivers, and traveled through international waters. Travel by land culminated in Bellingham, Washington. There are no roads connecting Juneau to the rest of Alaska—or even the rest of North America. That meant the final three days of the journey were aboard a ferry boat.

It wasn’t the pair’s first cross-country experience, but a lot had changed in horse relocation since they’d left Alaska. Carter relied on her tried-and-true strategies from her first adventure and learned a few more. Here she offers 12 tips to make your cross-country—and even cross-water—excursion more comfortable for you and horse...

Read more here.

Sunday, May 19, 2019

History rides in on horseback

LMTribune.com - Full Article

Nez Perce Tribe’s famed Appaloosa horses among stars of Culture Day

May 19 2019
By ERIC BARKER of the Tribune

SPALDING — Nez Perce riders dressed in full regalia and sitting astride their beautiful Appaloosa horses rode into the Nez Perce National Historic Park Saturday morning.

The dappled sunshine flooding through the trees at the park matched the distinctive spots for which the horses are known as the riders circled an event tent at Culture Day.

Joe Lewis, of Spokane and vice president of the Nez Perce Appaloosa Horse Club, said the breed that was developed by the Nez Perce Tribe in the 1700s is known for its endurance and strength. Lewis is a great-great grandson of Ollokot, a Nez Perce leader and key figure in the War of 1877, and brother of Chief Joseph...

Read more here:
https://lmtribune.com/northwest/history-rides-in-on-horseback/article_44571775-3319-541f-97b1-7529754067b7.html

Friday, May 10, 2019

Suited to Endurance?

DistanceRidersOfManitoba.ca - Full Article

April 25, 2019 by Darice Whyte

I sold one of my beautiful Arabian mares recently. I have owned Shalimar Cierra Rose for 10 years and during that time I tried to make her into an endurance horse. Despite my best attempts it just wasn’t her forte. I could tell she was thinking “how much further is this crazy lady going to ride me?”

She certainly wasn’t a 50 mile horse and she had way more whoa than go. She preferred to show me how well she could jump logs on the trail than race down the trail.

Someone once said to me “they can’t all be endurance horses you know”. I thought he was referring to other breeds. Not an Arabian! But yes, he was right. You just can’t fit a square peg into a round hole. Sometimes it just doesn’t work even if it is an Arabian...

Read more here:
http://www.distanceridersofmanitoba.ca/DRM/2019/04/25/suited-to-endurance/

Equine Colic Imitators

TheHorse.com - Full Article

MANY OTHER CONDITIONS BESIDES COLIC CAN CAUSE COLICLIKE SIGNS. AND AS WITH COLIC, DELAYED TREATMENT OR MISDIAGNOSIS CAN HAVE SERIOUS CONSEQUENCES. HERE’S WHAT YOU NEED TO KNOW.

Posted by Alexandra Beckstett, The Horse Managing Editor | Apr 22, 2019

IS IT ABDOMINAL PAIN OR SOMETHING ELSE?

Discover your horse restless, pawing, and lying down repeatedly in his stall, and you might immediately think, “He’s colicking.”

Nine times out of 10, you’re probably right. But it’s important to understand that many, many other conditions besides colic can cause coliclike signs. And as with colic, delayed treatment or misdiagnosis can have serious consequences.

“For many of these conditions, if you were to inadvertently take a horse to (exploratory colic) surgery, you might very well might make the animal worse, not to mention spend a lot of money unnecessarily,” says Barbara Dallap Schaer, VMD, Dipl. ACVS, ACVECC, associate professor of emergency medicine and critical care at the University of Pennsylvania School of Veterinary Medicine, in Kennett Square.

Dealing With Equine Colic: Here are 33 Do's and Don'ts
RELATED RESOURCE: Dealing With Equine Colic: Here are 33 Do’s and Don’ts

Veterinarians define colic as abdominal pain or discomfort—something she says is critical for owners to understand. The classic signs of a horse with colic are many...

Read more here:
https://thehorse.com/157326/equine-colic-imitators/

Thursday, May 09, 2019

Should I Wrap an Abscessed Hoof?

TheHorse.com - Full Article

Dr. Britt Conklin offers suggestions on how to keep an abscessed hoof clean.

Posted by Britt Conklin, DVM | Apr 16, 2019

Q. My horse recently had a deep abscess in her hoof and a friend advised me to keep the hoof wrapped for a bit to prevent bacteria from getting trapped into the hole as it heals. Is this a good practice? And how long should I keep her hoof wrapped?
—Via email

A.Abscesses are simply pressurized pockets of bacteria, fungi, or dying tissue that expand and travel along the path of least resistance in the foot. They’re frequently found in the epidermal layers of the wall, sole, or frog but can migrate along planes into dermal or deeper tissues when the path of least resistance drives them that direction...

Read more here:
https://thehorse.com/112599/should-i-wrap-an-abscessed-hoof/

Tuesday, May 07, 2019

Cooling a hot horse

MelNewton.com - Full Article

May 5 2019
by Mel Newton

Here’s a highly simplified and barely scientific explanation of why it’s important to cool a hot horse during a vet check at an endurance ride.

It boils down to this simple concept:

Blood has lots of jobs to do in the horse’s body. Once your horse is standing in the vet check, the blood has two choice – cool the body by going to the skin and releasing heat, or go to the GI system and absorb water, calories and electrolytes. There’s only so much blood to go around, so if it’s busy cooling your horse down, it won’t be helping the digestion system move around and do its thing. You gotta help your horse cool so the blood can prioritize the digestion system!...

Read more here:
http://melnewton.com/2019/cooling-a-hot-horse/?fbclid=IwAR3u_PIyja4_vYMkoL_jnP93TXqtQQuzZ4sxJjcDgZ19ZdqG-Yojdwu1A50

Monday, May 06, 2019

Morgan horses are an American original

LeaderTelegram.com - Full Article

May 6 2019
By Carol Watson Correspondent

The Morgan horse has proven its worth in a variety of equine disciplines, including dressage, show jumping and driving. Known for its speed, courage and gentle nature, the Morgan also is America’s first native breed.

An unusual beginning
In 1789, a Middleton, Vt., schoolteacher named Justin Morgan acquired a small colt in payment for a debt. Giving him the name of Figure, the colt’s pedigree was uncertain, although there was some evidence to suggest that he was sired by English Thoroughbred True Briton. (a.k.a. Beautiful Bay).

Standing just 14 hands high, Figure was fast and smart with so much speed and stamina that he could out-pull a draft horse and outrun the speediest racer. Stories of his exploits spread throughout New England, and Figure was soon in demand for his stud services.

Known for his prepotency, Figure passed on his good looks and abilities to his progeny, including three of his sons — Bulrush, Sherman and Woodbury. They would become the foundation bloodstock of the Morgan breed.

In his later years, Figure was put out to pasture, although he did have one final moment of glory when he was chosen to carry then-President James Monroe on a July 1817 muster-day parade in Montpelier, Vt.

Four years later, Figure died at the age of 32 from the kick of another horse on the Levi Bean Farm in Tunbridge, Vt. He is buried on that farm under a a large gray stone just 15 miles away from the grave of his namesake and first owner, Justin Morgan...

Read more here:
https://www.leadertelegram.com/country-today/horses/morgan-horses-are-an-american-original/article_7ff9a3e3-0b99-52c5-b8cd-4db685632c93.html