Friday, August 17, 2018

Riders4Helmets International Helmet Awareness Day 2018 Set to Break Records

Riders4Helmets.com

July 21, 2018 by lyndsey

The 2018 Event is On Track To Have More Than 700 Participating Retailers in 19 Countries

Six hundred retailers in 17 countries have already registered to participate in the ninth Riders4Helmets International Helmet Awareness Day, to be held August 18th and 19th. With two weeks to go before the event, Riders4Helmets is on track to exceed the 680 retailers in 19 countries that participated in 2017, with 20% more retailers having already registered than by the same time last year.

“It is a testament to the continued need for educating equestrians on all aspects of helmet wearing that sees this year’s event on track to be our biggest event to date,” said Lyndsey White, Riders4Helmets. “I am absolutely overwhelmed at the continued support shown to the Riders4Helmets campaign by helmet manufacturers, retailers, and equestrians around the globe.”

“Back in 2010 when Riders4Helmets was founded and we hosted the first International Helmet Awareness Day, I never imagined that the campaign would inspire tens of thousands of equestrians to wear a helmet for the first time, and serve as a continued reminder to those who were already wearing a helmet, to ensure it is fitted correctly and that they replace it when appropriate.”

Riders4Helmets.com has teamed up with 22 helmet manufacturers this year, that will offer discounts on their helmets for two days only, via their global retailer network. The helmet brands that have committed involvement are Champion, Charles Owen, Dublin, EQ3 by Back On Track Canada, Eurohunter, Gatehouse, GPA, International Riding Helmets (IRH), Jin Stirrup, JPC, Kask, KEP Italia, Kwesta, LAS helmets (Leslie Sutcliffe UK), One K, Ovation, Samshield America, Tipperary, Trauma Void, Troxel, Uvex and Zilco.

Retailers in Australia, Canada, Denmark, England, Ireland, Italy, Netherlands, New Zealand, Poland, Scotland, South Africa, Spain, USA, and Zambia have already registered to participate in this year’s event.

International Helmet Awareness Day was founded in 2010 as a direct result of US Olympian Courtney King Dye’s accident, with the aim of educating equestrians on the benefits of wearing a properly fitting, secured and certified helmet.

Retailers around the globe who wish to register to participate in the event may register free of charge at this link and will then be added to the participating retailer map. Only retailers who register with riders4helmets will be eligible for restocking discounts from the participating helmet brands (please note – participating brands vary by country). You must register with riders4helmets and not with the helmet brands. Further information for retailers and rules with regards to participating can be found at this link.

Equestrians may visit this link to learn more about International Helmet Awareness Day and can search for participating retailers by “Name” or “Geographic Location”. Equestrians are encouraged to visit the site on August 18th and 19th, 2018, to view the most current update, as participating retailers will continue to be added on a daily basis.

For more information on the Riders4Helmets campaign and more information on rider safety, visit www.riders4helmets.com. You can also follow the campaign at www.facebook.com/riders4helmets, www.instagram.com/riders4helmets, and www.twitter.com/riders4helmets.

Media Contact:
Lyndsey White
lyndsey@equiseen.com

Wednesday, August 15, 2018

Feeding the Ulcer-Prone Horse

Thehorse.com - Full Article

Learn how to craft a diet for the horse with painful lesions in his stomach.

By Kristen M. Janicki, MS, PAS | Aug 13, 2018

How to craft a diet for the horse with painful lesions in his stomach
Which horses would you traditionally consider “ulcer-prone”? Racehorses in training? Western pleasure horses showing competitively on the American Quarter Horse Association circuit? Pony Clubbers’ games ponies? Injured horses on stall rest? Truth is, you could be right with any one of these.

Equine gastric ulcer syndrome (EGUS) can plague any age, breed, or sex, and the risk factors are many—certain types of training and exercise, nutrition, feeding practices, and stabling, to name a few. Let’s take a look at one very important aspect of preventing and managing ulcers: diet...

Read more here:
https://thehorse.com/19510/feeding-the-ulcer-prone-horse/

Sunday, August 12, 2018

Dramas in the saddle: Encountering a crazy, chaotic world

Horsetalk.co.nz - Full Article

August 9, 2018 CuChullaine O’Reilly

Armed escorts, roadside shootings, searing temperatures, chaotic traffic and mind-blowing bureaucracy. Despite it all, Filipe Leite completed a two-year 10,000-mile journey on horseback from Canada to Brazil. He chronicles his journey in his new book, Long Ride Home. The founder of the Long Riders’ Guild, CuChullaine O’Reilly, talks to Filipe about his remarkable journey, and the many challenges the Long Rider describes in his new book, which even included the need to befriend drug lords to get through.

You contacted the Long Riders’ Guild is 2011 in search of advice on how to make an equestrian journey from Canada to Brazil. You subsequently completed a 10,000-mile ride that lasted two years and took you and your horses through 10 countries. Can you explain how a childhood story sparked your desire to become a Long Rider?

The first story I can remember as a child is Tschiffely’s epic equestrian journey across the Americas. In the beginning of my book, Long Ride Home, I explain how I was a very scared child and when my dad turned off the lights in my room, many nights I cried, afraid of the dark. My dad would come in and tell me a part of the book Tschiffely’s Ride and use it as an example of how fear is a monster we create in our minds that we must learn to push aside. I loved the story so much. I remember sitting on my horse as a kid imagining what it would be like to cross all of those countries with the same animals. I spent the rest of my life dreaming of going on my own Long Ride...“

Read more here:
https://www.horsetalk.co.nz/2018/08/09/dramas-saddle-crazy-chaotic-world/

Thursday, August 09, 2018

Senate Passes One-Year ELD Extension for Livestock Haulers

Drovers.com - Full Article

Wyatt Bechtel
August 2, 2018

An amendment added to the Senate’s “minibus” spending bill would grant livestock haulers another year-long extension to implement Electronic Logging Devices (ELD).

The amendment was proposed by Senator Deb Fischer (R-Neb.) to delay implementation of the ELD mandate until Sept. 30, 2019. Fischer says the legislation is important because livestock haulers face different challenges from other transporters who are currently using an ELD under regulations from the Department of Transportation.

“With this extension, we will have more time to bring common-sense to these rules and provide additional flexibility,” Fischer says...

Read more here:
https://www.drovers.com/article/senate-passes-one-year-eld-extension-livestock-haulers

Monday, August 06, 2018

Veterinary Toxicologist Warns of Blue-Green Algae Dangers

Thehorse.com - Full Article

Health problems can arise when animals—including horses—and people come into contact with the various toxins produced by blue-green algae.

By Edited Press Release | Jul 8, 2018

Summertime is known for its heat. Add some rainy days to the mix, and this combination can be the recipe for the development of blue-green algae, says a toxicologist at the Kansas State Veterinary Diagnostic Laboratory, a part of Kansas State University’s College of Veterinary Medicine, in Manhattan.

Also known as cyanobacteria, blue-green algae can bloom in fresh water where environmental conditions—warm weather, lots of sunlight and the presence of nutrients in the water, which often are the result of agricultural runoff—make it possible for these organisms to grow and replicate rapidly.

Steve Ensley, DVM, PhD, a clinical veterinary toxicologist at Kansas State, said health problems can arise when animals—including horses—and people come into contact with the various toxins produced by cyanobacteria...

Read more here:
https://thehorse.com/159222/veterinary-toxicologist-warns-of-blue-green-algae-dangers/

Friday, August 03, 2018

Looking Beyond Frequent Hoof Trimming as the Magic Fix for Hoof Rehab

Easycare blog - Full Article

Tuesday, July 31, 2018 by easycare admin

By Hoof Care Practitioner David Landreville of Landreville Hoof Care

If you’re struggling with hoof issues, don't fool yourself into thinking that merely trimming more frequently is going to be a magic fix. There’s always a learning curve and there are often kinks in that curve.

The key to lameness prevention, rehabilitation, and continued development is keeping the outer wall off of the ground.

To accomplish this, I believe that optimum weight bearing is when the inner wall is loaded at the Four Pillars. I don’t try to make it happen in one trim. It’s built over years of frequent trims. After trimming to the inside of the inner wall, it takes three weeks for the inside of the outer wall to make it to the ground (with this kind of trim), which is why I try to keep them on no more than a 3-week trim schedule. The second and third weeks are the optimum comfort weeks for the horse. The inner wall, through its attachment to the sole, is set up to support the weight of the horse. The strength of the outer wall is not in its ability to support the weight of the horse, but in its ability to contort while simultaneously resisting the forces of contortion.

Frequency is only part of the equation...


Read more here:
http://blog.easycareinc.com/blog/easycare-admin/looking-beyond-frequent-hoof-trimming-as-the-magic-fix-for-hoof-rehab

Wednesday, August 01, 2018

10 Things to Remember on International Helmet Awareness Day

Lexington, KY (July 31, 2018) - The weekend of August 18th and 19th, 2018 marks the ninth annual Riders4Helmets International Helmet Awareness Day — a campaign event designed to educate people about the importance of wearing a hat, following dressage Olympian Courtney King-Dye’s accident from which she suffered a brain injury.

To mark the occasion, the campaign’s Lyndsey White shares 10 important messages that all riders should remember on a daily basis:

• If you have a hard impact blow while wearing your hat, immediately replace it with a new hat. There may be damage to the hat that is not visible to the naked eye.
• Hat manufacturers generally recommend replacing your hat every four to five years. Hats take a beating over time from sweat, heat, dust and rain, and the Styrofoam in the hat relinquishes its ability to protect the head over time. “So, replacing your hat sooner than four to five years may in some circumstance be necessary,” says Lyndsey.
• A ponytail or different hairstyle can affect the fit of your hat. When you try on hats prior to purchase, wear your hair in the style that you expect to wear it when riding.
• If you purchase your hat online, check the date of manufacture. Purchasing a used hat can be very risky and is NOT recommended. The hat may have sustained previous damage that you aren’t able to see.
• There is no statistical correlation between skill level and injury likelihood. Professional riders are just as at risk to sustain injury due to a fall as less frequent riders.
• Even a fall from a standing horse can be catastrophic. Your injury risk depends on the height from which fall, as well as the speed at which you’re traveling.
• Head injuries are cumulative. An original head injury can be made much worse by additional concussions.
• Riding is considered more dangerous than downhill skiing and motorcycling.
• Approximately 20% of accidents which result in head injury happen while the person is on the ground.
• It is best if you invest in your own hat regardless of whether or not you own a horse. “It is a personal purchase. Your hat is designed to fit your head,” says Lyndsey. An incorrectly fitting hat offers very little, to no protection. In addition to wearing a correctly fitting hat, you must have the harness correctly fastened on your hat. If the harness is not fitting snugly, the hat can rotate should you have a fall and it won’t be able to protect your head to its fullest intention.


To celebrate International Helmet Awareness Day, Riders4helmets has teamed up with leading manufacturers to offer special discounts on safety headgear around the globe, via their retailer networks.

Retailers around the globe who wish to register to participate in the event may register free of charge at this link and will then be added to the participating retailer map. Only retailers who register with riders4helmets will be eligible for restocking discounts from the participating helmet brands (please note – participating brands vary by country). You must register directly with riders4helmets and not with the helmet brands. Further information for retailers and rules with regards to participating, can be found at this link.

Equestrians may visit this link to learn more about International Helmet Awareness Day and can search for participating retailers by “Name” or “Geographic Location” on our participating retailer map. Equestrians are encouraged to visit the site on August 18th and 19th, 2018, to view the most current update, as participating retailers will continue to be added on a daily basis.

For more information on the Riders4Helmets campaign and more information on rider safety, visit www.riders4helmets.com. You can also follow the campaign at www.facebook.com/riders4helmets, www.instagram.com/riders4helmets, and www.twitter.com/riders4helmets.

Friday, July 27, 2018

Managing your your horse in the heat- EGB guide

July 27 2018

ENDURANCE GB ADVICE TO KEEP YOU AND YOUR HORSE SAFE IF YOU ARE TRAINING & COMPETING IN WARM OR HOT WEATHER


With horse welfare cemented at the heart of the sport, Endurance GB is committed to educating riders to ensure horse well-being is paramount. With consistently high summer temperatures showing no sign of abating it is important that the necessary steps are taken to ensure horses are managed correctly in the heat.

Recognising high body temperature and the risk to horse welfare is essential for riders and anyone else involved with horses at competitions. There are a number of indicators that a horse is very hot or suffering from heat exhaustion:



Excessive sweating – horse completely covered in sweat and/or sweat running from the body
Whilst they will sweat initially, if severely dehydrated they may have reduced sweating leading to reduced ability to control body temperature
Horse feels very hot to touch and may have prominent blood vessels in the skin
Ataxia (unsteadiness) – especially when stopping after exercise
High or irregular heart rate and respiratory rate
Blowing very hard (deep and laboured breathing)
Panting (fast and shallow breathing)
A high rectal temperature – above 40°C (104°F)
Horse may show little reaction to people or environment or be lethargic
Horse may appear distressed or depressed
Horse becomes colicky
Dark urine and reduced urination
Dark mucous membranes
Muscle spasms
Slow recovery after exercise

Tom Eaton-Evans, 4* FEI Endurance Veterinary Treatment Official, 2* FEI Endurance Official Veterinarian and EGB Welfare Committee Member, team vet for the British Young Riders Endurance team, explains: “Horses are susceptible to heat-related illness whilst being exercised or transported in hot weather. Endurance riders are well practised in keeping their horses cool, but in these hot summer months it is necessary to review the signs to look out for and the actions to take if your horse is overheating.”



Fellow EGB Welfare Committee member, scientific and equine consultant and researcher for FEI and BEF Dr David Marlin shares his expertise on horses at risk in the heat and potential consequences of heat exhaustion: “Older, younger, less fit, dark coloured, unclipped, sick, large and overweight horses will struggle more in the heat. If not managed properly heat exhaustion can quickly progress to heat stroke. If your horse does go down then continue to cool it aggressively and send for a vet! Severe heat stroke/heat exhaustion can lead to renal failure, COLIC, myopathy (muscle damage), laminitis, liver failure and can be fatal if not treated promptly.”

EGB advises that if you suspect your horse is overheating there are measures you should take immediately to help, including:

Stop exercising
Remove the tack
Move your horse out of direct sunlight
Start cooling – this is best achieved with copious amounts of cool water applied all over the horse- if a hose is available use that
If ice is available this can be added to the water to help cool it further
In cases of mild heat stress horses can recover rapidly, however when coupled with dehydration or exhaustion intravenous fluids may be required to help your horse recover in which case a vet will be needed



There are number of things that can be done to reduce the risk of heat exhaustion, David Marlin adds: “Provide water at all times. Don’t remove water. Allow horses to drink immediately before, during and after exercise. If you do put on a sheet then make sure it’s a white one. White material reflects some heat whilst dark colours absorb radiant heat.”

Additional advice includes:



· Travelling Horses lose around 3-5kg per hour. Travelling is tiring, don’t leave horses standing in lorries on hot days.

· Competition – Accept your horse may not be able to achieve the same performance on a hot day.

· Electrolytes – Feed daily in feed according to level of work and weather.

· Warming-up – Cut down warm-up time or break it up and cool if necessary.



Commenting on the recent King Forest event Tom Eaton-Evans said: “The hot weather has been on all riders’ minds for the last few weeks – especially for endurance riders where it represents a particular challenge with horses out in the heat for long periods of time. ‘Crewing’ is an essential part of successful endurance riding and at the Kings Forest ride I was able to watch this in action, resulting in a quiet few days for me in the treatment clinic.



The ride organisers had ensured enough water was available for all competitors (with buckets to decant the water from the troughs to prevent infection risk), ice on hand that helped cool the water in the heat of the day and ride stables were wonderfully cool. I must congratulate all riders and their crew for their diligence in ensuring their horses remained cool and comfortable throughout the weekend, the organisers for ensuring that sufficient water and ice was provided, and the veterinary commission for their care in ensuring that the horses were fit to continue at all times.”

further information from Dr David Marlin on caring for your horse in the heat visit - http://davidmarlin.co.uk/portfolio/advice-for-horse-owners-in-hot-weather/.

Thursday, July 26, 2018

Endurance Saddles of the future being developed in the Foothills

TryonDailyBulletin.com - Full Article

By Catherine Hunter
Published 8:00 am Wednesday, July 25, 2018

New riding technology being researched in Tryon

TRYON — Ron Friedson, of Pegasus Saddles, was in town this week talking about Pegasus’ new Featherweight saddle designed for endurance riders.

Friedson has been working with Mike Schatzberg, owner of Cherokee Hill Farm in Tryon, to develop the ideal lightweight saddle for endurance riders.

“The Pegasus Saddles are made with a Unicorn Duel Action spring hinge embedded on either side in the front of the saddletree,” Friedson said. “This lets the saddle automatically open and close to fit wide or narrow backed horses, or even a horse that is uneven.”

Pegasus saddles are designed and built by a former Kieffer saddle maker. Friedson himself is a world-renowned saddle designer, and has studied with both German and English saddle makers...

Read more here:
https://www.tryondailybulletin.com/2018/07/25/saddles-of-the-future-being-developed-in-the-foothills/

Wednesday, July 25, 2018

Out-of-control dogs v. horse riders: FEI to fine owners

Horsetalk.co.nz - Full Article

July 17, 2018
Horsetalk.co.nz

Loose dogs have been in the news in recent weeks following the serious injuries sustained by a horse rider on an equestrian trail in New Zealand. Now, horse sport’s governing body is looking to clamp down on loose dogs at events, with fines for the offending owners.

In the latest proposals for modifications to its General Regulations, the FEI said there was currently no provision in its rules about dogs at FEI Events. “It is proposed to clarify that dogs must be leashed at FEI events as otherwise it can be dangerous for the horses/riders if there are loose dogs running.”

If allowed at an event, dogs must be leashed and “affixed to a human or stationary object”, under the new, proposed wording. Violation of the rule will incur a fine of the equivalent of $US100 for each offence. Repeat offenders may be excluded from the venue...

Read more here:
https://www.horsetalk.co.nz/2018/07/17/dogs-horse-riders-fei-fine-owners/

Sunday, July 22, 2018

Feeding Endurance Horses

Thehorse.com - Full Article

Feeding hard-working endurance horses is as much art as it is science. Our sources walk you through an endurance horse’s diet, from conditioning to post-race. Read an excerpt from this feature in our July 2018 issue.

By Heather Smith Thomas | Jul 16, 2018

Make sure your horse gets the energy, nutrients, and water he needs to tackle a long ride


Athletes need fuel to work. Endurance horses, in particular, need a nutrition strategy that will allow them to travel all day at moderate to high speeds without “running out of gas” or becoming dehydrated. They need adequate energy in a form that won’t produce excess body heat and will provide enough fluid and electrolytes to maintain hydration.

Julie Bullock, DVM, of Mount Sidney, Virginia, has been riding endurance horses for 25 years and competes in 100-mile races. She says the endurance community is growing fast, and it’s important for newcomers to the sport to understand these horses’ nutritional needs.

Kathleen Crandell, PhD, an equine nutritionist with Kentucky Equine Research, in Versailles, has extensive background in nutrition science and has trained and competed endurance horses. “When feeding an endurance horse, we think about two programs—feeding the horse on a daily basis as we get the horse into fitness, and then a plan for what we’ll feed the horse on the day of competition,” she says.

In this article our sources will walk you through an endurance horse’s diet, from conditioning to post-race...

Read more here:
https://thehorse.com/159337/feeding-endurance-horses/

Wednesday, July 11, 2018

Acclimating our endurance horses for heat and humidity

KarenChaton.com - Full Article

by Karen Chaton

It has suddenly gotten hotter. It should get up to 90 degrees here today and will get even warmer than that in the next few days. I know in previous years when I have ridden my horses more in the heat, they acclimate to it rather well and have done well on rides that were very hot or else hot and humid.

When my horses have gone to rides that were suddenly hot or abnormally hot and humid compared to the kind of conditions we had been riding in – it was a lot harder on them.

This got me curious about how long it takes to acclimate a horse to riding in heat and humidity. I was able to find quite a bit of information including a few studies where they were able to acclimate horses in 21 days, with results showing up in 14 days. Perfect timing for those planning on going to the Tevis – NOW is the time to really get our horses acclimated to the heat. Later this week we are also due to have afternoon thunderstorms which means it will be hot AND humid. As a side benefit, while I am getting my horses better prepared to handle working in hotter and more humid conditions I will also be acclimating myself.

I know riders who have worked their horses with sheets on in order to help the horse learn to deal with the additional heat load. That makes sense. It’s a lot like working them in the spring with their winter coat and then doing a full body clip just before a ride. With careful monitoring of your horses vital signs you can do this safely – just make sure your horse doesn’t over heat or become dehydrated, and that you allow enough time for the horse to recover after each work out...

Read more here:
http://www.karenchaton.com/2010/07/acclimating-endurance-horses-heat-humidity/

Wednesday, July 04, 2018

FEI: Permitted Equine Therapists (PETs)

FEI.org

Permitted Equine Therapist (PET) is a new category of personnel introduced in 2018. PETs are permitted to carry out ‘Restricted Therapies’ in which they have been trained, according to the Veterinary Regulations 2018, Chapter VI.

Registration of Permitted Equine Therapists

As of 1 July 2018 anyone who carries out Restricted Therapies at FEI events must be a PET. PETs are required to fill in the Registration Form (found below) and give it to the Veterinary Delegate on arrival at the event. Stewards have started to carry out PET identification checks at events. Should any person, who is not a PET or Permitted Treating Veterinarian, carry out Restricted Therapies at FEI event they will be sanctioned in accordance with the Veterinary Regulations, Annex VI.

Applying to become a Permitted Equine Therapist
In order to apply to become a PET, we strongly suggest applicants read the 'Guidelines for Applicants' found below. Applications are received and reviewed by the applicant's National Federation. Once their approval has been sought, the applicant must pass an online examination in order to obtain the PET status.

For guidelines and registration form see:
https://inside.fei.org/fei/your-role/veterinarians/permitted-equine-therapists

Tuesday, July 03, 2018

Horses Have Had Dental Appointments in Mongolia for Over 3,000 Years

LiveScience.com - Full Article

By Laura Geggel, Senior Writer | July 2, 2018

Imagine extracting a wayward tooth from a young horse more than two millennia before the discovery of laughing gas. It may sound like a Herculean task, but the ancient people of Mongolia figured it out, making them the oldest veterinary dentists on record.

Researchers made the discovery by examining 85 ancient horse remains, dating from about 1200 B.C. to 700 B.C., that had been buried in equine graves by the nomadic Deer Stone-Khirigsuur culture in Mongolia. The researchers found that one of these teeth was sticking out at an odd angle and had been cut, possibly with a stone, in about 1150 B.C., making it the oldest known evidence of horse dentistry in the world...

Read more here:
https://www.livescience.com/62974-oldest-horse-dentistry-on-record.html

Monday, July 02, 2018

Trailering the Trail Horse

Trailmeister.com - Full Article

June 5 2018
by Robert Eversole

Trailering the Trail Horse

As Published in the May 2018 issue of The Horsemen’s Corral

Spring and summer are upon us and with them trail riding. Unless you’re one of the fortunate few that has immediate access to trails you most likely have to load your mounts and haul to the trails. With that in mind let’s take a moment to consider what goes into hauling our horses and mules.

The effort involved with towing starts long before we arrive at the trail head or even hook up the trailer. Consider the training aspect of trailering a horse. Just as we might not enjoy riding down the road in a noisy, bumpy, and drafty trailer, most horses tend to be a bit leery of this dark box, fortunately given enough time and patience most equines learn to tolerate the process.

Most of us have had experience with a horse that refuses to load or races out of the trailer. Practice obedience and calmness by asking him to walk forward, stand quietly, and back up on your command. The objective is for your horse to walk quietly into the trailer, stand there for a bit, and then calmly back out on your command. How long it takes to get here depends on you and your horse. Teaching your horse to load takes patience, trust and much groundwork before he’ll be a consistent loader. But once that happens he’ll step into any trailer when asked and unload easily and relaxed when you arrive at the trailhead. Quiet and confident trailering equates into a pleasure ride for both of you...

Read more here:
https://www.trailmeister.com/trailering-the-trail-horse-2/

How long does strangles survive in the environment?

EquineScienceUpdate Blog - Full Article

June 23 2018

Veterinarians and horse handlers should be aware that Streptococcus equi, the organism responsible for strangles, may survive in the environment for longer than previously thought, according to new research.

The study, by Andy Durham and colleagues, has been reported in the Equine Veterinary Journal.

The researchers inoculated S. equi cultures onto seven surfaces found in veterinary practices or in stables, and took serial samples to see how long the organism remained viable.

The test surfaces included a wet plastic bucket, a dental rasp, inside a naso-gastric tube and a fence post...

Read more here:
https://equinescienceupdate.blogspot.com/2018/06/how-long-does-strangles-survive-in.html

Sunday, July 01, 2018

Bill Introduced in Senate in Response to ELD Mandate

Thehorse.com - Full Article

Senator Ben Sasse introduced the legislation in an effort to insulate the livestock industry from the electronic logging device (ELD) changes facing the commercial trucking industry.

By American Horse Council | May 30, 2018

On May 23, Senator Ben Sasse (R-MT) introduced the ‘‘Transporting Livestock Across America Safely Act,” in an effort to insulate the livestock industry from the electronic logging device (ELD) mandate facing the commercial trucking industry.

In it the Secretary of Transportation would amend the federal regulations to ensure that a driver transporting livestock or insects within a 300 air-mile radius from the point at which the driver begins the trip shall exclude all time spent;

At a plant, terminal, facility, or other property of a motor carrier or shipper or on any public property during which the driver is waiting to be dispatched;
Loading or unloading a commercial motor vehicle;
Supervising or assisting in the loading or unloading of a commercial motor vehicle;
Attending to a commercial motor vehicle while the vehicle is being loaded or unloaded;
Remaining in readiness to operate a commercial motor vehicle; and
Giving or receiving receipts for shipments loaded or unloaded;...

Read more here:
https://thehorse.com/158319/bill-introduced-in-senate-in-response-to-eld-mandate/

Could You Be Missing the Signs of Gastric Ulcers in Horses?

Thehorse.com - Full Article

Behavior and performance changes that could be associated with gastric ulcers in horses should prompt further veterinary investigation.

By Edited Press Release | May 29, 2018

Sometimes a training ride or a show doesn’t go well. You wonder, “Is my horse just having a bad day?” But before riders place blame on any variety of causes—from the weather and the environment to the horse’s athletic ability or even their own errors—they should consider another potential problem: equine stomach ulcers.

Less-than-optimal performance, resistance to work, and training difficulties are all common issues associated with gastric ulcers, which can develop in as few as five days. If you have noticed behaviors such as your horse pinning his ears while being groomed, or kicking out when the girth is tightened, equine stomach ulcers could be a possibility, and it might be time to contact your veterinarian.

“When horses are having behavioral issues or even decreased performance in the show ring, riders and trainers should consider stomach ulcers,” says Hoyt Cheramie, DVM, MS, Dipl. ACVS, senior equine professional service veterinarian for Boehringer Ingelheim. “An equine veterinarian will be able to diagnose ulcers via gastroscopy...”

Read more here:
https://thehorse.com/158302/could-you-be-missing-the-signs-of-gastric-ulcers-in-horses/

Monday, June 25, 2018

Cutaneous Lymphangitis in Horses

Thehorse.com - Full Article

If left untreated, cutaneous lymphangitis can cause permanent leg disfigurement. Here’s what to know about this condition.

By Equine Disease Quarterly | Apr 8, 2018

The lymphatic system is an important component of the cardiovascular system and consists of lymphatic vessels, lymph nodes, tonsils, spleen, and thymus. Lymph, a clear colorless fluid, is formed from fluid loss that occurs during normal nutrient exchange in capillary beds. The lymphatic vessels transport lymph to regional lymph nodes for filtration to aid in immunologic detection of microorganisms, toxins, and foreign material. Once filtered, the vessels once again transport the lymph to large veins, which ultimately return it back into the circulatory system to replenish the fluid lost from the capillaries.

Lymphatic disease can occur when lymph vessels become inflamed, leaky, and/or blocked. Cutaneous lymphangitis—inflammation of the skin’s lymphatic vessels—is fairly uncommon in horses, does not exhibit age, sex, or breed predilections. It can develop from both infectious and non-infectious causes...

Read more here:
https://thehorse.com/156982/cutaneous-lymphangitis-in-horses/

Sunday, June 24, 2018

Endurance | The ultimate challenge

SportBusiness.com - Full Article

By: SportBusiness International team

30 April 2018

This article was produced in association with the FEI

Get ready for some seriously long hours in the saddle. Endurance riding is an equestrian discipline where riders race long-distance on horseback along country trails, testing both their physical and mental skills. In events run by the international governing body for equestrian sport (the Fédération Equestre international, or FEI), those distances range from 80km (50 miles) to 160km (100 miles), all in a single day.

Manuel Bandeira de Mello is Endurance Director at the FEI. “Endurance riding tests the speed and endurance of a horse and challenges the rider over their effective use of pace, thorough knowledge of their horse’s capabilities and the ability to cross all kinds of terrain,” he explains. “Although the rides are timed, the emphasis is on finishing in good condition rather than coming in first.”

He stresses how each rider must safely manage the stamina and fitness of their horse. For this reason, all courses are divided into phases, with compulsory halts for veterinary inspections (known as vet gates) after each phase. “Each horse must be presented for inspection within a set time of reaching each vet gate, which determines whether it is fit to continue,” Bandeira de Mello adds.

Many different breeds of horse have successfully competed in endurance riding. However, by far the most successful are Arabians and Arabian crosses.

The courses often take in some breathtakingly beautiful landscapes. The 2014 FEI World Equestrian Games™, for example, saw competitors riding along Mont Saint-Michel Bay, in the French region of Normandy, with the English Channel and the island village of Mont Saint-Michel (a famous UNESCO World Heritage Site) providing the backdrop. The next edition of the FEI’s flagship event will take place this coming September in Tryon, North Carolina. The endurance course here is in the process of being put together and will undoubtedly take in some of the amazing countryside surrounding Tryon...

Read more here:
https://www.sportbusiness.com/sportbusiness-international/endurance-ultimate-challenge

Saturday, June 23, 2018

Equine Gastric and Colonic Ulcers

Horse-canada.com - Full Article

Written by: Nicole Kitchener & Dr. Bri Henderson

Recognizing and treating gastric and colonic ulcers.

Horses have a digestive system designed to manage a slow, steady intake of small amounts of forage. When this inherent grazing behaviour is disrupted by changes to diet, environment and other stressors – mainly by the actions of humans – horses often suffer digestive problems, one of the most common being ulcers. Ulcers are essentially intestinal sores that won’t heal. Two types affect the horse’s gastrointestinal system: gastric ulcers are lesions in the stomach wall, while colonic ulcers form in the hindgut, specifically, as the name suggests, in the colon. Horses can suffer from both simultaneously, but gastric ulcers occur more regularly.

EQUINE GASTRIC ULCERS

A horse’s stomach is small and comprised of two halves. The lower stomach, which is called the glandular mucosa, consists of a thick protective lining and glands that continuously produce large amounts of digestive acid (about 1.5 litres an hour) to help digest what is, by nature, supposed to be a perpetual intake of chewed forage. The upper stomach, the squamous mucosa, has a thinner lining and minimal protection from stomach acid. This is where most gastric ulcers form.

Although any horse, no matter their breed, age, sex or level of exercise, can have ulcers, performance animals are particularly prone. This is because stress of any type – due to transport, changes to routine, stall confinement, for example – is the main risk factor in ulcer development. Studies even show that stress from strenuous exercise itself not only increases the production of stomach acid but movement causes the acid to splash up into the vulnerable upper stomach.

Twice-a-day feeding schedules and limited grazing are also problematic. Because the lower stomach still produces acid even when the horse isn’t eating, prolonged periods without saliva, which is the upper stomach’s only buffer against acid, cause irritation and potentially ulcers...

Read more here:
https://horse-canada.com/magazine_articles/equine-gastric-colonic-ulcers/

Monday, June 18, 2018

Saddle Fitting the Arabian Horse

TheConnectedRider.com - Full Article

TheConnectedRider.com

I never had a desire to ride a bucking bronco. If I did I would have joined the Rodeo. Instead I prefer to ride my horses safely making sure if there was a bucking fest it came from training or exuberant expression (my nice way of saying they were being a naughty pony!) and not from pain. This first and foremost means my saddle must fit. If you have ever tried finding a saddle to fit an Arabian then you have stared adversity in the face and stated “I have got this!” Why?

Let’s clarify adversity: if you have ever called a saddle fitter and told them you were having trouble finding a saddle to fit and then the word “Arabian” came out of your mouth you could almost hear the crickets against the silence. In the saddle fitter world Arabians are known for being tough to saddle fit, not impossible but tough. Some saddle fitters relish in the challenge, others slowly back away never to be heard from again. It isn’t that Arabians are not particularly suited to being ridden, quite the contrary but the modern Arabian Sport Horse has become so athletic it has some unique fitting challenges to go with that athletic conformation and quite frankly many saddle manufactures just haven’t caught up. I thought I would pass on a little bit of knowledge I gained over the years trying to fit the impossible to fit Arabians.

For starters an Arabian horse in general has a straighter top line…please note I said in general, I currently have one Arabian that has anything but a level top line. The modern Arabian sport horse also in general has wide broad shoulders, a well sprung rib cage, a short back that is also well muscled with an equally well muscled and active loin. These horses are short coupled with well laid back shoulders and being fantastic elastic “back movers” it is amazing we don’t need super glue and duct tape to keep a saddle on them. Arabians in general do not have substantial withers. The good news is all these features make a spectacular riding horse.

The first thing I learned over the years of having Arabians is: there is no such thing as an Arabian saddle...

Read more here:
https://www.theconnectedrider.com/blogging/saddle-fitting-the-arabian/

Trail Riding Equine Etiquette

By Carey Williams and Janice Elsishans

When trail riding, everyone needs to be aware of not only safety concerns for the rider and the horse, but also courtesy for other trail users. All safety precautions and tips on riding should be practiced, because trail etiquette and safety go hand in hand.

Stay on designated or marked trails. Do not ride horses at a pace greater than a walk on muddy trails. You should cross rivers, creeks, or wetland only in designated areas to guard against adverse impact on the environment and for the safety of you and your horse.

Good riding etiquette prevents land abuse and destruction.. If you ride on federal or state lands, ask the park officials for their advice on the best trails to take or if there are any map changes. Ride only on lands offered for public or private use where you have permission to ride.

If you stop for lunch, make sure your horse is resting in a safe place both for the horse and for other trail users. Stay with your horse and be considerate of other trail users.

If it is permissible to have the horses rest off the trail, do not tie your horse directly to a tree. Use two lightweight 8-foot lines with panic snaps and secure your horse between two trees. This will prevent the horse from chewing the bark and damaging the root system.

Leave what you find and carry out what you packed.

Water should be offered to a horse at any available point on the trail if the trail permits horse access. If there is no access, do not attempt to enter the water. Entering rivers or streams in undesignated areas can cause damage to the environment, be unsafe for the horse, and possibly result in the trail being closed to horses.

At the trailhead or when using a public park, be considerate of other users and clean up any manure. Do not toss manure from your trailer into the bushes unless you have asked the proper officials if this is acceptable.

Horses that are young or new to trails can learn from seasoned trail horses, so surround the novice horse with two or three seasoned horses. This is especially helpful if a novice trail horse is easily spooked.

Horses may not understand that a hiker with a large backpack, floppy hat, or a fishing rod is still a person. Speak to others on the trail to help your horse understand that unfamiliar objects do not pose a danger.

Keep your own safety in mind, as well. It is best not to ride alone, but if you do, tell someone where you are going and what time you expect to be back. Consider carrying a whistle or cell phone to use in case of an emergency. It takes less effort to blow a whistle than to yell for help.
 
Consider attaching an identification tag to your horse when trail riding. The tag should include the horse’s name, your name, and your cell phone number. Should you become separated from your horse and you are some distance from home, a cell phone number will aid anyone who has caught your horse in reuniting it with you.

Carry a current map of the area and have an idea where you are going. Study the area around you, noting landmarks. Occasionally look behind you to help recognize the trail for your return.

Friday, June 15, 2018

Riders are more stable in saddles without flaps, study finds

Horseandhound.co.uk - Full Article

Sarah Radford
15:37 - 14 June, 2018

Riders have greater stability in saddles without flaps, a new study has claimed.

US researchers collected data from five dressage horses ridden in their own conventional saddles and a flapless saddle provided by EQ Saddle Science.

The conventional, treed saddles featured two flaps — a sweat flap next to the horse’s ribcage where the girth straps lay and a second flap over which the stirrup leathers hang.

The flapless saddle goes one further than a monoflap design, separating the rider’s legs from the horse with a saddlepad only.

The horses used in the study were three European warmbloods, one thoroughbred-warmblood cross, and one Lusitano, all of which were ridden by their regular professional riders to reduce variability in the data.

Each horse was ridden in the flapless saddle twice in the three days prior to the study to allow them to get used to the feel...

Read more at http://www.horseandhound.co.uk/news/riders-stable-saddles-without-flaps-study-finds-656370#tHVrK0c1ISr4IWbj.99

Tuesday, June 12, 2018

All the Wild Horses review – hills, hooves and unhinged competitors

TheGuardian.com - Full Article

Ivo Marloh’s documentary about the Mongol Derby captures the beauty and bedlam of the 1,000-km cross-country race

by Peter Bradshaw
@PeterBradshaw1
Fri 8 Jun 2018

To non-horse-riders the subject of this looks like the most extraordinary exercise in masochism and self-harm, and yet there is a kind of fascination in it. The film is about the Mongol Derby, a brutally punishing 1,000-kilometre endurance race across Mongolia, recreating Genghis Khan’s 13th-century horse-messenger trail.

Riders have to use the wild horses they’re given and ride all day for about 10 days, changing mounts every 40 kilometres. They are intensively tracked and monitored with GPS, with hyper-alert support teams of doctors and vets, although psychotherapists would probably also be a good idea. The contestants face tough terrain, the possibility of encountering wolves and probable/inevitable injury – or, as someone cheerfully puts it: “faceplanting”, which could lead to broken necks. It looks as terrifyingly dangerous as the TT races in the Isle of Man...

Read more here:
https://www.theguardian.com/film/2018/jun/08/all-the-wild-horses-review

Saturday, June 02, 2018

Long Riders' Guild Press publishes 3-volume Encyclopaedia of Equestrian Exploration

May 25 2018

After years of uninterrupted labour the Long Riders’ Guild has helped usher in a new age of equestrian exploration. With Members in 46 countries, the Guild has mentored equestrian expeditions on every continent except Antarctica.
 
Subsequently, to mark the 400 year anniversary of the birth of equestrian travel literature, the Long Riders’ Guild Press is writing to announce the publication of the three-volume Encyclopaedia of Equestrian Exploration, the most extensive study of equestrian travel ever created.
 
Robin Hanbury-Tenison is a Founding Member of the Guild and a Fellow of the Royal Geographical Society who was awarded the Patron’s Gold medal. In the Preface, Robin declared, “CuChullaine O'Reilly is a phenomenon. In these magnificent volumes all the great equestrian experiences throughout history are recorded and, above all, the love that can exist between humans and horses is revealed.”
 
Noted equestrian author and Founding Member of the Guild Jeremy James stated in the Foreword, “If the Encyclopaedia of Equestrian Exploration isn’t a Magnum Opus, then nothing counts. I believe CuChullaine O’Reilly has written the most astounding book in equestrian historical literature. CuChullaine, you’ve joined the Immortals.”
 
The first and second sets of the Encyclopaedia were presented to Great Britain’s reigning monarch, Her Majesty, Queen Elizabeth II, and to the future king, His Royal Highness, Prince Charles, both of whom exerted a profound influence on the creation of the books.
 
The famous British explorer, John Hare, reviewed the Encyclopaedia for England’s most prestigious magazine, Country Life. He described “the masterly volumes as a comprehensive work that will be treasured by future long riders and seen as a unique treasury of horse and human wisdom.”
 
The Encyclopaedia is not the limited personal view of the author. It is not the recollections of a single traveller. It does not promote the superiority of one race or culture. It contains the collective wisdom of more than 400 Long Riders. The pages document their neglected role in equestrian history and reveals their gallant struggles against inconceivable odds
 
For the first time in history the books written by Long Rider authors are honoured in an extensive Bibliography which includes more than 200 titles dating back hundreds of years. The 1,800 pages are enriched by nearly a thousand images, drawings and photographs.
 
Volume 1 consists of The Preparation, The Horses and The Equipment, Volume 2 consists of The Challenges and Volume 3 consists of The Journey, The Aftermath and The Epilogue. Thus the Encyclopaedia’s three volumes contain hundreds of pages of practical wisdom gained from the travels of the greatest equestrian explorers.
 
It is also a guidebook that explains that state of mental tranquillity described as The Long Quiet. A few books have addressed the practical aspects of horse travel. But no one has examined the philosophical side. The Encyclopaedia of Equestrian Exploration doesn’t just tell you how. It reveals why. HRH Prince Charles provided the spiritual inspiration for the Encyclopaedia.  His profound influence can be seen throughout the book, and he is specifically quoted and thanked in the Epilogue, which addresses issues that confront us all as human beings.
 
To augment the study of equestrian exploration, the Long Riders’ Guild previously released The Horse Travel Handbook. This smaller cavalry style manual has already accompanied a number of Long Riders during their journeys in the Americas, Asia and Australia.
 
Taken together, the Encyclopaedia and the Handbook represent an equestrian Rosetta Stone that chronicles the ancestral story of the Long Riders and ensures that humanity’s collective equestrian travel heritage is preserved for posterity.
 
Kind regards,
CuChullaine O’Reilly FRGS
Founder, The Long Riders’ Guild
 
Advance Reviews
 
“CuChullaine O’Reilly is unquestionably the most gifted equestrian writer of the 21st century. Except for his abbreviated version – The Horse Travel Handbook, there has never been a guide written that is in any way comparable to this unusual tour de force.
Canadian Long Rider Bonnie Folkins
 
“The Encyclopaedia of Equestrian Exploration was authored by CuChullaine O’Reilly, the foremost expert, scholar and gentleman of horse back travel and exploration. It represents a vast collection of wisdom brought together for the first time.”
New Zealand Long Rider Ian Robinson
 
“CuChullaine O’Reilly is the lore-master of the Long Riders’ tribe. After decades of amazing research, his wonderfully written Encyclopaedia of Equestrian Exploration represents a literary landmark in the study of horse travel.”
Russian Long Rider Vladimir Fissenko
 
“The Encyclopaedia of Equestrian Exploration is not about one nation. It represents the collective wisdom of humanity’s travel on horseback. This is a book of marvels that includes precious stories, valuable ideas, forgotten history and endangered practical knowledge.”
Lithuanian Long Rider Gintaras Kaltenis
 
“No one has written about equestrian travel as CuChullaine O’Reilly has. The author misses nothing. His breadth of knowledge is astonishing. I was amazed at the skill of the writing. This book is not only vital to equestrian travelers, it is essential to our human history.”
American Long Rider Lucy Leaf
 
“The Encyclopaedia of Equestrian Exploration is the Bible for Long Riders. These books will guide you, inspire you, and show you right from wrong.”
Argentine Long Rider Benjamin Reynal

Thursday, May 31, 2018

Am I doing enough training for a 50-miler?

KER.com

Question
I endurance-ride a seasoned, 13-year-old Arabian gelding. Because of work commitments, I only train him on weekends, about 12.5 miles (20 km) a day. With this minimal training, he has done beautifully in 25-mile (40-km) rides. Although he has completed a 50-mile (80-km) ride in the past with his previous owner, I have not. Am I doing enough training for a 50-miler? I don’t want to overdo or sour him.

Answer
Arabians hold their fitness amazingly well, particularly if they have 24-hour turnout. Working two days per week is usually adequate training for an endurance horse, as this schedule allows for plenty of time for the body to repair itself between the workouts, thus promoting soundness.

If the horse has done 50-mile races before and you are keeping him is steady work, he should have no problem with stepping up from a 25-mile to 50-mile rides, even if you are only doing shorter training sessions...

Read the rest here:
https://ker.com/equinews/answer/qa-fitness-endurance-competition/?platform=hootsuite

Monday, May 21, 2018

Nutrition and Recovery for Eventing (and Other Hard-Working) Horses

Thehorse.com - Full Article

Restoring muscle glycogen, rehydrating, and ensuring a horse’s diet offers enough vitamin E all help with recovery after strenuous exercise.

By Clair Thunes, PhD | Apr 30, 2018

Q. I am an avid event rider and enjoyed watching the Land Rover Kentucky Three-Day Event this past weekend. What kinds of nutritional support can you give horses competing in this level of competition to help them recover?

A. This is a great question. Any post-competition recovery effort starts with the base diet, which meet the horse’s daily requirements leading up to the competition. No long-term deficiency is going to get fixed in the short period during competition, so a balanced diet appropriate for the horse’s discipline and work level is crucial.

Part of that is ensuring the horse is getting the right kind of fuel to support the type of work that he’s asked to do. Event horses won’t only be utilizing stored carbohydrate on cross-country day but hopefully their reserves of fat stores, as well. Cross-country efforts will deplete glycogen stores (stored carbohydrates) in the horse’s muscles. The horse will need glycogen again for the show jumping phase, so restoring those stores is an important component of recovery...

Read more here:
https://thehorse.com/157545/nutrition-and-recovery-for-eventing-and-other-hard-working-horses/

Sunday, May 20, 2018

Check Horses’ Alfalfa Hay for Blister Beetles

Thehorse.com - Full Article

Blister beetles in your horse’s alfalfa can be deadly. Here’s what to watch for and how to keep your horses healthy.

By Kristen M. Janicki, MS, PAS | Apr 9, 2018

It might be hard to imagine that an essential part of the horse’s diet could contain potentially deadly hidden toxins. But it’s a hard truth that horse owners must be aware of: Alfalfa hay can harbor blister beetles (Epicauta spp), which can contain a harmful toxic substance called cantharidin.

A member of the Meloidae family, blister beetles live throughout the United States and Canada. Their average body length is about 0.3 to 1.3 inches. A blister beetle’s diet is mainly composed of pollen, blossoms, and leaves of flowering plants, making alfalfa the perfect meal for them. Most alfalfa infestation occurs during late summer and early fall, when the adult blister beetle population also peaks.

Male blister beetles produce a natural defense toxin called cantharidin. This irritant can cause blisters on skin (of both horses and humans) within a few hours of contact, hence the insect’s name. When ingested, cantharidin is lethal in horses with as little as half a milligram per kilogram of body weight, equivalent to consumption of around 125 beetles for an average-sized horse...

Read more here:
https://thehorse.com/112252/check-horses-alfalfa-hay-for-blister-beetles/

Thursday, May 17, 2018

Do You Know Where Your Old Horses Are?

Chronofhorse.com - Full Article

By: Blogger Liz Arbittier
May 16, 2018 - 12:36 PM

“FOR SALE: 18-year-old papered Missouri Fox Trotter. Fancy broke! Anyone can ride, neck reins, quiet on trails.”

The Facebook ad caught my attention. I was casually looking for a babysitter horse for light trail riding. I love geriatric animals, and something about this horse grabbed me. A cheaply priced, hairy, flea-bitten gray, he stoically gaited and cantered barefoot up and down an asphalt road in his video.

Not sure why, but he lodged in my brain, and I decided to purchase him. Sight unseen. (BAD IDEA!) Off the internet from a dealer I’d never met. (VERY BAD IDEA!!) With no pre-purchase exam. (VERY VERY BAD IDEA!!!)

My feeling was that, as a vet (who ironically specializes in pre-purchase exams), I could deal with whatever he turned out to be. He was sound in the video, and I wanted to trust the seller. He assured me that the horse hadn’t come from a sale, wasn’t sick and would suit my needs. I paid for the horse and then had him shipped to me, which cost half again as much as the horse did!

He arrived after quite a long trailer ride. Forlorn and cranky, with NO interest in interacting with me, he was otherwise in good shape...

Read more here:
http://www.chronofhorse.com/article/do-you-know-where-your-old-horses-are

Monday, May 14, 2018

Training Tip: Ask Clinton: Avoiding Training

Downunderhorsemanship.com - Full Article

Q: I recently started working with my horse in the roundpen and have made decent progress. He gives me two eyes and follows me around the roundpen. But now when I first show up, if he even suspects a workout, he runs to the far end of his 2-acre turnout and won’t let me get any closer than 50 feet or so to him. What should be my strategy for catching him? – Traci R.

A: It sounds like you’re off to a great start with your horse, mate. You’re on the right track by working with him in the roundpen to establish the foundation of respect. If your horse will give you two eyes and “catch you” in the roundpen, it’ll be much easier to have the same thing happen in the pasture. I don’t think your horse’s problem is that he’s hard to catch necessarily. Let me explain...

Read more here:
https://downunderhorsemanship.com/2018/05/08/training-tip-ask-clinton-avoiding-training/

Tuesday, May 08, 2018

Appaloosa Horse Club to Celebrate History at the 54th Annual Chief Joseph Trail Ride

May 7 2018

MOSCOW, IDAHO — The Appaloosa Horse Club (ApHC) will host the 54th Annual Chief Joseph Trail Ride, July 23 – 27, 2018. A portion of the 1,100 mile, historic trail is ridden each year, with the entire sequence taking thirteen years to complete. Its route traces, as closely as possible, the route Chief Joseph and the Nez Perce took while attempting to escape the US Cavalry in 1877. This year’s segment is the only “loop ride” during the thirteen years. The assembly and destination camps are both in the Tolo Lake area near Grangeville, Idaho. The exact route is subject to change, but this year’s participants will ride through White Bird Battle Ground, where the first battle took place, across Joseph Plains and along or over Hammer Creek, Rice Creek, Wolf Creek, Graves Creek, and the Salmon River.

Each year, participants make lasting memories and lifetime friends among fellow riders while enjoying their Appaloosa horses. The ApHC hosted the first Chief Joseph Trail Ride in 1965 to commemorate the historic journey taken by a band of Nez Perce, led by Chief Joseph and others. The ride is exclusively for registered Appaloosas and is the longest-running and most popular trail ride hosted by the ApHC.

For additional information on this year’s Chief Joseph Trail Ride and the official ride entry form, visit https://www.appaloosa.com/trail/ChiefJoseph.htm or contact the ApHC Trail & Distance Coordinator Pat Bogar at (208) 882-5578 ext. 264.

Monday, May 07, 2018

Changing with the seasons

EquusMagazine.com - Full Story

May 6 2018
BOBBIE LIEBERMAN

Even as our ranch in New Mexico starts to take shape, Kenny and I realize how much we’ll miss Texas. So we explore whether a summer-winter migration might work for us.

Kenny and I enjoyed four lovely months on our new property in New Mexico over the summer. We had as many as four horses with us along with our cattle dog Maddie. Most of our time was spent planning, building and constructing infrastructure on our new ranch---outbuildings, manufactured home, solar well, fencing ---and that didn’t leave much time for actual riding.

We would have stayed through the end of October, but the horses back in Texas needed hoof trimming, one had a mysterious lameness that necessitated intensive treatment and two nights in a veterinary clinic, and our Siamese cats were about to give up on us. (Fortunately, we have a ranch caretaker who looks after all of our critters when we’re away.)

When we returned to Texas at the end of September, autumn had not yet arrived and we found ourselves back in the heat and humidity we’d left behind and nearly forgotten. Annakate, our Morgan who had been thriving in her new environment at 7,400 feet, soon developed scratches, hives and an itchy tail once again. Our mountain ponies already had grown thick winter coats, but the additional fur wasn’t needed here, so trace clipping ensued.

However, despite all of that, it was good to be “home.” It felt comfortable and familiar. Once again, veterinary and medical services were close by, and organic fresh produce was with- in an hour’s drive. Being back in Texas was like slipping into a com- fortable pair of shoes. We had to ad- mit that we still loved our ranch here. And we began contemplating the idea of keeping it, at least for a few more years, and “migrating” to New Mexico for the summers...

Read more here:
https://equusmagazine.com/horse-world/changing-seasons


All About Feeding Horses Alfalfa

Thehorse.com - Full Article

Learn more about alfalfa and whether or not this leafy green legume is a good choice for your horse.

By Heather Smith Thomas | Apr 9, 2018

How much do you really know about this leafy green legume?

In some areas of the country, alfalfa is a regular part of life. It’s readily available and commonly fed, so it’s a logical foundation for many horses’ diets. In other areas, it is a delicacy of sorts, shipped in from different regions and bought a bale at a time on a vet’s recommendation to help certain horses that need nutritional support. For some types of horses—in either of those areas—-alfalfa simply isn’t a great choice. And, so, that fragrant green bale comes loaded with nutrients and, for some horse owners, a multitude of misconceptions.

Whatever your alfalfa experience, we’re here to tell you everything you need to know about this forage, starting with a little bit of history, and clear up any confusion about it.
Alfalfa Goes Way Back

Forage for horses can be divided into two categories—grasses and legumes. Grasses you’re likely familiar with include orchardgrass, timothy, and bermudagrass and are long and stemmy. Forage legumes, such as clover and alfalfa, are members of the pea family and, so, are cousins of peanuts and garbanzo beans.

“Alfalfa is a perennial legume, grown in most regions of the U.S. for horses and other livestock,” says Krishona Martinson, PhD, associate professor and equine extension specialist in the University of Minnesota’s Department of Animal Science, in Falcon Heights...

Read more here:
https://thehorse.com/110110/all-about-alfalfa/

Saturday, May 05, 2018

Life Flight Network


Trailmeister.com - Full Article

As published in The Trailhead News
by Trailmeister Robert Eversole

April 30 2018

We’ve all heard the stories. “A horseback rider found himself in trouble after falling from a horse and had to be airlifted to safety.” A few of us have been the subject of the story and most of us have no idea how any of it works. Myself included. To remedy that I recently took advantage of an opportunity to talk with the folks at Life Flight Network, the air ambulance service that covers the Pacific Northwest and Intermountain West. To say my awareness has been elevated is an understatement.

I met Dominic Pomponio, Regional Director of the Life Flight Network at their base in Spokane, WA where he educated me on what it is that Life Flight Network does and how they do it.

Founded in 1978 (Happy 40thby the way!) the Life Flight Network is a medical transport service that brings the Intensive Care Unit to you when you need it. They deliver highly trained Flight Nurses, Flight Paramedics, pilots, and aircraft to provide air ambulance transportation to seriously ill and injured patients. With 23 bases across Washington, Oregon, Idaho, and Montana housing 23 helicopters and 7 airplanes, Life Flight Network has the assets required to get you where you need to be in an emergency...

Read more here:
https://www.trailmeister.com/life-flight-network/

Thursday, May 03, 2018

Training Tip: Mount With Safety in Mind

DownUnderHorsemanship.com - Full Article

May 1, 2018 by Downunder Horsemanship

When you’re ready to mount your horse for the first few times outside the arena, play it safe by flexing his head halfway around to his side. This is a safety precaution so that if the horse takes off or bucks, you’ve already got his head bent around so the worst thing he can do is move in a tight circle. With the same hand you’re flexing with, grab some mane to give yourself something solid to hang onto as you step up in the saddle. Always step up (and step down) from the horse’s shoulder, especially with a reactive horse, in case he gets frightened and tries to kick you. Even if your horse is docile, this is just a good practice to follow for your safety.

You could let your horse look straight ahead and keep him on a big, loose rein as you got in the saddle. Imagine what would happen if...

Read more here:
https://downunderhorsemanship.com/2018/05/01/training-tip-mount-with-safety-in-mind/

Tuesday, May 01, 2018

The Challenges of Spring Grass: Laminitis and Founder

Easycare Blog - Full Article

Friday, April 27, 2018 by Guest HCP
Submitted by EasyCare Dealer, Dawn Willoughby
Original Post June 2, 2011

In most cases, owners can prevent the ravages of laminitis (inflammation of the laminae between hoof wall and coffin bone) and founder (pulling away of wall from coffin bone due to a broken laminae). During my six years as a professional trimmer, I tried to educate owners about preventing this painful situation. Here is a review of what I shared with them every spring.

I live in Delaware where we have a spring that challenges most horses. Beginning in late March, early April, our sugary spring grass starts to grow. Our worst days are cool and sunny. This combination has the effect of creating a surge of sugar in the grass. When the sun goes down, the spring night temperatures are cool, keeping the sugar in the grass, not allowing it to return to the roots. That's a double whammy for the natural herd that is out 24/7. It isn't until July that we reliably dry out and warm up every day and night. When this happens the sugar returns to the roots. I learned about forage growth and pasture management from studying materials and attending clinics by Katy Watts, www.safergrass.org, an agricultural expert and owner of founder-prone horses. She offers wonderful lectures on her site as well.

When I had a trimming practice, I encouraged owners to mark April 1st to July 1st on their calendars and prepare for spring grass for their easy keepers.

1. First and foremost, adjust the diet. Lower dietary sugar anyway you can. You will need to be especially aggressive if you have a horse prone to laminitis and founder, usually known as an “easy keeper”. Examples: draft horses, native horses and ponies and donkeys. Eliminate grain, molasses, most treats and, if necessary, add a muzzle or put the horse in a dirt pasture or on a dirt path system such as Paddock Paradise. Hay should have 10% or less sugar. Correctly soaking hay can reduce sugar by 30%; leave the sugar water on the bottom of the tub. Most horses do very well on forage diets...

Read more here:
http://blog.easycareinc.com/blog/insights-from-the-inside/the-challenges-of-spring-grass%3A-laminitis-and-founder

Monday, April 30, 2018

Horses remember if you smiled or frowned when they last saw you

NewScientist.com - Full Article

DAILY NEWS 26 April 2018

By Sam Wong

Why the long face? Horses can remember the facial expressions they see on human faces and respond differently if you smiled or frowned when they last saw you.

Leanne Proops, now at the University of Portsmouth, UK, and her colleagues at the University of Sussex showed in 2016 that horses respond differently to photographs of happy or angry human faces. Now they have studied whether horses can form lasting memories of people that depend on their facial expressions.

First, they showed horses a photo of one of two human models, displaying either a happy or angry face. Several hours later, the model visited the horse in person, this time with a neutral expression. As a control, some horses saw a different model in the second part to the one they saw in the photograph.

Crucially, the models didn’t know which photo the horse had seen earlier. In the early 20th century, a horse called Clever Hans amazed audiences by appearing to answer simple mathematical problems by tapping his hoof. It turned out he was responding to involuntary cues from his trainer. Proops’ study aimed to eliminate such cues...

Read more here:
https://www.newscientist.com/article/2167423-horses-remember-if-you-smiled-or-frowned-when-they-last-saw-you/

Sunday, April 29, 2018

Top Ten Questions Endurance Green Beans Ask

EnduranceIntrospection.com - Full Article

by Patti Stedman | Sep 3, 2017 | Patti's Blog

I believe that I shall always miss David Letterman’s Top Ten lists.

After teaching so many clinics, meeting new riders or prospective riders or riders who have an inkling that they might love our sport “if only … ” — I can almost finish the questions before they are asked.

(And for the record, “green bean” is a term that the Pacific Northwest riders came up with to identify folks new to the sport … this post is not about vegetables.)

Here’s the Top Ten list — and some answers!

10.) This Sport is OVERWHELMING! Where Do I Begin?

This sport does indeed have a steep learning curve. No question. And the trickiest part of that is the first year of competing is probably your most important, so for your horse’s sake, you should probably do some homework before you leap in. (Now, let’s be clear, there are lots of experienced riders on mature horses who just show up at their first competition as a blank slate and do just fine, but the riders I meet contemplating giving the sport a whirl are rarely so confident.)

The good news is that there are tons of resources these days to help you. The bad news is that there are tons of resources these days to help you, and that can be overwhelming...

Read more here:
http://enduranceintrospection.com/wp/top-ten-questions-endurance-green-beans-ask/

Tuesday, April 24, 2018

In which I post the list of the books about riding long distances

HaikuFarm Blog - Full Article

April 23, 2018
by Aarene Storms

Recently, I compiled a list of books--there are so many new titles!--for Endurance News magazine, the publication of the American Endurance Rides Conference. It's in the April 2018 issue, if you want to hunt for it. If you don't, you've come to the right place.

IMPORTANT: I don't recommend every book on this list!

As I explained in an earlier post, not all books are suitable for all readers, and some books were obviously written by the Bad Idea Fairy.

My personal favorites are marked with an *, but use your CRAAP Criteria (it's really called that) to evaluate what you read.

Most of the links lead to Amazon.com, a few go to private websites. You can also ask your local library to order books for you...

See the list here:
https://haikufarm.blogspot.com/2018/04/in-which-i-post-list-of-books-about.html

Monday, April 23, 2018

Putting Weight on a Skinny Horse

KER.com - Full Article

November 3, 2000
By Kentucky Equine Research Staff

All the horses in the barn get the same amount of feed every day; it makes feeding time much simpler. The warmbloods look super. Their weight is good, and their coats are gleaming. However, the one Thoroughbred in the barn who arrived a little thin six months ago has not put on any weight. In fact, he has lost body condition. He is getting grain just like the other horses, so what could be wrong? A veterinarian has thoroughly examined the horse and nothing appears to be wrong. Could it be as simple as insufficient caloric intake? What kind of changes can be made to his feeding program to encourage weight gain?

Sometimes, getting a thin horse to gain weight is simply a matter of increasing the caloric density of the diet. Other times, the diet may need to be higher in calories because of a medical, psychological or environmental problem.

What makes a horse a hard keeper?

The metabolic rate determines whether a horse is an easy or hard keeper, and the variation between horses can be extreme.

Metabolism is the speed at which the body burns fuels for energy in order to maintain normal body functions. A slow metabolism can function on little input of fuel energy. Conversely, a fast metabolism needs a higher caloric intake in order to function properly. In general, members of certain breeds have faster metabolisms and need more food to maintain body condition than members of other breeds...

Read more here:
https://ker.com/equinews/putting-weight-on-a-skinny-horse/

Saturday, April 21, 2018

Condition Your Horse Like a Pro

Thehorse.com - Full Article

How to help performance horses of all types reach peak fitness.


By Nancy S. Loving, DVM | Apr 17, 2018

That competitive edge. It might look different for different disciplines, but this intangible has its roots in the same concept: conditioning. In short, conditioning develops the musculoskeletal, neurologic, and cardiovascular systems so they can perform athletic endeavors with the greatest efficiency and the least stress on the body.

In this article we’ll learn how riders from different disciplines condition their horses. While there is no magic recipe fit for all equestrian sports, the basic principles of conditioning remain the same across the board.
The Basics

To get fit for competition, your horse needs to be “legged up,” which entails preparing the musculoskeletal system to withstand a certain amount of impact, speed, and duration of work. Then you build upon this foundation in a stepwise fashion, first increasing distance at the walk and trot and then increasing intensity to include canter/lope and gallop and/or incline work. The initial exercise demand (completed at the walk, trot, slow canter) is generally known as long, slow distance (LSD) training, and it develops the cardiovascular system and aerobic energy pathways to fuel the muscles.

Aerobic metabolism occurs when muscle cells use energy sources in the presence of oxygen. Higher intensity exercise, such as sprints, gallops, difficult hill climbs, or jumping efforts, requires rapid muscle metabolism that taps into other energy sources in the absence of oxygen.

Use a heart rate monitor to assess your horse’s progress in real time; heart rates between 130 and 150 beats per minute (bpm) indicate a range that will improve fitness.

Building on this LSD foundation, many riders integrate strength-training exercises (such as hill work) and interval training (IT) speed work into their conditioning program to stimulate anaerobic efforts. Interval training involves sprints over a defined distance and/or time. To reach a training effect that taps into anaerobic fuel sources, the horse’s heart rate must exceed 165 bpm for at least two minutes...

Read more here:
https://thehorse.com/110066/condition-your-horse-like-a-pro/

Friday, April 20, 2018

Did You Know: Equine Gastric Ulcers Impact Stride Length

Thehorse.com - Full Article

Reduced performance, including a shorter stride length, is likely a consequence of pain caused by equine gastric ulcers.

By Edited Press Release | Apr 8, 2018

No matter the discipline in which you compete, your horse’s stride length is important. Longer strides can mean faster times, bigger jumps, and prettier movement. To get that edge, horse owners often focus on conditioning and joint health. Another key area to focus on is digestive health, specifically with regard to equine gastric ulcers.

The way performance horses are commonly fed, along with the stress of training, showing and traveling, causes acid levels to rise past the glandular portion of the horse’s stomach, leading to ulcers. That pain from sores on the stomach wall can cause your horse’s performance to suffer. Two out of three performance horses have stomach ulcers, and a study has shown that horses with ulcers have a shorter stride length than those without.

“Reduced performance, including a shorter stride length, is likely a consequence of gastric pain caused by ulcers,” says Hoyt Cheramie, DVM, MS, Dipl. ACVS, senior equine professional service veterinarian for Boehringer Ingelheim. “When we ask horses for precise athletic maneuvers—to run, jump, spin, and slide—if they have gastric discomfort, they aren’t going to be able perform as well.”

Preventing ulcers is the optimal way to ensure that they don’t inhibit performance. Omeprazole (a U.S. Food and Drug Administration-approved product is marketed as UlcerGard) inhibits acid production at the source—the proton pumps in the lower part of the stomach.

To prevent ulcers, in addition to omeprazole, Cheramie suggests feeding management changes when appropriate, such as increasing grazing time, using a slow-feed hay net, replacing calories from cereal grains with good-quality roughage or fat, and adding alfalfa to the diet.

Finding ways to increase stride length and ensure your horse is performing to the best of his ability is challenging enough. Don’t let equine gastric ulcers negatively affect performance. Keep digestive health and ulcer prevention a top priority.

More at:
https://thehorse.com/156998/did-you-know-equine-gastric-ulcers-impact-stride-length/

Thursday, April 12, 2018

Alfalfa for Endurance Horses?

KER.com

Question:
I manage endurance horses. I have experience using alfalfa during races, but I have been told to not use it between races, when I'm training, as it could cause metabolic problems. Can you please tell me your thoughts?

Answer:
Many performance horses benefit from alfalfa. The forage can be used successfully in endurance horses with some precautions.

At a competition, there is no better forage for endurance horses because of its palatability, high-calorie content, and nutrient profile. However, it is not usually fed to endurance horses as the only forage on a day-to-day basis...

Read more here:
https://ker.com/equinews/answer/alfalfa-endurance-horses/?platform=hootsuite

Tuesday, April 03, 2018

Livestock ELD Waiver Extended to Sept. 30 with Spending Bill

Drovers.com - Full Article

Wyatt Bechtel
March 23, 2018

When President Trump signed a $1.3 trillion omnibus spending bill it also passed an extension on the electronic logging device (ELD) implementation for livestock haulers. The bill passed on March 23 included a mandate for livestock and insect haulers to have a delay until Sept. 30, 2018.

Like other delays to the ELD it is believed that granting more time for implementation by livestock haulers will allow truckers to get in compliance. The extension also gives the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA) additional time to reevaluate the hours of service rule which have the potential to disrupt how livestock are hauled cross-country with new enforcement from the ELD...

Read more here:
https://www.drovers.com/article/livestock-eld-waiver-extended-sept-30-spending-bill

Windpuffs: Resolving a Common Swelling in Horses

Thehorse.com - Full Article

What prevention steps can I take for my horse’s rear leg swelling after exercise?

By Jean-Yin Tan, DVM, Dipl. ACVIM | Mar 28, 2018

Q. My 3-year-old mare’s rear legs swell around the tendon and fetlock area overnight after exercise. She is not lame or sore, but I have dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO)/furacin (nitrofurazone) wrapped it when it swells. This worked the first time but now it just helps a little. Is this swelling common, what it could be, and are there any prevention steps I could take?

Madison Rostykus, via e-mail

A. Fluid-filled swellings in the rear aspect of the tendon/fetlock area—called “windpuffs,” or synovial effusion of the tendon sheath—are a common condition in horses. They result from inflammation of the digital flexor tendon sheath, the structure that encases the deep and superficial digital tendons that run from the back of the knee down to the fetlock.

There are two types of windpuffs: idiopathic (of unknown cause, but they do not cause any problems) and pathologic (caused by disease).

Horses most frequently develop idiopathic windpuffs, especially when swelling is evident on both sides of the tendon and bilaterally symmetrical in both hind limbs. Idiopathic windpuffs tend to be chronic and can be worse in horses with anatomical predispositions, such as club foot, and after exercise, due to stress placed on the tendons. Lameness is not a component of idiopathic windpuffs, and this condition is not associated with -disease...

Read more here:
https://thehorse.com/114978/windpuffs-resolving-a-common-swelling/

Budget Bill Nixes Horse Slaughter, Boosts HPA Enforcement

Thehorse.com - Full Article

The 2018 Omnibus Spending Bill will impact the horse industry in several ways.


By Pat Raia | Mar 26, 2018

Horse processing plants will remain shuttered, the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) cannot sell wild horses without reservation, and the USDA Animal and Plant Inspection Service (APHIS) will receive additional funds to enforce the Horse Protection Act (HPA) under the 2018 Omnibus Spending Bill, which President Donald Trump signed into law on March 23.

Under the $1.3 billion measure, the USDA cannot use any of its funds to conduct horsemeat inspections processing plants, effectively preventing U.S. horse processing plant development.

The spending bill also forbids the Department of the Interior’s (DOI) BLM from selling wild horses and burros without reservation—that is, to any buyer—but allows the agency to transfer equids removed from the range to other federal state or local agencies to be sued as work animals.

“Any animal transferred loses its status as a wild free-roaming horse or burro,” the bill states...

Read more at:
https://thehorse.com/156678/budget-bill-nixes-horse-slaughter-boosts-hpa-enforcement/

Saturday, March 31, 2018

The Benefits of Feeding Flax

KrKHorseSense Blog - Full Article

March 4, 2018 by Dr. Kellon

Even fans of feeding flax may not realize all its benefits. It’s a very healthful supplemental feed item for horses of all ages, classes and uses.

People usually feed flax for its high omega-3 fatty acid content. There are two classes of fatty acids (the building blocks of fats) that must be in the diet, omega-3 and omega-6. Both are essential for peak immune function and the omega-3s contribute to normal homeostatic balancing of inflammatory reactions. Whole flax seeds are 30+% fat with the same high omega-3 profile as fresh grass. There are visible benefits to coat, skin and hooves. Omega-3s also support vision, the nervous system, development of young animals and keep all the cells’ membranes pliable.

At about 25% protein, flax seeds are also an excellent protein supplement with some key specific benefits. They are a good source of the most commonly deficient amino acid, lysine, and contain even higher levels of leucine which is the most common amino acid in skeletal muscle. It’s also a very good source of methionine, the sulfur containing amino acid that is becoming increasingly scarce. In fact, it is close to meeting the specifications for equine “ideal protein” as set forth by Bryden.

On the mineral end, flax seeds have 2 to 4 times more magnesium than hays. The calcium:phosphorus ratio is reversed at just a little under 1:2 but this complements alfalfa and most grass hays as well. Unlike hays, on average flax seed is low in manganese but has adequate zinc and copper in correct ratios to each other...

Read more here:
https://drkhorsesense.wordpress.com/2018/03/04/the-benefits-of-feeding-flax/

Tuesday, March 27, 2018

Work Level and Feeding Horses

Thehorse.com - Full Article

Make sure your horse’s diet supports his regular exercise program with these tips.

By Clair Thunes, PhD | Mar 26, 2018

Q. Many grains’ and concentrates’ recommended feeding rate is amount is based on the horse’s body weight and how much work he is getting: light, moderate, or heavy. I’ve found online resources for how to calculate body weight but not to determine work level. How do I accurately determine my horse’s work level?

A. Work level can be a hard thing to judge accurately. As a starting point I recommend you consider what a typical week looks like for your horse. This should include both the work your horse does and also how he’s housed. Is your horse at pasture 24 hours a, day 7 days a week, or is he in a stall? Perhaps he’s out part time. A horse that’s stalled at all times but hacked out every day at the walk with little trot or longed for a short period is likely only expending the same amount of energy as a horse that lives out 24 hours a day and without additional work. You should categorize this as “no work” and feed the maintenance requirement...

Read more here:
https://thehorse.com/156680/work-level-and-feeding-horses/

Monday, March 26, 2018

Take the 2018 AHP Equine Survey

AHPHorseSurvey.com

Have you hugged your horse lately? Taking the 2018 American Horse Pubications Equine Industry Survey is a way horse owners can show and share their love for horses. The survey closes soon.

Show you care at www.ahphorsesurvey.com by taking and sharing with fellow horse owners.

#ahphorsesurvey2018, #zoetis, #ahpequinemedia

Saturday, March 24, 2018

Burro racing tests human, animal endurance

DurangoHerald.com - Full Article

Sport built on Colorado’s mining heritage celebrates 70 years


By Sue McMillin Special to the Herald
Saturday, March 24, 2018 5:03 AM

Pack burro racing is not about the fastest burro, or the fastest human. It’s about the team – and, really, mostly about the burro.

“A burro race starts in the pasture,” said Brad Wann, spokesman for the Western Pack Burro Association and a burro owner and racer. “Trust is important with burros; they need to know you.

“You’ve got to train with that donkey and have a relationship with your ass.”

The animals are interchangeably called burros, donkeys or asses, with plenty of wordplay on the latter. But hey, if you run up to 29 miles and over 13,000-foot mountain passes with a burro, you’re probably entitled to a few silly puns...

Read more here:
https://durangoherald.com/articles/215138-burro-racing-tests-human-animal-endurance