Friday, January 19, 2018

Is Sugar Beet Pulp Too High in Sugar for Horses?

Thehorse.com - Full Article

By Clair Thunes, PhD
Jan 15, 2018

Q. Last week in your article about helping horses stay warm in winter you mentioned feeding sugar beet pulp to horses in need of extra calories from a forage source. It doesn’t seem like that would be a good choice for a lot of horses. Isn’t sugar beet pulp high in sugar?

A. The name certainly implies that this common equine feed ingredient is high in sugar. However, you might be surprised to learn that by the time it makes it to your horse’s feed bucket sugar beet pulp, in most cases, is actually very low in sugar.

Sugar beets are a root crop with a high concentration of sucrose sugar (think table sugar) grown commercially for sugar production. According to the American Sugarbeet Growers Association, sugar beets are grown in many Western and Northern states. The sugar beet is about a foot long and weighs between 2 to 5 pounds. With a sucrose content of about 18%, sugar beets make up a little over 50% of the domestically produced sugar.

However, we’re not feeding horses whole beets. Rather we feed what‘s left after manufacturers have extracted sugar for human use. What’s left is referred to sugar beet pulp and is a source of fermentable fibrous material that requires microbial fermentation in the horse’s hindgut. Sugar beet pulp is used extensively in livestock feed and, for horses, is sold as an ingredient in commercial feeds or separately as shreds or pellets...

Read more here:
http://www.thehorse.com/articles/40143/is-sugar-beet-pulp-too-high-in-sugar-for-horses?utm_source=Newsletter&utm_medium=reader-favorites&utm_campaign=01-19-2018

The Arabians who conquered Scottsdale

US.Blastingnews.com - Full Article

These sleek desert horses have become big business in the American Southwest.


B. Williams Author (Curated by J. Strawberry)

Arabians have conquered Scottsdale, Arizona with love and affection - not the warring Bedouin tribes from the Arabian Peninsula [VIDEO] thousands of years ago, but rather the 1,000-pound, four-hoof Arabians. They yearn to be stroked and scratched, and the signature neck - missing one vertebra - loves to have a human arm around it. If you blow in their nostrils they will follow you anywhere.

“Arabian horses create a bond with their owners and caretakers that is unlike any other breed,” Gary McDonald told me after touring his Arabian farm in Scottsdale. “They are the most intelligent of the breeds and the intelligence makes them interactive, playful and easy to be trained.”

In 1954, Ed Tweed and 20 other breeders formed the #Arabian Horse Association of Arizona, with Ed as its first president, but America’s interest in the horses goes further back in history than that...

Read more here:
http://us.blastingnews.com/business/2018/01/the-arabians-who-conquered-scottsdale-002288341.html

Tuesday, January 16, 2018

Will the new laws for hauling horses affect you?



HorseCouncil.org

Is your truck/trailer a CMV (Commercial Motor Vehicle)?
Do you need a CDL (Commercial Drivers License) to haul your horses?
If so, you will need an ELD (Electronic Logging Device).

Electronic Logging Device (ELD) Mandate & Commercial Driver’s License (CDL) Requirements:


In an effort to help provide clarity to the ELD Mandate that was previously set to go into effect December 18, 2017- the AHC has put together two brochures to help provide insight into this already complex issue.

To see the ELD Mandate brochure and the CDL brochure, see this page:
http://www.horsecouncil.org/eld-mandate-cdl-requirements/

Monday, January 15, 2018

Why is the Frog of My Horse's Foot Falling Off?

Thehorse.com - Full Article

By Britt Conklin, DVM
Jan 3, 2018

Q. After a recent ride, I picked up my horse's hoof and found that the frog was hanging off. I've included a photograph I took of it. Why is my horse's frog falling off, and what should I do about it? Is he okay?

Via e-mail

A. The picture reflects a normal process in the horse's foot called exfoliation. Many people understand exfoliation in terms of human skin cells whereby dead cells are chemically or mechanically removed to improve the aesthetic look of the skin. The horse's sole and frog are similar in their cellular makeup to skin and therefore undergo a process whereby older cells "shed" over time...

Read more here:
http://www.thehorse.com/articles/34438/why-is-the-frog-of-my-horses-foot-falling-off?utm_source=Newsletter&utm_medium=lameness&utm_campaign=01-03-2018

Today, I sent an email to the AERC BoD …

EnduranceIntrospection.com - Full Article

by Patti Stedman | Jan 12, 2018 | Patti's Blog |

[If you are an AERC member and would like to voice an opinion on this topic, here’s a link to email your BoD members. Please note that most of them do not read or participate on Facebook, so while such discussions may be gratifying and allow you to vent your spleen or defend yourself, this is probably the more effective means of communicating your views as a member. https://aerc.org/static/Membership_Bod_Board.aspx ]

Good morning AERC BoD and members, USEF and FEI representatives.

I know a great many of you, and I know how difficult it can be to navigate the turbulent waters of the AERC BoD or Committee Chair role. I served on the BoD for one term, and also served for a long time as Chair of the Ride Managers’ Committee. So first off, thank you for your service to the organization and the sport I know we all love.

I’ve learned that the amount of time spent on Facebook and my mental health are inversely proportional.

The divisiveness of the discussions re: AERC’s relationship with Region VII and FEI and USEF are savage. I know that many of you do not participate on Facebook (see above; I understand why not) but there is a reality that we need to face. Whether or not the USEF/FEI/Region 7 issue itself affects our organization and the outside perception of it, the social media fights certainly do. We are not putting our best face forward and I think we’ve all realized how critical Facebook has been to AERC’s growth/new member recruiting over the past 8-10 years...

Read more here:
http://enduranceintrospection.com/wp/today-i-sent-an-email-to-the-aerc-bod/

Thursday, January 11, 2018

Forage-Only Diet a 'Win' for Standardbred Racehorses

Thehorse.com - Full Article

By Christa Lesté-Lasserre, MA
Jul 28, 2017

Horses in few disciplines require as much high-energy nutrition as racehorses. So it’s no surprise that, traditionally, a large part of a racehorse’s food ration is energy-dense concentrated feeds. But concentrates are hard on the equine stomach, contribute to gastric ulcers, and lack the bulk and fiber content that keep a horse’s gut healthy.

In an ideal world, horses—even racehorses—would thrive off forage alone. But given their intense training programs, could that ever be possible? Swedish researchers say yes, not only is it possible but it can also be beneficial...

Read more here:
http://www.thehorse.com/articles/39477/forage-only-diet-a-win-for-standardbred-racehorses

Friday, January 05, 2018

Cold Weather Laminitis?

HorseNetwork.com - Full Article

December 30 2017
ELEANOR KELLON, VMD

It happens every winter. A horse that may not even have a prior history of laminitis is found to be very lame and reluctant to move. It’s more than the typical hesitation horses show on hard, frozen ground. Looks like laminitis but the feet aren’t hot. What’s going on?

Cold-induced hoof pain strikes horses with insulin resistance. IR is a well described risk factor for laminitis and even when the horse is not glaringly lame it is causing damage to the laminae. We haven’t uncovered all the mechanisms behind laminar damage from high insulin levels but one known factor is elevated levels of endothelin-1.

Endothelin-1 is a peptide (small protein) produced by the cells lining the interior of blood vessels. It is the most potent vasoconstrictor known and is normally balanced by production of the vasodilating chemical nitric oxide. Cold-induced reduction in blood supply to the hoof when superimposed on the pre-existing high endothelin-1 activity may explain why some IR horses develop hoof pain in cold weather but normal horses do not...

Read more here:
https://horsenetwork.com/2017/12/cold-weather-laminitis/?utm_source=MASTER&utm_campaign=a7db6e30de-HNS_2018_1_5&utm_medium=email&utm_term=0_5694ca6b0c-a7db6e30de-84641243&mc_cid=a7db6e30de&mc_eid=b3c9897994

Thursday, January 04, 2018

Should I Feed Alfalfa Between Endurance Races?

Equinews.com - Full Article

Q:
I manage endurance horses. I have experience using alfalfa during races, but I have been told to not use it between races, when I’m training, as it could cause metabolic problems. Can you please tell me your thoughts?

A:
Many performance horses benefit from alfalfa. The forage can be used successfully in endurance horses with some precautions.

At a competition, there is no better forage for endurance horses because of its palatability, high calorie content, and nutrient profile. However, it is not usually fed to endurance horses as the only forage on a day-to-day basis.

The concern with feeding alfalfa daily is thought to lie in its high calcium content. The mechanism is not completely understood, but researchers believe that daily high calcium intake may affect the body's ability to mobilize calcium during times of accelerated need, such as those associated with long-distance competition...

Read more here:
http://www.equinews.com/answer-exchange/alfalfa-and-endurance-horses?platform=hootsuite