Thursday, April 12, 2018

Alfalfa for Endurance Horses?

KER.com

Question:
I manage endurance horses. I have experience using alfalfa during races, but I have been told to not use it between races, when I'm training, as it could cause metabolic problems. Can you please tell me your thoughts?

Answer:
Many performance horses benefit from alfalfa. The forage can be used successfully in endurance horses with some precautions.

At a competition, there is no better forage for endurance horses because of its palatability, high-calorie content, and nutrient profile. However, it is not usually fed to endurance horses as the only forage on a day-to-day basis...

Read more here:
https://ker.com/equinews/answer/alfalfa-endurance-horses/?platform=hootsuite

Tuesday, April 03, 2018

Livestock ELD Waiver Extended to Sept. 30 with Spending Bill

Drovers.com - Full Article

Wyatt Bechtel
March 23, 2018

When President Trump signed a $1.3 trillion omnibus spending bill it also passed an extension on the electronic logging device (ELD) implementation for livestock haulers. The bill passed on March 23 included a mandate for livestock and insect haulers to have a delay until Sept. 30, 2018.

Like other delays to the ELD it is believed that granting more time for implementation by livestock haulers will allow truckers to get in compliance. The extension also gives the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA) additional time to reevaluate the hours of service rule which have the potential to disrupt how livestock are hauled cross-country with new enforcement from the ELD...

Read more here:
https://www.drovers.com/article/livestock-eld-waiver-extended-sept-30-spending-bill

Windpuffs: Resolving a Common Swelling in Horses

Thehorse.com - Full Article

What prevention steps can I take for my horse’s rear leg swelling after exercise?

By Jean-Yin Tan, DVM, Dipl. ACVIM | Mar 28, 2018

Q. My 3-year-old mare’s rear legs swell around the tendon and fetlock area overnight after exercise. She is not lame or sore, but I have dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO)/furacin (nitrofurazone) wrapped it when it swells. This worked the first time but now it just helps a little. Is this swelling common, what it could be, and are there any prevention steps I could take?

Madison Rostykus, via e-mail

A. Fluid-filled swellings in the rear aspect of the tendon/fetlock area—called “windpuffs,” or synovial effusion of the tendon sheath—are a common condition in horses. They result from inflammation of the digital flexor tendon sheath, the structure that encases the deep and superficial digital tendons that run from the back of the knee down to the fetlock.

There are two types of windpuffs: idiopathic (of unknown cause, but they do not cause any problems) and pathologic (caused by disease).

Horses most frequently develop idiopathic windpuffs, especially when swelling is evident on both sides of the tendon and bilaterally symmetrical in both hind limbs. Idiopathic windpuffs tend to be chronic and can be worse in horses with anatomical predispositions, such as club foot, and after exercise, due to stress placed on the tendons. Lameness is not a component of idiopathic windpuffs, and this condition is not associated with -disease...

Read more here:
https://thehorse.com/114978/windpuffs-resolving-a-common-swelling/

Budget Bill Nixes Horse Slaughter, Boosts HPA Enforcement

Thehorse.com - Full Article

The 2018 Omnibus Spending Bill will impact the horse industry in several ways.


By Pat Raia | Mar 26, 2018

Horse processing plants will remain shuttered, the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) cannot sell wild horses without reservation, and the USDA Animal and Plant Inspection Service (APHIS) will receive additional funds to enforce the Horse Protection Act (HPA) under the 2018 Omnibus Spending Bill, which President Donald Trump signed into law on March 23.

Under the $1.3 billion measure, the USDA cannot use any of its funds to conduct horsemeat inspections processing plants, effectively preventing U.S. horse processing plant development.

The spending bill also forbids the Department of the Interior’s (DOI) BLM from selling wild horses and burros without reservation—that is, to any buyer—but allows the agency to transfer equids removed from the range to other federal state or local agencies to be sued as work animals.

“Any animal transferred loses its status as a wild free-roaming horse or burro,” the bill states...

Read more at:
https://thehorse.com/156678/budget-bill-nixes-horse-slaughter-boosts-hpa-enforcement/

Saturday, March 31, 2018

The Benefits of Feeding Flax

KrKHorseSense Blog - Full Article

March 4, 2018 by Dr. Kellon

Even fans of feeding flax may not realize all its benefits. It’s a very healthful supplemental feed item for horses of all ages, classes and uses.

People usually feed flax for its high omega-3 fatty acid content. There are two classes of fatty acids (the building blocks of fats) that must be in the diet, omega-3 and omega-6. Both are essential for peak immune function and the omega-3s contribute to normal homeostatic balancing of inflammatory reactions. Whole flax seeds are 30+% fat with the same high omega-3 profile as fresh grass. There are visible benefits to coat, skin and hooves. Omega-3s also support vision, the nervous system, development of young animals and keep all the cells’ membranes pliable.

At about 25% protein, flax seeds are also an excellent protein supplement with some key specific benefits. They are a good source of the most commonly deficient amino acid, lysine, and contain even higher levels of leucine which is the most common amino acid in skeletal muscle. It’s also a very good source of methionine, the sulfur containing amino acid that is becoming increasingly scarce. In fact, it is close to meeting the specifications for equine “ideal protein” as set forth by Bryden.

On the mineral end, flax seeds have 2 to 4 times more magnesium than hays. The calcium:phosphorus ratio is reversed at just a little under 1:2 but this complements alfalfa and most grass hays as well. Unlike hays, on average flax seed is low in manganese but has adequate zinc and copper in correct ratios to each other...

Read more here:
https://drkhorsesense.wordpress.com/2018/03/04/the-benefits-of-feeding-flax/

Tuesday, March 27, 2018

Work Level and Feeding Horses

Thehorse.com - Full Article

Make sure your horse’s diet supports his regular exercise program with these tips.

By Clair Thunes, PhD | Mar 26, 2018

Q. Many grains’ and concentrates’ recommended feeding rate is amount is based on the horse’s body weight and how much work he is getting: light, moderate, or heavy. I’ve found online resources for how to calculate body weight but not to determine work level. How do I accurately determine my horse’s work level?

A. Work level can be a hard thing to judge accurately. As a starting point I recommend you consider what a typical week looks like for your horse. This should include both the work your horse does and also how he’s housed. Is your horse at pasture 24 hours a, day 7 days a week, or is he in a stall? Perhaps he’s out part time. A horse that’s stalled at all times but hacked out every day at the walk with little trot or longed for a short period is likely only expending the same amount of energy as a horse that lives out 24 hours a day and without additional work. You should categorize this as “no work” and feed the maintenance requirement...

Read more here:
https://thehorse.com/156680/work-level-and-feeding-horses/

Monday, March 26, 2018

Take the 2018 AHP Equine Survey

AHPHorseSurvey.com

Have you hugged your horse lately? Taking the 2018 American Horse Pubications Equine Industry Survey is a way horse owners can show and share their love for horses. The survey closes soon.

Show you care at www.ahphorsesurvey.com by taking and sharing with fellow horse owners.

#ahphorsesurvey2018, #zoetis, #ahpequinemedia

Saturday, March 24, 2018

Burro racing tests human, animal endurance

DurangoHerald.com - Full Article

Sport built on Colorado’s mining heritage celebrates 70 years


By Sue McMillin Special to the Herald
Saturday, March 24, 2018 5:03 AM

Pack burro racing is not about the fastest burro, or the fastest human. It’s about the team – and, really, mostly about the burro.

“A burro race starts in the pasture,” said Brad Wann, spokesman for the Western Pack Burro Association and a burro owner and racer. “Trust is important with burros; they need to know you.

“You’ve got to train with that donkey and have a relationship with your ass.”

The animals are interchangeably called burros, donkeys or asses, with plenty of wordplay on the latter. But hey, if you run up to 29 miles and over 13,000-foot mountain passes with a burro, you’re probably entitled to a few silly puns...

Read more here:
https://durangoherald.com/articles/215138-burro-racing-tests-human-animal-endurance

Wednesday, March 21, 2018

Outback encounter questions all we know about horse shoes

Warwickdailynews.com.au - Full Article

by MARIAN FAA
21st Mar 2018

IT WAS the last day of mustering at Mt Surprise Station in July 1983.

Sitting contently on the back on of his little Arab stock horse, waiting for a mob of cattle to come over the creek, Bill Diemling saw something that changed his life forever.

"Right to this day it is as clear in my mind as if it was yesterday.

"The picture I get, the feeling I get, it seemed to me it was almost a sign from heaven."

Down in the dirt before him, Mr Diemling noticed some horse footprints that caught his attention.

"It was something completely unlike anything I had ever seen before."

As a farrier who'd worked with horses all around the world, Mr Diemling thought he'd seen it all.

But these hoofprints - an impression left by wild brumbies - were unique.

"Everything I had seen up until that point had been from a domesticated background but those footprints were natural," he said.

"They were more spherical in shape, which was completely strange to me."

Intrigued, Mr Diemling took a plaster cast of the prints back to the United Kingdom where he lived, and began extensive research which led him to develop a revolutionary style of horse shoe based on the natural hooves of wild brumbies...

Read more here:
https://www.warwickdailynews.com.au/news/wild-outback-encounter-spurs-farrier-revolution/3366415/

Thursday, March 15, 2018

In which I give tools to readers to evaluate endurance books

Haikufarm Blog - Full Article

"Fake news" isn't always about politics.
Sometimes it's about horses.


March 13, 2018
By Aarene Storms

I recently wrote an article for Endurance News magazine that included a list of books written about long distance riding. (I will publish the list here after EN prints the April issue), and was surprised at the number of books that have been published in the last few years.

I guess I shouldn't be surprised. When we were shopping Endurance 101 out to publishers in 2011 and 2012, this was the way a book got made: a publisher bought it from the author, and then published it, and then sent (some) money to the author.

Late in 2011, things began to change.

As a result of the economic downturn after 2008, mainstream publishers were buying fewer books.

At the same time, self-publishing suddenly got easier. Amazon and others made editing software readily available, and gave authors a platform to distribute work to the whole world.

There has always been a strong stigma attached to "vanity press" and "self-published" books. I learned in library school that self-published books were not good enough to be bought by a publishing house. They were (usually) poorly researched by (frequently) unqualified authors, (often) badly written, poorly (or not at all) edited for copy mistakes, had low (or no) standards for content, and were (cheaply) printed on substandard paper without regard to quality and practices that apply to proper books.

These stigmas are not always justified now. Lots of qualified authors (I am one of them) do the math and figure out that we can reach our audience just as well--sometimes better--without a mainstream publisher...and without a big publisher to share with, we can keep more of the (sometimes meager) profits.

Lots of authors (I am one of them) hire a copy editor, work with content fact-checkers, include professional photos for cover and interior illustration, and print on good paper stock with a sturdy binding.

It's a bucket-load of work to make a book properly, as Monica documented in her post.

I'm trying to be tactful when I say this:

Not everybody who writes and publishes a book does the work...

Read more here:
https://haikufarm.blogspot.com/2018/03/in-which-i-give-tools-to-readers-to.html

Pilot Study Addresses Effects of Rider Weight on Equine Performance

Thehorse.com - Full Article

Researchers found that if a rider is excessively heavy for a particular horse, equine performance can be negatively impacted.


By Edited Press Release | Mar 13, 2018

Results of a new pilot study on the effects of rider weight on equine performance show that high rider-to-horse body weight ratios can induce temporary lameness and discomfort. In simple terms, if the rider is excessively heavy for the horse in question it can have a negative impact on the performance of the horse.

Ultimately the study should help with the development of guidelines to help all riders assess if they are the right weight for the horse or pony they intend to ride to enhance both equine welfare and rider comfort and enjoyment.

“While all the horses finished the study moving as well as when they started, the results showed a substantial temporary effect of rider weight as a proportion of horse weight,” said study leader Sue Dyson, MA, Vet MB, PhD, DEO, FRCVS, head of Clinical Orthopaedics at the Animal Health Trust’s Centre for Equine Studies, in Newmarket, U.K.

“The results do not mean that heavy riders should not ride but suggest that if they do they should ride a horse of appropriate size and fitness, with a saddle that is correctly fitted for both horse and rider...

Read more here:
https://thehorse.com/155768/pilot-study-addresses-effects-of-rider-weight-on-equine-performance/

Wednesday, March 07, 2018

Where the Wild Things Are

Tralmeister.com - Full Article

February 28 2018
by Robert Eversole

As published in the Horsemen’s Corral Feb. 2018 issue.

Last August in Idaho a woman was attacked by a bear. For weeks afterward, local newspapers printed page upon page about the encounter, warning their readers that dangerous animals were prowling the countryside. What if you were planning a ride or a horse camping trip when you read about this attack? Would you stay home, take extra precautions, or venture elsewhere?

The great counterweight to the lure of the outdoors is the fear of the unknown. What if the weather turns for the worse? What if my horse acts up? What if I become lunch for a grizzly?

Here’s the hard truth. Most people spend entirely too much time and energy worrying about menacing—but low-chance threats like bears, cougars, and wolves, and not nearly enough thought concerning themselves with the dull and common dangers like bees, blisters, and hypothermia. To confirm this theory, take a quick test. How many times have you been mauled by a bear or a mountain lion? Now compare that figure with the number of times you’ve forgotten a piece of tack, dealt with an unruly horse, or encountered bees on a ride...

Read more here:
https://www.trailmeister.com/where-the-wild-things-are/?utm_source=MailingList&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=March+2018+general+newsletter

Tuesday, March 06, 2018

Contemplating the Realities of 50

EnduranceIntrospection.com - Full Story

by Patti Stedman | Mar 3, 2018

I’m not talking about the fifty-mile distance, I’m talking about the half-century mark of longevity, the hallmark birthday when the AARP begins to send you postcards, the age at which (I read and now believe, based on a one-rat self study) women become invisible.

I hit the big 5-0 in July without much fanfare. Some time with family friends at my brother’s family pool, amazing margaritas with my bestie, no big whup. In a moment of vain frivolity, I got myself a set of eyelash extensions — Anita laughed in horror and told me it looked like spiders were crawling out of my eyes.

But there are some realities about this age, and some things which simply cannot be denied if you’re a Face Reality Head On type of girl.

• It is not untrue, that conventional wisdom about spending the first 50 years of your life accumulating stuff and the rest of your time on earth attempting to get rid of it. I rented a 30-yard roll off box this fall because I was suddenly overtaken by the need to purge items accumulated on our farm over the last twenty years. (Richard did not read this conventional wisdom. At nigh-unto-52, he is terribly attached to items like empty yogurt containers and a generator which is, as he describes it, “a piece of junk” and long-ago replaced by a newer one.)

• You really do find yourself with fewer effs to give, and look forward, in a very detached way, to having even fewer. It’s not that I’ve given up diplomacy entirely, but I no longer look inward to fix issues which are clearly not mine to fix. Sure, I circle the drain of self-doubt from time to time, but the self rescue has become quicker and easier.

• My seat, in so many ways, is not what it used to be. And let’s be frank, no one with any significant degree of horsemanship has ever described me as a “Velcro butt.” But somewhere between 25 and double that age, the ability to ride bravely through nonsense with a laugh and no heart-clutching fear has eroded to near non-existence. Two significant concussions from horses I would now consider “too much horse” and a recent ruptured neck disc diagnosis, and yep, I have dropped a category or two in the Risk Tolerance spectrum. (And see above, I give no effs about standing up and saying so.)

That leads me to this blog...

Read more here:
http://enduranceintrospection.com/wp/contemplating-the-realities-of-50/

Friday, March 02, 2018

AHCF Announces Results of 2017 Economic Impact Study

Horsecouncil.org

February 28, 2018

(Washington, DC)- The American Horse Council Foundation (AHCF) is pleased to announce the results of its anticipated 2017 Economic Impact Study of the U.S. Horse Industry. The AHCF would like to thank The Innovation Group for their work on this important study.

The equine industry in the U.S. generates approximately $122 billion in total economic impact, an increase from $102 billion in the 2005 Economic Impact Study. The industry also provides a total employment impact of 1.74 million, and generates $79 billion in total salaries, wages, and benefits. The current number of horses in the United States also stands at 7.2 million. Texas, California, and Florida continue to be the top three states with the highest population of horses.

“Those involved in the equine industry already know how important it is to the U.S. economy. Having these updated numbers is critical not only to the AHC’s efforts up on Capitol Hill, but also for the industry to demonstrate to the general public how much of a role the equine has in American households,” said AHC President Julie Broadway. “While the number of horses in the US has decreased, this was not entirely unexpected due to the decline in breed registration trends over the last few years.”

Another bright spot for the industry: 38 million, or 30.5%, of U.S. households contain a horse enthusiast, and 38% of participants are under the age of 18. Additionally, approximately 80 million acres of land is reserved for horse-related activities.

“For this update of the study we wanted to get a better picture of the number of youth in the pipeline, which is a number that we have not previously included in our economic impact studies. Additionally, being able to put a number of the amount of land use for equine-related activities is essential to ensuring that we are able to continue to protect and preserve that land for its intended use,” said Ms. Broadway.

The National Economic Impact Study is available for purchase through the AHC website here: http://www.horsecouncil.org/horsecouncil-publications/. Additionally, the 15 state breakouts will be available for purchase by the beginning of April. If you have any questions, please contact the AHC at info@horsecouncil.org.

Wednesday, February 28, 2018

Behavior Problems in Mares: Ovaries Aren’t Always to Blame

Thehorse.com - Full Article

Removing the ovaries won’t fix other issues, from static shock to bladder adhesions, that can make mares behave badly.

By Alexandra Beckstett, The Horse Managing Editor | Feb 2, 2018

The veterinarians at the University of Pennsylvania’s New Bolton Center regularly evaluate mares for suspected ovary-related behavior issues. In most cases, however, they find the root cause is something else entirely.

Sue McDonnell, PhD, CAAB, adjunct professor of reproductive behavior and founding head of the University’s Equine Behavior Program, has been evaluating these so-called problem mares for decades. At the 2017 American Association of Equine Practitioners convention, held Nov. 17-21 in San Antonio, Texas, she described how the team at New Bolton Center, in Kennett Square, evaluates them and shared some case examples.

“Diagnosing the root causes (for behavior problems) is important for welfare, safety, and client satisfaction,” she said.

When evaluating a mare whose owner complains of “marish” or “hormonal” behavior, McDonnell said she first obtains and views a 24-hour video sample of the horse in its stall. During this period, she will watch for behavior patterns suggesting the mare is in discomfort, such as tail- or hip-rubbing, udder-nuzzling, kicking at walls, etc...

Read more here:
https://thehorse.com/139452/behavior-problems-in-mares-ovaries-arent-always-to-blame/

Tuesday, February 27, 2018

The Pony Express: Long Rides and a Short Life

Horse-canada.com - Full Article

Horses & History | April 28, 2015

By the time the famous Pony Express closed its doors and retired its riders and horses on October 24, 1861, just 18 months after starting, it had already achieved some noteworthy accomplishments. The horses and riders covered about 250 miles a day in a 24-hour period; 35,000 pieces of mail were delivered during the service, there were more than 170 stations, and 80 riders used between 400 and 500 horses.

During its 18 months of its existence, there was just one mail delivery lost. This happened during Paiute Indian raids in 1860 and altogether the raids cost 16 men their lives, 150 horses were stolen or driven away, and $75,000 in equipment and supplies were lost. The mail pouch that was lost in these raids reached New York City two years later...

Read more here:
https://horse-canada.com/horses-and-history/the-pony-express-long-rides-and-a-short-life/?utm_source=Enews+Feb+26%2C+2018&utm_campaign=EnewsFeb262018&utm_medium=email

Sunday, February 25, 2018

Managing Equine Gastric Ulcers Through Nutrition

KER.com - Full Article

April 13, 2016
By Kentucky Equine Research Staff

Scientists know that diet contributes to the formation of gastric ulcers in horses, but what can horse owners do about established ulcers? Can diet adjustments help heal painful divots in the stomach lining? According to a recent study*, medication is still necessary for most horses, but diet and nutritional supplements can also play important roles in successfully managing ulcers.

“All ages and breeds of horses are susceptible to equine gastric ulcer syndrome, or EGUS, with ulcers forming not only in the squamous portion of the stomach but also the distal esophagus, glandular portion of the stomach, and the proximal aspect of the duodenum,” explained Kathleen Crandell, Ph.D., a Kentucky Equine Research (KER) nutritionist.

According to the study, medications, principally omeprazole, should be used to heal ulcers initially. The following management tactics will help maintain healing and prevent recurrence...

Read more here:
https://ker.com/equinews/managing-equine-gastric-ulcers-nutrition/?utm_source=KER+Newsletter&utm_campaign=46f302930e-Focus_digestive&utm_medium=email&utm_term=0_0d95781dfc-46f302930e-11166&mc_cid=46f302930e&mc_eid=6283eb0e4a

Friday, February 23, 2018

Ancient DNA upends the horse family tree

Sciencemag.org - Full Article

By Elizabeth Pennisi
Feb. 22, 2018

Horses radically changed human history, revolutionizing how people traveled, farmed, and even made war. Yet every time we think we’ve answered the question of where these animals came from, another study brings us back to square one. Such is the case with an extensive new study of ancient horse DNA, which largely disproves the current theory: that modern horses arose more than 5000 years ago in Kazakhstan. Instead, the new work suggests that modern-day domestic horses come from an as-yet-undiscovered stock. The research also shows that the world’s only remaining wild horses, called Przewalski’s horses, are not truly wild.

“This paper radically changes our thinking about the origin of modern horses,” says Molly McCue, a veterinarian and equine geneticist at the University of Minnesota College of Veterinary Medicine in St. Paul, who was not involved with the work. “It’s an exciting and surprising finding.”

Until now, many researchers had thought that the Botai culture, an ancient group of hunters and herders that relied on horses for food and possibly transport in what today is northern Kazakhstan, first harnessed horses 5500 years ago...

Read more here:
http://www.sciencemag.org/news/2018/02/ancient-dna-upends-horse-family-tree

Tuesday, February 20, 2018

Four Dietary Tips for Healthy Horse Transport

KER.com - Full Article

March 15, 2016
By Kentucky Equine Research Staff

Even the shortest trip in a horse trailer for the most seasoned equine jet-setter causes some level of stress due to isolation, confinement, noise, vibration, and altered balance. In addition, physical injuries, respiratory diseases, colic, laminitis, enterocolitis, and tying-up pose real concerns for horses and owners during transport.

“Considering the impact of diet prior to and during transport can make the difference between arriving with a healthy or sick horse,” advised Kathleen Crandell, Ph.D., equine nutritionist at Kentucky Equine Research (KER).

According to a recent study*, there are four key ways owners can minimize adverse health effects when shipping horses:

Read more here:
https://ker.com/equinews/four-dietary-tips-healthy-horse-transport/?utm_source=KER+Newsletter&utm_campaign=46f302930e-Focus_digestive&utm_medium=email&utm_term=0_0d95781dfc-46f302930e-11166&mc_cid=46f302930e&mc_eid=6283eb0e4a

Friday, February 16, 2018

ELD and CDL Webinar Recording

Horsecouncil.org - Listen

February 14 2018

While registration filled up quickly for the AHC's First Quarter 2018 webinar on the Electronic Logging Device (ELD) and Commercial Drivers License (CDL) requirements, the AHC recorded the webinar in order to share with our members.

This is a multifactorial issue, with requirements for a CDL varying from state to state. The AHC is planning on hosting a second webinar on this topic in the coming weeks, and will be meeting with the Department of Transportation this coming Friday to further address how to best communicate the complexities of the requirements to the equine industry.

The AHC recommends contacting your state Department of Transportation for specific questions on the CDL regulations for your state. To view a list of state by state contacts, please click here.

If you have any questions, please contact the AHC at info@horsecouncil.org .



Wednesday, February 14, 2018

Conditions of conditioning – Tips for spring conditioning

Tryondailybulletin.com - Full Article

By Catherine Hunter
February 13, 2018

Spring is just around the corner — the crickets and bullfrogs are starting to sing and the warm weather is coming.

If it ever stops raining long enough to ride, Foothills horse lovers will again be enjoying the trails after this exceptionally cold winter.

While we are all shaking off a little cabin fever, it is important to consider the horse’s condition if they have been off from work through the winter. Asking a horse to go on a long or fast ride when they are not in shape can not only damage the horse’s heart, wind, tendons, joints and muscles, it can betray the animal’s trust, and make them fear being ridden again.

Walking and trotting is the best place to start a fitness program. Rides in the beginning of the conditioning program should be kept short, approximately 20 to 30 minutes, and can gradually increase as the horse gains stamina.

In the beginning of the program, the rider should limit the number of days per week the horse is ridden. If the horse has done nothing but loaf in the field since early November, a five-day per week program will be too much to start. Consider riding one or two days, and then giving the horse a day or two off. If the rider wants to ride more often, she can gradually build up to five or more days a week...

Read more here:
http://www.tryondailybulletin.com/2018/02/13/conditions-of-conditioning-tips-for-spring-conditioning/

Rutgers Seminar Focuses On Equine Gastrointestinal Health

Tapinto.net - Full Article

By LILLIAN SHUPE
February 13, 2018 at 12:51 PM

NEW BRUNSWICK, N.J. — Horse owners gathered on a rainy Feb. 11 to learn more about gastrointestinal health and management at the Horse Management Seminar hosted by the Rutgers Equine Science Center and Rutgers Cooperative Extension.

Dr. Burt Staniar from Pennsylvania State University got things started with “How does physically effective fiber behave in the equine gut? – A visual tour.” He said that the effect of the particle size of different feeds and how it affects digestion has been studied in cattle, but not in horses. But horses are not cows and more study needs to be done, he said. He said the larger the pieces of feed are, the more the horse has to chew. The more it chews, the more saliva is produced. More saliva means the acids in the stomach are better buffered and that prevents ulcer formation...

Read more here:
https://www.tapinto.net/towns/milltown-slash-spotswood/articles/rutgers-seminar-focuses-on-equine-gastrointestina-15

Friday, February 09, 2018

Australia: Rare horse calls Southern Downs home

Warwickdailynews.com.au - Full Artice

9 February 2017
by Marian Faa

AMANDA Watson has been around horses her whole life but when she met Chester the 'curly', she knew she'd struck a rare find.

Looking at Chester, you might think someone had taken a crimping iron to his mane and perming product to his coat, but the fact is his wavy locks are completely natural.

The unusual breed originated in North America from a genetic quirk that developed in appaloosas and quarter horses over the years.

Chester is a one of only 100 curly horses in Australia and 5000 in the world, but he now calls Amiens, just outside of Stanthorpe his new home.

The two-year old chestnut gelding stumbled into Ms Watson's arms on Australia Day when she went travelled to Orange to meet one of two curly horse breeders in Australia on the recommendation of a friend...

Read more here:
https://www.warwickdailynews.com.au/news/rare-horse-calls-southern-downs-home/3330950/

Saturday, February 03, 2018

Equi-Force to Participate in a Free Live Webinar: Health Gut, Healthy Horse

January 30 2018

Lexington, KY (January 30, 2018) –Until recently, the importance of equine gastrointestinal health has been both undervalued and misunderstood. Join Dr. Amy Gill, Equi-Force founder, for a free educational webinar “Healthy Gut, Healthy Horse” on Tuesday, February 13, 2018.

Factors such as physical and psychological stress, an unbalanced diet, antibiotics, and an oversupply of starches and sugars can result in inflammation and erosion in the horse’s gut wall. This inflammation and erosion allows bacteria and toxins to escape the intestinal lining and enter through to the horse’s circulatory system. Bacteria and other metabolites/toxins in the bloodstream can lead to a variety of disorders that will negatively affect the short- and long-term health of the horse.

During the webinar, Dr. Gill will discuss the most advanced techniques available to help combat digestive dysfunction in horses and how using nutrition therapeutically can provide the horse with the raw materials it needs to prevent and correct gastrointestinal disorders and disease.

This webinar is FREE and can be attended via your phone or computer. However, you must register to attend.

Reserve your spot at https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/5577659048822308865.

Date: February 13, 2018
Time: 4.30 Pacific, 6:30 Central, 7:30 Eastern
Place: On your computer or phone
Speakers: Dr. Amy Gill

About Equi-Force

In 2006, Dr. Gill developed a proprietary line of targeted nutrient therapies called EQUI-FORCE™ Equine Products, LLC. These products were formulated with the goal of helping to alleviate clinical symptoms associated with developmental orthopedic disorders, assist in the repair of damaged or abnormal bone and soft tissue, correct metabolic imbalances, improve tolerance to exercise and prevent muscle myopathies in the performance horse.

For further information on EQUI-FORCE products, please visit www.equiforce.com. You can also follow EQUI-FORCE at www.facebook.com/EquiForceEquineProducts/.

Friday, February 02, 2018

Feeding the Ulcer-Prone Horse

Thehorse.com - Full Article

By Kristen M. Janicki, MS, PAS
Jan 14, 2018

How to craft a diet for the horse with painful lesions in his stomach


Which horses would you traditionally consider “ulcer-prone”? Racehorses in training? Western pleasure horses showing competitively on the American Quarter Horse Association circuit? Pony Clubbers’ games ponies? Injured horses on stall rest? Truth is, you could be right with any one of these.

Equine gastric ulcer syndrome (EGUS) can plague any age, breed, or sex, and the risk factors are many—certain types of training and exercise, nutrition, feeding practices, and stabling, to name a few. Let’s take a look at one very important aspect of preventing and managing ulcers: diet.
The Facts and Stats

The Equine Gastric Ulcer Council defines EGUS as a disease complex associated with ulceration of the esophageal, gastric, or duodenal mucosa. Clinical signs can include a reduced or poor appetite, weight loss, a dull skin and hair coat, attitude or behavior changes, impaired performance, reluctance to work, and colic. Researchers have yet to determine a very reliable detection method for ulcers via blood and fecal markers. Therefore, veterinarian-performed gastroscopy (viewing the horse’s stomach using a flexible lighted instrument passed through his nostril) is the only accurate diagnostic test.

The council estimates that 30-50% of all foals and more than 50% of symptomatic ones have ulcers, and about 90% of symptomatic mature horses (older than 2) have ulcers. In the absence of any outward signs, about half of all mature horses have ulcers...

Read more here:
http://www.thehorse.com/articles/38693/feeding-the-ulcer-prone-horse?utm_source=Newsletter&utm_medium=nutrition&utm_campaign=01-15-2018

Thursday, February 01, 2018

Contact Your Representative to Suspend the ELD Mandate

AQHA.org

The American Quarter Horse Association requests a one-year enforcement delay to the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA) electronic logging device (ELD) mandate.

January 26, 2018
American Quarter Horse Association

The American Quarter Horse Association is involved with requests to delay the impending Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA) electronic logging device (ELD) mandate for one year. The mandate went into effect on December 18, 2017. At that time, livestock haulers were granted a 90-day waiver to comply with the mandate, and that waiver will expire March 18, 2018.

The rule limits the amount of time a commercial truck driver can drive and mandates a specific amount of off-duty/non-driving time, and requires the use of electronic logging devices to track the driving and non-driving times.

While there are some exemptions from the ELD mandate for farm and agricultural hauling, many of the rigs used for hauling horses and the activities horse owners participate in may not be exempt.

AQHA and other livestock organizations are concerned about the regulation requiring 10 consecutive hours off duty and how that will affect the welfare of animals being transported. Livestock industry guidelines recommend that drivers avoid stops when hauling livestock, as stopping for long periods of time would have a detrimental effect on the animals being hauled.

AQHA Executive Vice President Craig Huffhines commented on the National Pork Producer Council’s request to United State Department of Transportation for a waiver and exemption from the ELD mandate for livestock haulers. AQHA supports the exemption and is pursuing a one-year delay to address the additional issues created by changes to 49 CFR Part 395.

“AQHA members are involved in showing, racing, ranching, rodeos and recreation, and it is common for AQHA members to haul their horses interstate over long distances (much like other livestock haulers),” Huffhines said in his letter to the DOT. “We encourage the Department of Transportation to grant a one-year enforcement delay followed by a waiver and limited exemptions from compliance with the December 18, 2017, implementation date for the final rule on ELDs and hours of service. This will allow the department the opportunity to take appropriate steps to alleviate any unintended consequences that this mandate may have on the hauling of horses or other livestock.”

More at:
https://www.aqha.com/news/2018/january/01262018-please-contact-your-representative-to-suspend-the-eld-mandate/

Sunday, January 28, 2018

These Idaho Women Followed Salmon Migration on Horseback

Outsideonline.com - Full Article and photos

This spring, Kat Cannell, MJ Wright, and Katelyn Spradley set out on horseback to follow a salmon’s upstream battle from the mouth of the Columbia River to central Idaho’s Redfish Lake. The young trio, who all grew up on horses and now work and guide in the outdoors, planned the 900-plus-mile trip to learn about the waterways, animals, and stakeholders involved in a salmon’s journey to spawn.

After riding across public land, along highways, and through the city streets of Portland, the team and their seven horses arrived at Redfish Lake on June 9. Here, photographer John Webster, who followed the women for much of the time, shares a few images from their ride...

See photos by John Webster:
https://www.outsideonline.com/2198361/these-women-followed-salmon-migration-horseback

When Endurance Horses Colic: What Vets Need to Know

Thehorse.com - Full Article

By Michelle N. Anderson, TheHorse.com Digital Managing Editor
Jan 28, 2018

Competitive endurance riding challenges a horse’s athletic ability, stamina, and conditioning over rugged routes ranging from 50 to 100 miles. Because of the sport’s strenuous nature, endurance horses are at risk for colic due to dehydration, fatigue, and metabolic disorders.

Colic prevention, early intervention, and proper management during competition can mean the difference between life and death for endurance horses, said Yvette Nout-Lomas, DVM, PhD, Dipl. ACVIM, ACECC, assistant professor of equine internal medicine at Colorado State University’s Veterinary Teaching Hospital.

Nout-Lomas presented the paper “How to Treat Endurance Sport Horses With Colic at Competitions” at the 2017 American Association of Equine Practitioners Convention, held Nov. 17-21 in San Antonio, Texas. American Endurance Ride Conference (AERC, the U.S. governing body for endurance) veterinary chair Jeanette Mero, DVM, of Mariposa Equine Services, in California, co-authored the study, in which they reviewed AERC data, including recorded equine fatalities related to endurance competition...

Read more here:
http://www.thehorse.com/articles/40183/when-endurance-horses-colic-what-vets-need-to-know

Saturday, January 27, 2018

Take the AHP Equine Industry Survey

January 27 2018

Horse owners who live in the United States, are 18 years of age and older, and who currently own or manage at least one horse are invited to complete American Horse Publications' survey by April 1, 2018.

The survey, which is hosted every three years, will gauge participation trends and management practices in the U.S. equine industry, identify critical issues facing the equine industry as perceived by those who own or manage horses, and better understand issues pertaining to horse health.

The online survey is made possible by a sponsorship from Zoetis, the leading animal health company dedicated to improving equine wellness, every day. Zoetis has sponsored the survey since its inception in 2009.

http://www.ahphorsesurvey.com/

Wild horses aren’t overrunning the West

HCN.org - Full Article

A Trump administration proposal sets wild horse populations at extinction levels.


Ellie Phipps Price
Opinion
Jan. 26, 2018

Most Americans want to preserve wild horses on the Western range. Their independence and unbridled freedom symbolize the qualities that make our country great. But their future in 10 Western states is in jeopardy, thanks to a Trump administration proposal to reduce wild populations to extinction levels by killing as many as 90,000 of these iconic animals.

According to a recent poll, it’s a plan that 80 percent of Americans, including 86 percent of Trump voters and 77 percent of Clinton voters, oppose. But will Congress listen? Congress must reconcile the differences in spending legislation created by the Interior Department. The Senate version prohibits killing and slaughter; the House version allows it...

Read more here:
http://www.hcn.org/articles/opinion-wild-horses-arent-overrunning-the-west

Thursday, January 25, 2018

AHC’s 1st Quarter Webinar to Discuss ELD Mandate


Horsecouncil.org

January 25, 2018

(Washington, DC)- The American Horse Council (AHC) will host its 1st Quarter 2018 webinar on Monday, February 12th at 3:00 pm ET and will address the recent Electronic Logging Device (ELD) Mandate that has caused much confusion and a lot of questions throughout the equine industry.

“We have been getting quite a few phone calls and emails with questions about the ELD Mandate and how it is going to not only affect the industry, but individuals as well,” said AHC President, Julie Broadway. “We hope that holding a webinar addressing the mandate would be a compliment to the brochures we have already put together on this issue.”

The webinar will address the details of what the ELD Mandate includes, and who is required to have an electronic logging device. We will also discuss requirements for Commercial Driver’s License (CDL), as well as what the AHC is doing to mitigate the effects of the proposed changes on the equine industry.

Both AHC members and non-members are encouraged to attend the webinar. The webinar will also be recorded and posted on the AHC website for those that could not attend. Please register online here, and you will receive an email with login instructions two days before the webinar date.

Tuesday, January 23, 2018

Advanced Equine Comfort Launches Easy’s Performance Slipper™

Advancedeqinecomfort.com

January 23 2018

New glue-on shoe to provide performance benefits to sport horses

Highlands, NC – Jan. 23, 2018 – Advanced Equine Comfort LLC today announced the launch of its newest glue-on horseshoe, Easy’s Performance Slipper™. No longer solely for therapeutic relief, Easy’s Performance Slipper is a more streamlined model of the original Easy’s Slipper®, providing the same patented hoof support, but with a newly contoured shape for peak performance in all types of riding disciplines.

Based on customer and farrier feedback, changes were made to the original Easy’s Slipper, including:

• Material was removed from the sides to reduce leverage
• The cuff was thinned to provide more flexibility for ease of installation
• Material was added to widen the sole surface at the toe to provide support for horses with less than well-connected growth at the toe
• The back bar was increased in size to provide additional support to the heel
• Vertical ribs were added to the inside of the cuff to provide space for equal dispersion of glue, as well as serving to keep any break in the glue bond from spreading
• Cut marks were made to the rear of the cuff to offer guidance to nipper the cuff in the event the cuff is too tight at the heels

The material of Easy’s Performance Slipper remains the same thickness on the sole of the slipper to continue to provide the best shock absorption and shock vibration dissipation of any boot or glue-on presently on the market. The Easy’s Performance Slipper patent is pending the U.S., U.K. and 28 European communities. It is offered in all three original Easy’s Slipper styles, including the open bottom rocker, closed bottom rocker and heart bar.

“We’ve listened to our customers from across the world, and the demand is for a sporty glue-on so that competition and riding horses can have all the benefits from a therapy shoe, along with superior riding performance,” said Sue Blair, founder and CEO, Advanced Equine Comfort. “We expect Easy’s Performance Slipper to gain mass appeal and be a real game-changer for the horseshoe industry.”

The original Easy’s Slipper is still available, and continues to be the leading therapeutic glue-on horseshoe that provides shock absorption and vibration dissipation to improve joint and bone health. It is both FEI and USEF approved for competition.

###

About Easy’s Slipper®

Easy’s Slipper, from Advanced Equine Comfort LLC, is the therapeutic glue-on horseshoe that provides shock absorption and vibration dissipation to improve joint and bone health. Easy’s Slipper encourages hoof growth and physical movement to grow healthier hooves and happier horses. The superior shock absorbency decreases stress on the bones, ligaments and joints, allowing natural flexing of the hoof, resulting in enhanced blood flow and increased oxygenation of the horse’s body. The built-in rocker can be easily adjusted by a farrier for the desired breakover for proper movement and soundness.

Visit www.advancedequinecomfort.com to learn more, and like us on Facebook at facebook.com/easysslipper

Friday, January 19, 2018

Is Sugar Beet Pulp Too High in Sugar for Horses?

Thehorse.com - Full Article

By Clair Thunes, PhD
Jan 15, 2018

Q. Last week in your article about helping horses stay warm in winter you mentioned feeding sugar beet pulp to horses in need of extra calories from a forage source. It doesn’t seem like that would be a good choice for a lot of horses. Isn’t sugar beet pulp high in sugar?

A. The name certainly implies that this common equine feed ingredient is high in sugar. However, you might be surprised to learn that by the time it makes it to your horse’s feed bucket sugar beet pulp, in most cases, is actually very low in sugar.

Sugar beets are a root crop with a high concentration of sucrose sugar (think table sugar) grown commercially for sugar production. According to the American Sugarbeet Growers Association, sugar beets are grown in many Western and Northern states. The sugar beet is about a foot long and weighs between 2 to 5 pounds. With a sucrose content of about 18%, sugar beets make up a little over 50% of the domestically produced sugar.

However, we’re not feeding horses whole beets. Rather we feed what‘s left after manufacturers have extracted sugar for human use. What’s left is referred to sugar beet pulp and is a source of fermentable fibrous material that requires microbial fermentation in the horse’s hindgut. Sugar beet pulp is used extensively in livestock feed and, for horses, is sold as an ingredient in commercial feeds or separately as shreds or pellets...

Read more here:
http://www.thehorse.com/articles/40143/is-sugar-beet-pulp-too-high-in-sugar-for-horses?utm_source=Newsletter&utm_medium=reader-favorites&utm_campaign=01-19-2018

The Arabians who conquered Scottsdale

US.Blastingnews.com - Full Article

These sleek desert horses have become big business in the American Southwest.


B. Williams Author (Curated by J. Strawberry)

Arabians have conquered Scottsdale, Arizona with love and affection - not the warring Bedouin tribes from the Arabian Peninsula [VIDEO] thousands of years ago, but rather the 1,000-pound, four-hoof Arabians. They yearn to be stroked and scratched, and the signature neck - missing one vertebra - loves to have a human arm around it. If you blow in their nostrils they will follow you anywhere.

“Arabian horses create a bond with their owners and caretakers that is unlike any other breed,” Gary McDonald told me after touring his Arabian farm in Scottsdale. “They are the most intelligent of the breeds and the intelligence makes them interactive, playful and easy to be trained.”

In 1954, Ed Tweed and 20 other breeders formed the #Arabian Horse Association of Arizona, with Ed as its first president, but America’s interest in the horses goes further back in history than that...

Read more here:
http://us.blastingnews.com/business/2018/01/the-arabians-who-conquered-scottsdale-002288341.html

Tuesday, January 16, 2018

Will the new laws for hauling horses affect you?



HorseCouncil.org

Is your truck/trailer a CMV (Commercial Motor Vehicle)?
Do you need a CDL (Commercial Drivers License) to haul your horses?
If so, you will need an ELD (Electronic Logging Device).

Electronic Logging Device (ELD) Mandate & Commercial Driver’s License (CDL) Requirements:


In an effort to help provide clarity to the ELD Mandate that was previously set to go into effect December 18, 2017- the AHC has put together two brochures to help provide insight into this already complex issue.

To see the ELD Mandate brochure and the CDL brochure, see this page:
http://www.horsecouncil.org/eld-mandate-cdl-requirements/

Monday, January 15, 2018

Why is the Frog of My Horse's Foot Falling Off?

Thehorse.com - Full Article

By Britt Conklin, DVM
Jan 3, 2018

Q. After a recent ride, I picked up my horse's hoof and found that the frog was hanging off. I've included a photograph I took of it. Why is my horse's frog falling off, and what should I do about it? Is he okay?

Via e-mail

A. The picture reflects a normal process in the horse's foot called exfoliation. Many people understand exfoliation in terms of human skin cells whereby dead cells are chemically or mechanically removed to improve the aesthetic look of the skin. The horse's sole and frog are similar in their cellular makeup to skin and therefore undergo a process whereby older cells "shed" over time...

Read more here:
http://www.thehorse.com/articles/34438/why-is-the-frog-of-my-horses-foot-falling-off?utm_source=Newsletter&utm_medium=lameness&utm_campaign=01-03-2018

Today, I sent an email to the AERC BoD …

EnduranceIntrospection.com - Full Article

by Patti Stedman | Jan 12, 2018 | Patti's Blog |

[If you are an AERC member and would like to voice an opinion on this topic, here’s a link to email your BoD members. Please note that most of them do not read or participate on Facebook, so while such discussions may be gratifying and allow you to vent your spleen or defend yourself, this is probably the more effective means of communicating your views as a member. https://aerc.org/static/Membership_Bod_Board.aspx ]

Good morning AERC BoD and members, USEF and FEI representatives.

I know a great many of you, and I know how difficult it can be to navigate the turbulent waters of the AERC BoD or Committee Chair role. I served on the BoD for one term, and also served for a long time as Chair of the Ride Managers’ Committee. So first off, thank you for your service to the organization and the sport I know we all love.

I’ve learned that the amount of time spent on Facebook and my mental health are inversely proportional.

The divisiveness of the discussions re: AERC’s relationship with Region VII and FEI and USEF are savage. I know that many of you do not participate on Facebook (see above; I understand why not) but there is a reality that we need to face. Whether or not the USEF/FEI/Region 7 issue itself affects our organization and the outside perception of it, the social media fights certainly do. We are not putting our best face forward and I think we’ve all realized how critical Facebook has been to AERC’s growth/new member recruiting over the past 8-10 years...

Read more here:
http://enduranceintrospection.com/wp/today-i-sent-an-email-to-the-aerc-bod/

Thursday, January 11, 2018

Forage-Only Diet a 'Win' for Standardbred Racehorses

Thehorse.com - Full Article

By Christa Lesté-Lasserre, MA
Jul 28, 2017

Horses in few disciplines require as much high-energy nutrition as racehorses. So it’s no surprise that, traditionally, a large part of a racehorse’s food ration is energy-dense concentrated feeds. But concentrates are hard on the equine stomach, contribute to gastric ulcers, and lack the bulk and fiber content that keep a horse’s gut healthy.

In an ideal world, horses—even racehorses—would thrive off forage alone. But given their intense training programs, could that ever be possible? Swedish researchers say yes, not only is it possible but it can also be beneficial...

Read more here:
http://www.thehorse.com/articles/39477/forage-only-diet-a-win-for-standardbred-racehorses

Friday, January 05, 2018

Cold Weather Laminitis?

HorseNetwork.com - Full Article

December 30 2017
ELEANOR KELLON, VMD

It happens every winter. A horse that may not even have a prior history of laminitis is found to be very lame and reluctant to move. It’s more than the typical hesitation horses show on hard, frozen ground. Looks like laminitis but the feet aren’t hot. What’s going on?

Cold-induced hoof pain strikes horses with insulin resistance. IR is a well described risk factor for laminitis and even when the horse is not glaringly lame it is causing damage to the laminae. We haven’t uncovered all the mechanisms behind laminar damage from high insulin levels but one known factor is elevated levels of endothelin-1.

Endothelin-1 is a peptide (small protein) produced by the cells lining the interior of blood vessels. It is the most potent vasoconstrictor known and is normally balanced by production of the vasodilating chemical nitric oxide. Cold-induced reduction in blood supply to the hoof when superimposed on the pre-existing high endothelin-1 activity may explain why some IR horses develop hoof pain in cold weather but normal horses do not...

Read more here:
https://horsenetwork.com/2017/12/cold-weather-laminitis/?utm_source=MASTER&utm_campaign=a7db6e30de-HNS_2018_1_5&utm_medium=email&utm_term=0_5694ca6b0c-a7db6e30de-84641243&mc_cid=a7db6e30de&mc_eid=b3c9897994

Thursday, January 04, 2018

Should I Feed Alfalfa Between Endurance Races?

Equinews.com - Full Article

Q:
I manage endurance horses. I have experience using alfalfa during races, but I have been told to not use it between races, when I’m training, as it could cause metabolic problems. Can you please tell me your thoughts?

A:
Many performance horses benefit from alfalfa. The forage can be used successfully in endurance horses with some precautions.

At a competition, there is no better forage for endurance horses because of its palatability, high calorie content, and nutrient profile. However, it is not usually fed to endurance horses as the only forage on a day-to-day basis.

The concern with feeding alfalfa daily is thought to lie in its high calcium content. The mechanism is not completely understood, but researchers believe that daily high calcium intake may affect the body's ability to mobilize calcium during times of accelerated need, such as those associated with long-distance competition...

Read more here:
http://www.equinews.com/answer-exchange/alfalfa-and-endurance-horses?platform=hootsuite