Saturday, April 20, 2019

Hoof Boots Market with Current Trends, 2018-2028

NewsFinancialAnalyst.com - full article

April 19, 2019 James

Market Overview:

Professionals who practice horse riding feel that hoof boots are excellent substitutes to the earlier used horseshoes. Hoof boots are often used as a backup either when the farrier is unavailable or in case of a thrown horseshoe or as hoof protection for a barefoot horse. The popularity of hoof boots is increasing in all disciplines of horse riding, particularly in endurance riding and trail riding. With the increasing demand, hoof boots are now available for every kind of horse playing any discipline of horse riding. Hoof boots are extremely necessary for horses that have recently been inducted into the sport, to protect their hoof from getting damaged in the uncomfortable terrains. Additionally, in some hoof boots, equine hoof pads are provided to ensure more comfort and additional support...

Full report at:
https://newsfinancialanalyst.com/hoof-boots-market-with-current-trends-analysis-2018-2028/

Friday, April 19, 2019

Adversity is a Catalyst for Change

Thriveglobal.com - Full Article

By Charisse Glenn, Casting Director, Equestrian and Creator of The Let Go
April 18 2019

Adversity is a part of life. Some of us have more of it than others yet, we all experience it. The manner in which it comes into our lives is as diverse as the adversity itself. Finding ways to be resilient in the face of life’s’ challenges is a measure of who we are.

Conflict is challenging for me. I am not a good fighter. However, when faced with adversity the warrior woman in me surfaces.

Like all of us, I have navigated family, relationship, career, and financial hardships. Yet, much of the adversity in my life has come in the form of natural disasters. Living in California, fires, floods, and earthquakes are a matter of course.

I was forced, however, to face my own mortality while competing in a 100-mile endurance horse race, in the Australia Outback. Caught in the worst storm in 100 years, lightning struck inches from my body and that of the horse I was on.

So loud it became silent, so bright, I was blinded. Time stood still. The world stopped. I could not make a move, whether it was physically possible or not, I was paralyzed as the lightning struck three times…caging us within its fury. When my senses returned, survival mode kicked in and all I could think about was, I am alive…get off of the mountain.

What doesn’t kill us makes us stronger. And we carry on. And that’s what I did...

Read more here:
https://thriveglobal.com/stories/adversity-is-a-catalyst-for-change/

Thursday, April 18, 2019

How Veterinarians, Students, and Volunteers Saved Horses During a Deadly Wildfire

Thehorse.com - Full Article

Last fall, Hayley Dieckmann and the UC Davis Veterinary Emergency Response Team treated horses and other animals displaced by the Camp Fire. Here’s a look at what she experienced.


Posted by Hayley Dieckmann | Jan 31, 2019

Late last year, Northern California experienced the largest and deadliest wildfire in recent history. Butte County was on fire for 17 days. The Camp Fire killed at least 85 people and changed the lives of thousands more.

Countless more animals—including horses—were injured, traumatized, displaced, or killed by the fire. Those that survived needed care, even if their owners had evacuated the area. That’s where we came in.

During the Fire
Rescue workers, owners, and good Samaritans brought horses and livestock to the Butte County Fairgrounds for shelter and veterinary care. During the peak of the fire, the Butte County large animal shelter housed more than 700 evacuated animals, from horses to chickens to every livestock animal between...

Read more here:
https://thehorse.com/165984/how-veterinarians-students-and-volunteers-saved-horses-during-a-deadly-wildfire/

Why Are My Horse’s Hooves Growing So Fast?

Thehorse.com - Full Article

Why does a horse’s hooves grow faster than his stablemates’ who are on the same diet and exercise schedule? A veterinarian who’s also a farrier shares his thoughts.

Posted by Scott Fleming, DVM, CF | Mar 27, 2019

Q. I keep my Western pleasure horse’s front feet shod year-round so he can stay in work during the winter and to keep his hooves in decent shape; otherwise they tend to flare and crack. During our main riding season (March-late October), he’s on a six-week trim and reset schedule. But during the winter, when all our other horses’ hoof growth slows, his doesn’t—the farrier jokes that he could be trimmed every three weeks. What could be causing his hooves to grow so fast, and why would it be different from the other horses? They’re all on the same diet, exercise schedules, etc., they just have different genetics...

Read more here:
https://thehorse.com/168955/why-are-my-horses-hooves-growing-so-fast/

Liquid blood taken from 42,000-year-old frozen horse that scientists hope to clone

Foxnews.com - Full Article

By Ann W. Schmidt | Fox News
April 17 2019

Scientists were able to extract liquid blood from the heart of a 42,000-year-old foal that had been frozen and preserved in permafrost in Siberia.

The scientists are hoping to clone the prehistoric horse — which was discovered in the Siberian region of Yakutia last summer — and bring it back to life, according to The Siberian Times.

“We can now claim that this is the best-preserved Ice Age animal ever found in the world,” Semyon Grigoryev, the head of the Mammoth Museum in the regional capital of Yakutsk, told the outlet.

The foal, which is believed to be from the extinct species Equus lenensis, or Lena horse, was discovered with its skin, hair, hooves and tail all preserved. The foal was believed to be just weeks old when it likely drowned in the mud which later froze and turned to permafrost...

Read more here:
https://www.foxnews.com/science/liquid-blood-frozen-horse-clone

Sunday, April 07, 2019

Horse Gut Sounds and What They Mean

KPPUSA.com - Full Article

One way to determine if your horse is normal and healthy is to evaluate the rumblings of his gut. The technical term for a gut sound is a borborygmus (pronounced bôr′bə-rĭg′məs). The plural is borborygmi. During a physical exam a veterinarian will listen to your horse’s gut sounds with a stethoscope in the flank area to determine if normal borborygmi are present. When listening for gut sounds, both sides of the horse are evaluated and the abdomen is divided into four areas or quadrants. A healthy horse will have consistent and active rumblings in each of the four quadrants. Each area should be evaluated for at least one minute. As a general rule, it is normal to hear 1 to 3 borborygmi in a 60-second period. If less than 1 borborygmus is heard per minute then that portion of the gut is noted as hypomotile (not enough movement). If more than 3 borborygmi are heard per minute the area is noted as hypermotile (too much movement). Of course, there are variations depending on the individual horse and when he or she last ate.

Typically when a horse presents with impending enterocolitis, which often results in diarrhea, he will have a hypermotile gut with increased liquid and gas sounds. Hypermotility can be present in the early stages of obstructive disease. Hypomotility, however, is the sign of a poor gut movement and an absence of gut sounds may indicate the presence of an obstruction...

Read more here:
http://kppusa.com/2015/07/02/horse-gut-sounds/

Solar Power System for Horse Trailers

Trailmeister.com - Full Article

March 29 2019
by Robert Eversole

My Solar Power System for Horse Trailers

As Published in the April 2019 issue of Horsemen’s Corral

When we started planning the Trailer Project one of the very first things that we looked into was a solar power system. The majority of places that we camp and those areas that are still on the bucket list, don’t have electric hookups. I wanted to avoid noisy generators and hauling the fuel for said noisy generators.

A solar power system works from dawn to dusk, silently, odor free, without fuel, no matter where you are or what you are doing. Rolling down the road, parked at the gas station, or camping, the batteries are being charged.

Horse Trailer Solar Power System

They start charging before you feed the horses, keep charging while you ride, and continue all day. They don’t quit until nightfall. You never have to think about the batteries being charged. It just happens. Like magic.

I don’t know about you, but I think electrical terms can be confusing. Amp, watts, and Oh My! Here’s an easier way to think about solar electrical systems for our horse trailers...

Read more here:
https://www.trailmeister.com/solar-power-system-horse-trailers/

Thursday, April 04, 2019

10 Tips for Traveling Solo With Your Horse

USRider.org - Full Article

A few simple measures can help you head off trouble and give you peace of mind.


By Hope Ellis-Ashburn | 4/1/2019

For years, I’ve enjoyed attending trail rides, horse shows and clinics with a group of like-minded friends. We’ve developed a “mobile buddy system,” helping each other out, cheering each other on and just being there to offer support when needed. I long ago became accustomed to having a friend assist me with parking my trailer, loading and unloading my horse, settling in at horse shows and generally lending a hand by sharing supplies and providing moral support when I have show-ring jitters.

Then a day I dreaded finally arrived: A show I had looked forward to for several months was on the calendar and no one in my group of friends would be able to go.

I briefly considered calling the whole thing off and waiting until the next event when at least one member of our group could go with me. But I had worked hard to prepare for this show, and I wasn’t ready to simply scratch it from my schedule. As I considered my options, I realized that I knew plenty of riders who routinely trailered their horses to shows, trail outings and other destinations on their own. Why couldn’t I? After all, I wasn’t a complete novice at shipping or showing, and I knew I could put to use the collective wisdom I had accumulated over the years of traveling with my friends. So, after careful consideration, I decided that I was ready to go it alone.

I signed up for the show, trailered my mare there and had a wonderful time. In fact, the next time I’m faced with the need to go it alone, I won’t hesitate. Still, even for veteran travelers, the prospect of trailering your horse on your own can sometimes be daunting, and it’s easy to lose track of basic trip-planning imperatives, amid all the usual horse show preparations. So, I’ve compiled a list of a few measures that gave me peace of mind on my first solo outing and that I still mentally review each time I’m traveling with my horse alone...

Read more here

The Jockey Club Repeats its Call for Major Reform

Bloodhorse.com - Full Article

Statement: Horse fatalities are a nationwide problem that need to be addressed.

The Jockey Club Press Release
Release Date: April 1, 2019

The Jockey Club again emphasized the need for extensive reforms in an April 1 released that followed the catastrophic breakdown of a horse racing March 31 at Santa Anita Park.

A 23rd horse died at Santa Anita Park only three days after racing resumed; it is the 23rd horse fatality in the past three months.

The string of deaths at Santa Anita isn't the first spike in fatalities at a U.S. racetrack—these tragic events have happened before at other tracks and they will continue to occur without significant reform to the horse racing industry. The issue isn't about a single track; horse fatalities are a nationwide problem that need to be addressed on an industrywide basis.

The Jockey Club Calls for Extensive Reforms

There has been tremendous focus on the track surface, but the core of the problem lies in a fundamentally flawed system that falls far short of international horse racing standards -- standards that better protect horses and result in far fewer injuries and deaths.

Chief among the principles that make up the standards of the International Federation of Horseracing Authorities (IFHA) are those guiding the development of an effective anti-doping program and the regulation of the use of performance-enhancing drugs and drugs that can mask injuries, both of which can result in injuries and deaths...

Read more here:
https://www.bloodhorse.com/horse-racing/articles/232862/the-jockey-club-repeats-its-call-for-major-reform

Wednesday, April 03, 2019

France bans the trimming of horse whiskers

VetPracticeMag.com.au - Full Article

March 28 2019
by Editor

The French Equestrian Federation (FFE) has banned the removal of a horse’s whiskers on welfare grounds. It joins Germany and Switzerland in bringing into effect a rule that would disqualify any horse from competition if the whiskers have been removed.

On their website they state that vibrissae, the correct term for whiskers— which are the long tactile hairs around the eye, nose and mouth of the horse—are sensory organs. And just like cat’s whiskers, they allow the horse to gather information about the environment. Around the eyes they serve as protection and, around the blind spot of the nose, they take over from the eyes.

The FFE has just incorporated a rule on this subject in their General Competition Regulations and, from early 2019, competing on a horse that has been deprived of his/her vibrissae is no longer permitted...

Read more here:
https://vetpracticemag.com.au/france-bans-the-trimming-of-horse-whiskers/?fbclid=IwAR2FL97dNhW1bShFPbkqTQENQqGufbUW8vvehh31jcgT-xQcHLey_1T-LfE

Tuesday, April 02, 2019

The most violent group of people who ever lived: Horse-riding Yamnaya tribe

DailyMail.co.uk - Full Article

The most violent group of people who ever lived: Horse-riding Yamnaya tribe who used their huge height and muscular build to brutally murder and invade their way across Europe than 4,000 years ago

• Yamnaya people dominated Europe from between 5,000 and 4,000 years ago
• They had nutritionally rich diets and were tall, muscular and skilled horse riders
• It is believed they exploited a continent recovering from disease and death
• They spread rapidly, adapting and massacring their way throughout Europe
• Slaughtered Neolithic men in prehistoric genocide to ensure their DNA survived
• They made their way to Britain and within a few generations there was no remains of the previous inhabitants who built Stonehenge in the genetic record

By Joe Pinkstone For Mailonline
Published: 15:49 EDT, 29 March 2019 | Updated: 03:10 EDT, 1 April 2019

A brutish tribe of people who lived in the Neolithic era more than 4,000 years ago is being touted as the most violent and aggressive society to ever live.

A growing body of evidence is convincing archaeologists that the Yamnaya society ruthlessly massacred opposing societies.

It is believed the primitive society capitalised on disease, warfare and famine and unceremoniously swept through Europe, destroying entire civilisations and leaving destruction in their wake.

DNA evidence from several prehistoric burial sites has revealed hoards of these tall, muscular and violent warriors would overwhelm other societies on horseback.

They would murder men and sire their own children so that within a few generations the presence of the previous societies is all but eradicated...

Read more here:
https://www.dailymail.co.uk/sciencetech/article-6865741/The-violent-group-people-lived.html?ito=rss-flipboard


Sunday, March 24, 2019

Trailer Insulation

Trailmeister.com - Full Article

by Robert Eversole
February 7 2019

Trailer Insulation is one of the first steps in any DIY build, and it’s also one of the most misunderstood. There’s a lot of misconceptions about trailer insulation, and people end up wasting money and time on unnecessary steps and products.

When we were building our trailer we had all kinds of questions about insulation: What’s the best material to use? How do we install it? Do I need a vapor barrier? What questions do I not know enough to ask?

So what is the best way to insulate a DIY horse trailer? Below, we’ll go over how heat is transferred and how to stop it; discuss what you need to know about insulation, look at some of the different products available, and how best to use them.

There are three types of heat transfer: radiation, conduction, and convection...

Read more here:
https://www.trailmeister.com/trailer-insulation/

Friday, March 22, 2019

Endurance.net Adds New Blog: Books for Endurance Riders

March 22 2019

https://booksbyenduranceriders.blogspot.com/

Looking for books to read about endurance riding? Long distance riding? Conditioning? Endurance history? Adventure rides? We've got you covered.

You can build your own endurance library by browsing our list. "Books for Endurance Riders" can be found with our other blogs, by clicking on the "News, Stories" tab on www.endurance.net:

www.endurance.net/newsblogs/

Should My Horse Exercise on an Empty Stomach?

Riding before your horse gets fed could put him at risk for gastric ulcers. Find out why.

Posted by Clair Thunes, PhD | Mar 18, 2019

Q.I board my horse and ride in the morning and sometimes late afternoon, often before he gets fed. I am worried about the potential gastric ulcer risk of riding him on an empty stomach. Is there anything I can do to combat this?

—Via e-mail

A.You’re right to be concerned. Although historically it wasn’t the case, veterinarians now generally understand that horses should have some amount of food in their stomach, ideally, at all times...

Read more here:
https://thehorse.com/168300/should-my-horse-exercise-on-an-empty-stomach/

All IR/EMS Horses Have Laminitis

March 19, 2019

Eleanor M. Kellon, VMD

The Equine Cushing's and Insulin Resistance Group outreach forum (https://ecir.groups.io/g/main) has been in existence for almost 20 years and currently has over 11,000 international members. As you might expect, many members seek out the group when their horse/pony/mini/donkey/mule becomes obviously laminitic. Others report issues confirmed by blood work, but state they have never had problems with laminitis.

Unfortunately, they're wrong.

Back in 2004, Johnson, et al., published an article entitled Endocrinopathic Laminitis in the Horse. They described a "remodeling" of the laminae that occurs in horses with EMS or PPID (Cushing’s disease). Specifically, there is lengthening and thinning of the dermal lamellae that leads to weakening and predisposes to separation, with resultant white line widening, rotation, and sinking. This occurs without the basement membrane damage and white blood cell infiltration characteristic of other types of laminitis.

Of particular interest was the report that these changes are clearly visible microscopically, and on radiographs, in horses not showing any obvious signs of pain, inflammation or lameness.

Johnson focused on a possible role for cortisol in these changes, but more recent research has clearly shown that it is insulin elevation that is to blame. Exactly how this happens is still unclear. There is growing evidence that insulin may be acting through the IGF-1 (insulin-like growth factor) receptors to cause increased cellular proliferation.

There is some discrepancy in published studies regarding whether or not dermal and epidermal tissues in the lamellae express insulin receptors. If they do, high insulin may stimulate the changes seen via those receptors. In humans, epidermal keratinocytes stimulated with insulin show the same proliferation and elongation seen in the lamellae.

It has also been shown that endocrinopathic laminitis, like human metabolic syndrome, is characterized by increased levels of the potent vasoconstrictor endothelin-1, which may be causing cellular proliferation via endothelin receptors with reduction in perfusion and delivery of oxygen/glucose to the laminae. Positive responses to herbal and amino acid support for nitric oxide generation suggest this is part of the mechanism. Hypoxia (low oxygen tension) itself also causes migration and proliferation of keratinocytes via release of HIF-1 (hypoxia inducible factor). The imbalance between vasodilating nitric oxide and vasoconstricting endothelin-1 is directly caused by high insulin levels within the blood vessels.

Regardless of the exact mechanism, the important thing to realize is that these changes are occurring in every horse with elevated insulin, whether they are recognized to be in pain or not. Low-level lameness is easy to miss because the pain is symmetrical (no head bob). More subtle signs include less spontaneous activity, reluctance to make sharp turns, muscle tension in the forearms, back and hindquarters, more rigid head carriage (high or low), and a subdued attitude. These horses can easily be pushed over the edge into more severe pain by dietary indiscretions or even cold weather.

The good news is that meticulous attention to dietary simple carbohydrates, calories/weight, mineral balancing and additional nutritional support as needed is very successful in controlling insulin and restoring your horse's love of life.

If you suspect your horse has high insulin, get a diagnosis and take correct action. Don’t allow hoof damage to progress to the point of being crippling.


About ECIR Group Inc.

Started in 1999, the ECIR Group is the largest field-trial database for PPID and EMS in the world and provides the latest research, diagnosis, and treatment information, in addition to dietary recommendations for horses with these conditions. Even universities do not and cannot compile and follow long term as many in-depth case histories of PPID/EMS horses as the ECIR Group.

In 2013 the Equine Cushing's and Insulin Resistance Group Inc., an Arizona nonprofit corporation, was approved as a 501(c)3 public charity. Tax deductible contributions and grants support ongoing research, education, and awareness of Equine Cushing's Disease/PPID and EMS.

THE MISSION of the ECIR Group Inc. is to improve the welfare of equines with metabolic disorders via a unique interface between basic research and real-life clinical experience. Prevention of laminitis is the ultimate goal. The ECIR Group serves the scientific community, practicing clinicians, and owners by focusing on investigations most likely to quickly, immediately, and significantly benefit the welfare of the horse.

https://www.ecirhorse.org/video.php

Contact: Nancy Collins
603-323-7469
ecirgroup1@gmail.com

Thursday, March 21, 2019

Leg-bone density increases in response to Endurance training, study shows

Horsetalk.co.nz - Full Article

March 21, 2019
Horsetalk.co.nz

The thickness and density of the leg bones in endurance horses increase in response to training for the discipline, research shows.

Researchers in the Brazilian study investigated the cortical bone – the dense outer surface of bone that forms a protective layer around the internal cavity.

The aim of the study by Mariana Damazio Rajão and her colleagues was to understand the bone response to exercise adaptations in the hopes it might provide clues to reducing the occurrence of orthopedic injuries in Endurance horses...

Read more here:
https://www.horsetalk.co.nz/2019/03/21/leg-bone-density-endurance-training/

Wednesday, March 20, 2019

Arizona’s wild horse paradox

HCN.org - Full Article

Activists and agencies try to balance the West’s horse mythology against herd impacts.

December 13 2018
Debbie Weingarten

he horses stood chest-deep in the river, pulling up long strands of eelgrass with their teeth. There must have been 20 of them, in colors ranging from nearly white to ruddy brown. The babies stood wobbly in the current. My partner and I floated quietly past in our kayak, trying not to spook them. But it was a sweltering Friday in July, and we were followed by hollering college students in rented innertubes. Beer coolers floated along behind them, and music reverberated off the canyon walls. Uninterested and used to the party, the horses barely looked up.

A stone’s throw from metropolitan Phoenix, the Salt River runs through the Tonto National Forest, where deer, bighorn sheep and bald eagles live amid cactus and mesquite bosques. But the most famous and controversial inhabitants are the area’s “wild” horses. Once slated for removal by the U.S. Forest Service for reasons of public safety, today these horses are protected by state law. Now, in the first arrangement of its kind, a state government is working with a nonprofit to manage horses on federal land. Now long-feuding entities must work together to find a way to balance the horses — and the mythology of the American West they represent — with river and land conservation and public safety...

Read more here:
https://www.hcn.org/issues/51.5/wild-horses-arizonas-wild-horse-paradox

Delivering aid on horseback – a feel-good adventure through India

Telegraph.co.uk - Full Article

by Kat Brown
19 MARCH 2019

I’m riding through the tufted fields of Rajasthan’s Thar desert, marvelling at how it really does look more like I’m in West Wittering than halfway across the world, when the inquiry comes from our ride leader, Alexander Souri. “How do you all feel about a gallop?”

We eight Relief Riders – four Americans, four Britons – sit up a bit straighter. Oooh. A gallop would be lovely, thank you. The grin that has been plastered on my face since I landed in India five days earlier becomes even wider.

Our journey, book-ended by days in Delhi and Jaipur, is heading towards the celebrated horse and camel fair that is held in Pushkar each November, but for now I can’t imagine being anywhere else, because this is absolute heaven.

My horse, sensing her rider has stopped contributing to the ride, slams on the brakes to avoid us catapulting into a wall. As we slide into trot, I turn to see the group’s two beginners with their jolly, mustachioed ride leader, Ranveer Singh, cantering up behind us. A nice feature of Relief Riders is you can learn en route – and what a way to do it.

For 15 years, Alexander’s company Relief Riders has run humanitarian adventures in India, as well as in Turkey and Ecuador, combining a riding holiday with targeted aid that, to date, has helped more than 25,000 people, most of them children...

Read more here:
https://www.telegraph.co.uk/travel/destinations/asia/india/rajasthan/articles/horse-riding-holiday-india/

Saturday, March 16, 2019

Wild Horses Could Drag You Away – To The Bank. The Government Will Pay You $1,000 To Adopt One

NWPB.org - listen

By Amanda Peacher March 14, 2019

BY AMANDA PEACHER / BSPR
The Bureau of Land Management is offering people $1,000 if they’ll adopt a wild horse.

The agency says more than 80,000 wild horses and burros are on rangelands across the West right now. The animals can damage rangeland and when their populations are high some of them starve.

The BLM captures the animals and keeps them in corrals, but some of the less feral ones get adopted out.

Debbie Collins is a wild horse and burro national outreach specialist with BLM. She says the animals’ numbers are up, but adoptions are down. Most corrals are at capacity of about 6,000.

“So what’s happened is our numbers on the range have increased even more, so we’re at nearly 82,000 animals on our public lands,” says Collins...

Read more and listen:
https://www.nwpb.org/2019/03/14/wild-horses-could-drag-you-away-to-the-bank-the-government-will-pay-you-1000-to-adopt-one/?fbclid=IwAR3jbAcHe17thoqoKWIPJ1Y0To9Hkl01-rLPNEd6-DCyXBPNGWhES7Pi9fM

Wednesday, March 13, 2019

Book Shows How Love And Trust Between Horse And Human Can Overcome Almost Impossible Obstacles

PRWeb.com

Barbara Jagoda announces the release of ‘Magna Terra Smoky’

COLORADO SPRINGS, COLO. (PRWEB) MARCH 13, 2019

As long as she can remember, Barbara Jagoda has always had a tremendous love and passion for animals. Her admiration of and love for a two-year-old colt who captured her heart by beating all odds and becoming a record-breaking champion in the Arabian Racing World inspired Jagoda to write “Magna Terra Smoky” (published by Trafford Publishing).For more details about the book, please visit https://www.amazon.com/Magna-Terra-Smoky-Barbara-Jagoda/dp/1490791841

The book tells the incredible adventure of an unwanted, insecure two-year-old colt who, sadly is heading for the auction barn. Due to the impeccable timing of events, a human would enter his life and together, they would overcome his fears and injuries to become the “One Eyed Wonder” and a legend in the Arabian Racing World.

“This is truly a ‘Cinderella’ kind of a horse story to be enjoyed by everyone who loves animals. It shows readers how the love and trust that develop between a horse and a human can overcome almost impossible obstacles. There are heartbreak and sadness in the storyline as well as extreme highs and happy, exciting moments,” Jagoda says.

“Magna Terra Smoky” shows readers how it was very close for a talented and exceptional horse came to have his life ended at an auction barn. Smoky is a living proof of what a little luck, love, patience and determination can produce. “Horse racing has had some bad raps, but there is still a lot of good people in the sport who genuinely care for their horses,” Jagoda adds.

“Magna Terra Smoky”
By Barbara Jagoda
Hardcover | 6 x 9in | 332 pages | ISBN 9781490791852
Softcover | 6 x 9in | 332 pages | ISBN 9781490791845
E-Book | 332 pages | ISBN 9781490791869
Available at Amazon and Barnes & Noble

About the Author
Barbara Jagoda is a retired science schoolteacher and racehorse trainer who now works part time as a test administrator for a global company. During her university years, she enjoyed working as a wrangler at Cheley Camps, located near Estes Park, Colorado where she developed a fond rapport with her assigned horse, Pearl. Upon graduation and receiving her first paycheck as a new teacher, she immediately purchased Pearl as the first of her long string of equine companions. During the 1970s and 1980s, she went on to enjoy many years as a competitor in North American Trail Ride Conference (competitive trail riding) and later served as a judge for these events. Brandy (registered name of Sheiks Scimitar) was a favorite mount during these years and the two made a formidable team. In later years, she also competed in American Endurance Ride Conference (endurance riding) on another favorite horse, Roc-et Arapaho. Over the years, she has rescued and rehabilitated over a dozen horses either from auction houses or from homes where she discovered starving horses. She currently resides and enjoys living on a small ranch outside of Colorado Springs, Colorado where Magna Terra Smoky and a number of his friends enjoyed their lives after retirement from racing. Sadly, Smoky passed away in 2016, one day short of his 30th birthday. His best friend, Aurzel, and her latest rescue horse named Red currently enjoy the acreage and freedom this land provides.

Sunday, March 10, 2019

Infrared thermography could be of value in Endurance contests, say researchers

Horsetalk.co.nz - Full Article

March 10, 2019 Horsetalk.co.nz

Infrared thermography (IRT) may be a useful non-invasive tool to assess physiological stress in endurance horses, according to researchers, who suggest it could prove useful in helping vets decide whether horses are fit to continue.

Veronica Redaelli and her colleagues carried out a pilot study in Italy to see whether IRT could be used as a stress indicator in horses trained for the long-distance discipline.

Their findings were encouraging, prompting the study team to suggest that further studies should be conducted at vet checks during endurance competitions to learn whether eye temperature and the temperature at the crown of the head could help vets decide which animals were OK to continue.

Over the last 30 years, IRT has been widely used in veterinary medicine to detect injury, inflammatory responses, and causes of lameness, such as laminitis, in horses...

Read more here:
https://www.horsetalk.co.nz/2019/03/10/infrared-thermography-endurance-contests/

Saturday, March 09, 2019

Things You Should and Should Not Put on a Horse’s Wound

Thehorse.com - Full Article

Is the ointment you’re using on that cut helping or hurting? Remember these tips when treating horse wounds.

Posted by Alexandra Beckstett, The Horse Managing Editor | Feb 18, 2016

Horse owners and veterinarians have been treating equine wounds for centuries. After all, horses are unabashedly practiced at the art of sustaining wounds. Over the years we’ve tried many different wound ointments and salves, cleansers and dressings, but not all of them are backed by evidence of safety and/or efficacy.

So Dean Hendrickson, DVM, MS, Dipl. ACVS, professor of equine surgery at Colorado State University, in Fort Collins, went back to basics, describing effective and ineffective wound-cleaning agents to an audience of veterinarians at the 2015 Annual American Association of Equine Practitioners Convention, held Dec. 5-9, in Las Vegas.

Although our intentions are good, “most wound-cleaning agents and techniques will cause chemical or mechanical trauma to the wound bed,” he said. “Weigh the benefits of cleaning the wound against the trauma that agent will cause...”

Read more here:
https://thehorse.com/17070/things-you-should-and-should-not-put-on-a-horses-wound/?fbclid=IwAR1e-0Zehi349oQ9HsHM_LFKR4KDQQm4Xp3xuI7uszI7_DHYQPA4X7RGeSM

Thursday, March 07, 2019

War horses: Syria's Arabian beauties plod way to recovery

YahooNews.com - Full Article

Maher al-Mounes
AFP • March 3, 2019

Damascus (AFP) - A shadow of her former self after years of war, 11-year-old Arabian mare Karen stands quietly as a Syrian vet gently pushes a syringe into her pale grey neck.

"Karen used to be the beauty queen of all horses," says the vet, Ahmad Sharida.

But inside her stable near Damascus today, her hips jut out viciously from her overgrown speckled coat.

Weak and withdrawn, Karen is unable to even whinny.

After almost eight years of war, she is one of dozens of Arabian horses from all over Syria recovering from the physical and psychological trauma of the fighting.

Prized for their beauty, endurance and speed, Arabian purebreds are one of the oldest horse breeds in the world.

In Syria, Bedouins have bred them in the north of the country for centuries, seeking to maintain the purity of the local bloodlines.

Before the conflict, Sharida had proudly watched Karen grow from a long-legged foal into a graceful equine beauty.

"I know her very well. I was the one who brought her out of her mother's belly," says the vet, a stethoscope hanging around his neck.

But he lost sight of Karen after she was stolen from her stable in Eastern Ghouta in 2012, the same year rebels overran the region northeast of Damascus.

The area suffered five years of regime bombardment, as well as food and medicine shortages under a crippling siege, before Russia-backed government forces took it back last year.

Sharida had long fled his home region but returned to search for missing Arabian horses and immediately recognised Karen when he found her in October...

Read more here:
https://news.yahoo.com/war-horses-syrias-arabian-beauties-plod-way-recovery-035714738.html?soc_src=hl-viewer&soc_trk=fb&fbclid=IwAR3GLIVFr5miawLERNC8IkvHAdr6gRkRYbUntWHp6QC9GKIJ1c0OzFahUYY

Thursday, February 28, 2019

Wednesday, February 27, 2019

Book Review: The Rough Magic Of The Mongol Derby

Dunwoody photo
ThoroughbredDailyNews.com - Full Review


Friday, February 22, 2019

By Kelsey Riley

“Why do humans put so much thought into some decisions, yet plunge into others like cavalier penguins?”

This was 19-year-old Lara Prior-Palmer’s revelation after a day spent poking around Google for inspiration in June of 2013 led her to the application page for the Mongol Derby. It was seven weeks out from the world’s longest and toughest horse race, most of the other 40-odd riders had been training for a year, and she didn’t have nearly enough money to cover the entry fee. Yet, there is something intensely captivating about that far off, wild landscape and its horses and people, and so, wildly unprepared, Lara hit the big red ‘apply’ button.

I can attest to that feeling of wonderment and that urge to recklessly dive in head-first despite the odds of success-or even survival–looking incredibly unlikely; four years after Lara, it was me clicking that apply button, despite having never in my life camped or used GPS navigation, and having not been on the back of a horse in three years. Hell, I didn’t even know if I still enjoyed or was capable of riding, but something about the very thought of the Mongol Derby is absolutely intoxicating.

Rough Magic, set to be released in May, is Lara Prior-Palmer’s debut book and her memoir of becoming the youngest-ever person and first woman to win the Mongol Derby...

Read more here:
http://www.thoroughbreddailynews.com/book-review-the-rough-magic-of-the-mongol-derby/