Saturday, October 23, 2021

Home is where the horse is for Veterinarian Yvette Nout

TheFencePost.com - Full Article

October 28 2921

By age 10, little Yvette Nout had already lived in several countries including South Africa, Nigeria and Kenya. Her father, a food microbiologist studying African food processes for a private company also had a working relationship with academia.

Throughout all the family’s many moves, faithfully traveling with young Nout was a deepening love for horses. When she was 7, she began taking riding lessons from an English woman in Kenya. Sitting upon that first pony, “Brownie,” the child felt totally at home, regardless the country in which she lived.

When she was 10 and settled into her new location in The Netherlands (where her ancestral roots were planted), she continued with weekly lessons. When that schedule proved too infrequent for her, she mucked out stalls and did others horsey chores in trade for more classes. Eventually she worked at a riding camp saddling, grooming and leading younger children on rides...

Read more here:
https://www.thefencepost.com/news/home-is-where-the-horse-is/

Sunday, October 03, 2021

Bismarck Man & His Horse Vegas – An Incredible 276-Mile Journey

Hot975FM.com - Full Article

Bromo
Published: October 2, 2021

Boy, you talk about going out and doing something that very few people get a chance or even think about trying, this is it. David Sterna and a 'friend' of his just accomplished something pretty special - living a bit of history so to speak.

An incredible 276-mile journey

According to Kfyrtv.com "David Sterna and his buckskin quarter horse Vegas are back in Mandan after a long journey. They took to the Bismarck-Deadwood trail and traveled 276 miles" - this same trail was used during the late 1880s and David set out to explore what it was like back then - he and his trusty horse...

Read More: Bismarck Man & His Horse Vegas - An Incredible 276-Mile Journey | https://hot975fm.com/bismarck-man-his-horse-vegas-an-incredible-276-mile-journey/?utm_source=tsmclip&utm_medium=referral

Friday, September 24, 2021

Equestrian Adventuresses Podcast: Cairngorm100 – Scotland’s Own Tevis Cup

EquestrianAdventuresses Podcast - Listen

by utetonia
September 13, 2021

In today’s episode, we travel to Scotland and talk about Scotland’s very own Tevis Cup, the Cairngorm100 endurance ride. It takes place every two years against the stunning backdrop of the Cairngorm National Park which is one of the UK’s last true wildernesses. My guest today is Fionnghuala Paterson from Scotland who has competed in this ride not only once, but three times already. This year she emerged as overall winner and she was kind enough to talk with me about this epic ride across the Scottish Highlands, what makes it so special and her own personal experiences competing in it.

listen:
https://equestrianadventuresses.com/2021/09/13/horse-podcast-ep-182-cairngorm100-scotlands-own-tevis-cup/

Happy Trails: Saddle Up for the Great Canadian Hike

Horse-Canada.com - Full Article

Canada’s 28,000 km Trans Canada Trail awaits you this fall to hike, walk, run, skip, paddle, roll, stroll, bike or ride.

By: Kim Izzo | September 22, 2021

If you’re yearning to take a break from the 24/7 news cycle, or at least from scrolling Instagram, we’ve got a fun activity for you and your horse to take part in. The second annual Great Canadian Hike has begun. Running from September 15 through to October 31, the event is a national challenge that encourages Canadians to get off the sofa and into nature to embrace their local trail in the company of friends, family, and yes, horses (and dogs!)

Organized by Trans Canada Trail (TCT), the Great Canadian Hike has a big goal: to get people from all 13 provinces and territories to disconnect from screens and reconnect with our great outdoors by collectively spending 28,000 hours on Canada’s 28,000 km national trail. It’s all part of trying to create a positive experience after the last 18 months of Covid-19 isolation. And yes, you can also choose to hike, walk, run, skip, paddle, roll, stroll, or bike. Naturally, we at Horse Canada think sitting on a horse is the best way to view the country...

Read more here:
https://horse-canada.com/horse-news/happy-trails-saddle-great-canadian-hike/

Wednesday, September 22, 2021

Happy trails: Mandan, S.D. resident journeys 276 miles to Deadwood in the saddle

Dennis Knuckles photo

BHPioneer.com - Full Article

By Jaci Conrad Pearson, Black Hills Pioneer
September 21 2021

DEADWOOD — If anyone is wondering how long it might take to travel from Mandan, N.D., to Deadwood on horseback, David Sterna, who rode into town Friday afternoon from his hometown, can give a first-hand account.

“Thirteen days,” Sterna said, adding nights were spent under the stars. “We’d go back and we stayed a lot at Chain Hill. We’d ride so many miles and go back and camp and the last four days, I stayed with my cousin, Joe (Sterna) in Newell.”

Choosing to make the trek and follow the 276-mile Bismarck to Deadwood stagecoach trail, which ran from 1876 to 1880, Sterna said he did it in honor of his family’s three generations of ties to the land and the dying art of working with horses.

“Our family’s the end of an age,” Sterna said. “We farmed with horses. We had horses our whole life. I’m the youngest grandson out of eight brothers and the last one left with a horse and I always wanted to try and make a long-distance trip and we did it...”

Read more here:
https://www.bhpioneer.com/local_news/happy-trails/article_5582dcb0-1b05-11ec-99f8-634b280f77f9.html

Tuesday, August 24, 2021

Quesnel Canadian Rangers familiarize themselves with historic Gold Rush terrain

QuesnelObserver.com - Full Story

REBECCA DYOK
Aug. 20, 2021 5:30 a.m.

On horseback, members of the Quesnel Canadian Ranger Patrol (CRP) trotted through an area with a rich history of gold mining last month in a mission stimulating what it would like when they are called to deploy for a ground search and rescue.

Exercise Goldfield Sojourn got underway Thursday, July 15, with a convoy of trucks and trailers driving from Quesnel to Wells where a reception centre was set up. Rangers met with village residents, community officials, members of the local RCMP detachment and the Wells Volunteer Fire Brigade.

From there, the rangers drove to a new location and set up an administration area and camp where they spent the night, said Captain Natasha Tersigni, public affairs officer with 4th Canadian Ranger Patrol (CRP).

The group departed on horseback in the morning and rode through Barkerville Historic Town and Park up to Groundhog Lake, riding a rocky, steep trail that follows the old Cariboo Wagon Road and a historic ditch line.

“When called upon to assist, members of the CRP typically have less than an hour to gather their equipment, including their horses, and begin deploying to the location where the search will occur,” Tersigni said...

Read more here:
https://www.quesnelobserver.com/news/quesnel-canadian-rangers-familiarize-themselves-with-historic-gold-rush-terrain/

Thursday, August 12, 2021

Bute vs Banamine – what's the difference?

HorseAndRider.com - Full Article

The two pain-relieving prescription medications that most horse owners keep on hand are Bute and Banamine – but do you know the differences between the two?

JILLIAN SINCLAIR
UPDATED:AUG 4, 2021 - ORIGINAL:AUG 4, 2021

Both Bute and Banamine are non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) that are used to reduce inflammation and pain in horses. While these drugs sound similar and seem like they could be interchangeable, there are actually several different situations for when you should use one or the other. Read on to see the main differences between Bute and Banamine, and when the right time to use each one is...

Read more here:
https://horseandrider.com/horse-health-care/bute-vs-banamine-whats-the-difference?RiderNL&%3Butm_medium=email&%3Butm_campaign=Newsletter&utm_campaign=HAR%20%20-%20NL&utm_medium=email&_hsmi=147302396&_hsenc=p2ANqtz--vTXS0jCfMzaFsfoh8yL2Yd8atKVhkQkmutE9psOoMBEAa-zawmXlthIpFwzE5hXFxQtxlF7CzSNmwiq8sUqSG83_WLQ&utm_content=147302396&utm_source=hs_email

Sunday, August 08, 2021

Staving Off Summer Weight Loss in Horses

TheHorse.com - Full Article

Don’t forget horses require calories to keep cool in the heat.

Posted by Clair Thunes, PhD | Aug 2, 2021

Q. With the extreme heat this summer I’m struggling to keep weight on my horse. I’m not used to dealing with summer weight loss. Our pastures are pretty dried out, so we are feeding a good amount of hay. Typically, I just feed a balancer, but this doesn’t seem to be enough. Do you have any advice?

A. We often think of weight loss in horses as a winter issue, when they need more calories to keep warm. However, we don’t often consider that horses also require calories keep cool in hot weather.

Thermal neutral zone (TNZ) is the range of environmental temperatures horses need for minimal metabolic regulation to maintain their internal temperature. When horses are within their TNZ, the basal rate of heat production equals the loss of heat to the environment. They neither heat up nor cool down...

Read more here:
https://thehorse.com/1102454/staving-off-summer-weight-loss-in-horses/?utm_medium=Nutrition+enews&utm_source=Newsletter

Wednesday, August 04, 2021

Equine Air Scenting: Are Search-and-Rescue Horses a Thing?

Horse-Canada.com - Full Article

Horses have unique qualities which enable them to detect scents, which anyone can try at home to give your horse a chance to problem-solve.

By: Kim Izzo | July 28, 2021

Search and rescue teams, the military and police, border patrol officers, all employ the unique talents of “sniffer dogs.” We’ve seen footage of these dogs in the news, searching for survivors at catastrophic events like the recent condo collapse in Surfside, Florida, or we’ve witnessed them firsthand being walked through baggage claim at airports. The dogs are highly-trained professionals. And now, they have competition: sniffer horses (and ponies).

The practice of “equine air scenting” is used by various organizations in Western Canada, the United States and the United Kingdom, where some horses are also trained in drug detection. Currently there are no ‘professional’ equine sniffers in Ontario, but that might soon change.

The Ontario Mounted Special Service Unit (OMSSU), a non-profit organization made up of volunteers, is currently training horses in the air scent division with the hopes of being given work in the fields that require such a service. Cindy Fuerth, director of OMSSU, told Global News that the group is planning to expand and hire in the coming year by recruiting around 20 riders to the program. The program will involve the owners/riders and their horses to complete intensive training. Riders will also take online and in-person classes...

Read more here:
https://horse-canada.com/magazine/equine-ownership/equine-air-scenting-search-rescue-horses-thing/

Tuesday, July 13, 2021

Good golly Mollie: why I rode 1,000 miles around Ireland on a Connemara pony

TheGuardian.com - Full Article

Hilary Bradt
Mon 12 Jul 2021 01.30 EDT

The guidebook publisher’s dream of a solo horseback trip came true, but proved a greater challenge – and more exhilarating – than she’d thought possible

When did I first make the transition from enjoying horse riding as an accomplishment to realising that seeing spectacular scenery from the back of a horse is an end in itself – slow travel at its very best? I think it was in the Grand Tetons in Wyoming, about as spectacular a place as you can get, but also as tiring as any mountain hike if you’re on foot, with thin air, steep paths and treacherous drops.

On my horse Everest (of course I sent a photo home of Hilary on Everest), I could just gaze unimpeded at the snow-patched mountains, the gurgling streams and the big sky, and soak up the feeling of emptiness. My friend and I stayed on a dude ranch, slept in tents at night and rode an 80-mile circuit on those comfy western saddles. That holiday, in the 1960s, confirmed the rightness of my childhood dream of buying a horse and riding a long, long way...

Read more here:
https://www.theguardian.com/travel/2021/jul/12/why-i-rode-1000-miles-around-ireland-on-a-connemara-pony

Relief in sight for global horse industry battling gastric disease

MirageNews.com - Full Article

12 July 2021

Millions of horse owners the world over are set to benefit from a more effective method to treat equine gastric disease, a common condition affecting horses, especially in thoroughbred racing and the endurance riding sector.

An eight-year joint project between the University of South Australia and animal health industry partner Luoda Pharma has produced a long-acting, weekly injectable medicine, which heals horses a lot faster than current treatments.

Lead researcher, UniSA pharmaceutical scientist Professor Sanjay Garg, says the current standard treatment for gastric disease – an oral paste – has to be administered daily into the horse’s mouth and sometimes is only 30 per cent effective.

“It is not only time consuming but not all horses accept this treatment willingly. For maximum effect, horses also can’t be fed prior to the paste being administered,” Prof Garg says.

The new injectable formulation of omeprazole developed by UniSA and Luoda Pharma is now used widely in horses in Europe, with outstanding results, and has become the treatment of choice for many veterinarians...

Read more here:
https://www.miragenews.com/relief-in-sight-for-global-horse-industry-593852/

Dealing With Equine Colic: Here are 33 Do's and Don’ts

Thehorse.com - Full Article

Do you know what to do–and just as importantly, what not to do–if your horse displays vague, mild, or serious signs of what might be colic? Your answer could save your horse’s life.

By Marcia King

The changes indicating colic were subtle but nevertheless concerning. Rufus, a Thoroughbred/Warmblood jumper, wasn’t himself, recalls owner Sydney Durieux of New York City. “Rufus was always attentive, playful almost, wrapping his neck around you and giving you a kind of hug, straining his neck to reach you,” she describes. But that evening Rufus ignored Durieux and just stared, looking distracted and vaguely uncomfortable. “He wasn’t swaying, pawing, or looking at his stomach, but when the trainer listened to Rufus’ belly, she couldn’t detect any sounds,” she says.

After a half-hour, Durieux trailered him to a veterinary hospital an hour away. “Both the trainer and I thought we might be overreacting, but our hunch was right: The veterinarian said Rufus had colic and needed immediate surgery,” she says. “I was shocked, because every other horse I’d seen with colic had been very distressed.”

Sometimes it’s pretty obvious something is painfully wrong and the veterinarian should be summoned. Other times mild clinical signs might accurately reflect a mild colic that easily and quickly responds to minimal management without a vet even seeing the horse. Then there are those times when mild clinical signs don’t indicate the severity of a problem that could result in death if treatment is delayed.

Do you know what to do–and just as importantly, what not to do–if your horse displays vague, mild, or serious signs of what might be colic? How do you handle the situation? Actions to take/avoid with your horse’s recovery plan? How to minimize the risk for colic in the first place?

The following are 33 tips to use as guidelines...

Read more here:
https://thehorse.com/features/dealing-with-equine-colic/?utm_medium=Health+enews&utm_source=Newsletter

Thursday, July 08, 2021

Goals

GoPony.me - Full Article

JUNE 30, 2021 / ASHLEY WINGERT

At the last Arizona Endurance Riders Club learning event, the topic of discussion was on goal-setting within endurance. One of the beautiful things about this sport is how varied and encompassing those goals can be. Whether it’s starting out and having a goal of getting to and finishing your first ride, or setting your sights on Top Tenning at Tevis and showing for the Haggin Cup, and everything in between those two points…endurance seems to be able to accommodate a wide range.

It’s no secret that I have always dreamed big when it comes to this sport. I set my sights high, am willing to take risks and chances, and don’t always wait for the stars to be in 100% alignment before trying something…but that also means I’ve frequently fallen short of hitting those goals. And at least as of yet, it still hasn’t stopped me from dreaming and setting more goals.

If nothing else, this sport will teach resilience, and make you dig deep to hold on to your inner grit and determination. It teaches you how to re-frame disappointment and perceived failure...

Read more here:
https://gopony.me/2021/06/30/goals/

Thursday, July 01, 2021

Algae in Horse Water Troughs: Is It Safe?

TheHorse.com - Full Article

Our nutrition expert offers tips for keeping algal blooms to a minimum in your horse’s water trough this summer.

Posted by Clair Thunes, PhD | Jun 5, 2017

Q: For most of the year my horses live out full time on pasture. In the summer their water trough grows a lot of algae. Is it okay for them to drink from the trough when it has algae, and what can I do to stop it growing? A:Algae in troughs is a common problem once temperatures start to rise. To grow, algae need water, sunlight, and a nutrient source. Nutrients can come from organic material that has blown into the trough, manure, or even your horse’s saliva.

While most algae don’t pose a direct health concern, certain types of blue-green algae release toxins that can lead to colic and diarrhea. Additionally, a lot of algae might make the water less desirable to your horse and lead to reduced water intake. Keeping algal blooms to a minimum in your troughs is therefore a smart idea. Here are some solutions...

Read more here:
https://thehorse.com/110425/algae-in-horse-water-troughs-is-it-safe/?utm_medium=Reader+Favorites+enews&utm_source=Newsletter

Sunday, June 27, 2021

Nevada, Missouri, Friends Riding Horses Cross Country To Mount Rushmore

WIBWnewsnow.com - Full Article

JUN 16, 2021 @ 8:59AM

By Frank J. Buchman

“Cris and Forrest are living their dream.”

The Nevada, Missouri, horsemen left home June 1, 2021, on horseback with one packhorse headed to South Dakota’s Black Hills.

“It’s something I always wanted to do. We decided the window of opportunity was right and just took off,” said Cris Rodriquez.

“I really hadn’t even ridden horses until about two years ago. But then got into riding with Cris and here we are,” added Forrest Drury.

“We really don’t have a set route, just follow our instinct, with advice we’re given along the way,” Rodriquez admitted. They do have solar powered cell phones with maps and also use a GPS global positioning system.

Traveling an average of about 23-miles per day, the horsemen ride both major highways and country backroads.

“We try to take in as much of the different landscapes as we can,” Rodriquez said. “We have ridden up to 36 miles in a day, but that’s too much as hot as it’s getting.”

“The best part of the journey though has been meeting all of the people,” Drury insisted. “Everybody is very congenial, welcoming, interested in what we’re doing...”

Read more here:
https://www.wibwnewsnow.com/nevada-missouri-friends-riding-horses-cross-country-to-mount-rushmore/

Friday, June 25, 2021

Pennsylvania: Riding Stable Offers Second Career For Former Montco D.A.

Patch.com - Full article

Mike Marino was near the end of his term as the Montgomery County district attorney when he had the idea to open a riding stable.

Delaware Valley Journal, News Partner
Posted Wed, Jun 23, 2021 at 4:21 pm ET

By Linda Stein, Delaware Valley Journal

June 23, 2021

Mike Marino was near the end of his term as the Montgomery County district attorney when he had the idea to open a riding stable as a way to keep busy after leaving office. And the name for the stable, "Red Buffalo Ranch" came to him in a dream, he said in a recent interview with the Delaware Valley Journal.

He had no idea the riding stable–which offers trail rides, lessons and a summer camp for kids–would become so successful when he opened it in 1998.

"The saying goes, 'If you build it they will come,'" he said. And although it was shut down for three weeks last year during the pandemic, once Gov. Tom Wolf re-opened the parks the stable, which abuts Evansburg State Park, was back in business.

"Because you're on a horse, you're socially distant so people could ride without the mask on and still be compliant," he said. "Well, people started coming out of the woodwork because people wanted to get away, to get out and our business doubled."

Marino, 79, who grew up as a city kid in Norristown, didn't know much about horses when he got his first steed in 1970. He was an assistant district attorney then making $7,500 a year and his mother asked him if he could afford the horse.

"And I said, 'No, but I'm going to buy him anyway,' and that was my lucky horse," said Marino. "Because of that horse, I ended up here, with property. It was a very fortuitous horse..."

Read more here:
https://patch.com/pennsylvania/across-pa/riding-stable-offers-second-career-former-montco-d

100! Western States Endurance Run is back, includes local threat among elite men

GoldCountryMedia.com - Full Article

Rocklin’s Tollefson set to compete for first time; women’s field strong again

Bill Poindexter Jun 23, 2021 10:30 AM

What happens when excitement clashes with pent-up energy? Show up for the Western States Endurance Run on Saturday and find out.

The field is a little smaller this year as the 100-mile event returns for its Olympic Valley-to-Auburn run, but it’s no less packed with star power, including Jim Walmsley, who broke the course record in 2018, then hacked another 20 minutes off his mark a year later.

Jared Hazen, like Walmsley from Flagstaff, Ariz., was the runner-up in 2019. Rocklin’s Tim Tollefson is in the Western States for the first time and becomes an immediate threat. He won the Bishop High Sierra on May 22 by 35 minutes.

Meanwhile, eight of the top 10 women from 2019 are back in the Western States, including defending champion Clare Gallagher of Boulder, Colo., and runner-up Brittany Peterson of Pocatello, Idaho. Diana Fitzpatrick, president of the board of directors for the Western States Endurance Run, described the international women in the elite field as “exciting...”

Read more here:
https://goldcountrymedia.com/news/190282/100-western-states-endurance-run-is-back-includes-local-threat-among-elite-men/

Monday, June 14, 2021

Tevis Fever - Ashley Wingert

GoPony.me - Full Article

JUNE 2, 2021 / ASHLEY WINGERT

It never goes away. It might ebb and wane for a time, but it’s always there, waiting.

51 days and counting until this year’s Tevis. This week, I’ve been working on finalizing details and travel arrangements for heading out there to crew again. Within a couple of months following the 2019 ride, Cathy put crew dibs on me for the following year…which, of course, got cancelled. So those crew dibs rolled forward into this year.

Earlier in the year, I was “meh” about it. Not sure I wanted to travel, unsure of how many restrictions would still be in place and have to be dealt with, how many hoops jumped through…just not sure it was worth it. But as plans have started to come together, and as life starts to once again slowly start resembling something a little closer to “normal”, without “new” attached to the front of it…I can feel myself getting excited again...

Read more here:
https://gopony.me/2021/06/02/tevis-fever/

Saturday, May 29, 2021

Why thru-riding horseback rider Gillian Larson believes women should go on more adventures

Today.com - Full Article and video

Gillian Larson became the first solo thru-rider of the Pacific Crest Trail in her 20s. Here's why she wants more women to "feel free in our environment."

May 27, 2021, 12:52 PM PDT / Source: TMRW
By Erica Chayes Wida

We are all works in progress; even the successful women you see owning it on Instagram faced stumbling blocks along the way and continue to work hard to stay at the top of their game. In this series, we're sitting down with the people that inspire us to find out: How'd they do it? And what is success really like? This is "Getting There."

Through the deserts, backcountry and treacherous mountain passes of the West Coast is a trail. It stretches 2,650 miles from the Mexican to the Canadian border. And in 2014, Gillian Larson became the youngest documented woman to ride it alone on horseback.

Thru-riding is the term for the people who mount their horses and see the country in its wildest places by riding long-distance trails. Some of the most famous in the U.S. include the Pacific Crest Trail, or PCT, and the Continental Divide Trail. Larson, a native Californian who's just 29, has ridden both in their entireties, amassing more than 10,000 miles. She first did the PCT at just 22 years old, becoming the youngest woman to do so, and again in 2016.

Some may recognize the trail from the Reese Witherspoon film, "Wild," based on the 2012 memoir by Cheryl Strayed, who thru-hiked 1,100 miles of it.

Larson is an equestrian with a masters in biology who was raised about 45 minutes outside of Los Angeles in Topanga Canyon, California. And while she's accomplished a groundbreaking feat and is being recognized for her achievements, which includes starring in a documentary short film by Firestone Walker, she remains humble and eager for her next quest...

Read more and see video here:
https://www.today.com/tmrw/why-thru-riding-horseback-rider-gillian-larson-believes-women-should-t219701

How to build a trustworthy trail horse

EquusMagazine.com - Full Article

Three seasoned trail riders offer strategies for overcoming the most common spoilers of the great-outdoor horseback experience.

EQUUS
UPDATED:MAR 10, 2017 ORIGINAL:MAY 20, 2008

Ah! A nice, relaxing trail ride on a pleasant summer day: What could be better to break the tedium of ring work and soothe the stresses of show training? Just head for the hills, the woods, the rolling meadows on horseback, alone or in congenial company, and all your troubles will melt away. Yeah, right... until your horse refuses to cross the creek or runs in terror from an innocent boulder or takes up a bone-jarring jig that puts you both in a lather for the duration of the ride.

When horses and their riders are unprepared for the out-of-arena experience, a simple walk through the woods turns into a series of frustrating or frightening confrontations. The disconnect between expectations and reality often begins with the choice of mount.

"Most people don't select horses for trail riding," says Montana horseman Dan Aadland, an avid backcountry rider and author of several books on the topic. "I get tired of hearing, 'Well, she's not good enough for the show ring, but she'll make a good trail horse.' Why should trail riding be relegated to a secondary job for a horse? If you want to trail ride exclusively, buy a horse who excels at it, not one who can't do anything else..."

Read more at:
Equus Magazine

Wednesday, May 26, 2021

Woman trekking across Nevada stops in Nye

PVTimes.com - Full Article

By Daria Sokolova Special to the Pahrump Valley Times
May 25, 2021 - 11:34 pm

After taking a year-long break due to the pandemic, Samantha Szesciorka is riding her horse across Nevada again to discover the state and promote wild horse adoption and public land preservation.

This year, Szesciorka is making her way from Las Vegas to Carson City with her horse Sage and her dog Juniper for the first time and making several stops in Nye County. She arrived in Las Vegas from Reno where she lives – a week before starting her ride on May 1.

“I like the challenge, but it’s just a fun personal project. I like getting to know Nevada on horseback, because it’s just a slow immersive way to see the state and see parts of it that many people don’t get to see,” Szesciorka said in a phone interview with the Pahrump Valley Times...

Read more here:
https://pvtimes.com/news/woman-trekking-across-nevada-stops-in-nye-99562/

Tuesday, May 18, 2021

The Performance of Endurance Horses

FEI.org - Full Article

18 May 2021
by Alison Lincoln

Alison Lincoln is a rider, author, coach and freelance groom with a degree in Equine Sports Coaching

Alison Lincoln looks at the importance of energy supply, training and recovery for long-distance horses... Competitive Endurance rides are a test of the athlete’s ability to safely manage their horse’s stamina and fitness while coping with the varying terrain, distance and weather conditions on the course.

At elite level, rides can be up to 160km (100miles) long and split into 3-6 loops. That’s exactly the distance we’ll see this weekend when the Longines FEI Endurance World Championship is held in Pisa, Italy.

At the start of Endurance competitions and at the end of each loop all horses must pass a veterinary examination before being allowed to continue. If a horse fails any of these ‘vet gates’ then their result is classified as FTQ (failure to qualify).

Research at international level events show that fast riding speeds in the early stages of a ride (loops 1 and 2) and when riding in large groups is a significant risk factor linked to negative outcomes for horses and tends to be followed by a sudden drop in speed in the following loop.

In both cases, it’s likely adrenalin takes over causing combinations to get ‘carried away’ and end up travelling at speeds they haven’t trained for or aren’t capable of maintaining for any length of time.

More often than not this leads to an FTQ classification due either to lameness or fatigue. Fatigue is more than just tiredness, it’s the muscles’ inability to continue to work and occurs primarily due to the depletion of energy stores or the build-up of lactic acid. (You know that burning feeling after you’ve stacked a barn full of hay? That’s lactic acid build-up)...

Read more here:
https://www.fei.org/stories/sport/endurance/performance-endurance-horses

Monday, May 17, 2021

Book Interview: a horseback adventure recalled, 30 years on

IrishExaminer.com - Full Article

Hilary Bradt speaks with Isabel Conway about 'A Connemara Journey'.

SAT, 15 MAY, 2021 - 13:00

- A Connemara Journey: A Thousand Miles on Horseback through Western Ireland has just been published by Bradt Guides. - See www.bradtguides.com and www.hilarybradt.com

Ask veteran explorer and travel guide writer Hilary Bradt why it took her over 30 years to publish “the most important adventure of my life, the one that changed me forever” and she has a great excuse. A string of guide books, tour-leading in remote parts of the world, plus running a successful business accounted for only part of the hold-up.

She had galloped through the rough manuscript, helped by detailed diaries and tape recordings, committing a rich tapestry of human encounters, sublime Irish landscapes, places of historic interest and the odd tall story heard during her epic 1,000-mile solo horseback journey through parts of Connaught and much of Munster back in 1984 to the page in a few weeks. Then Hilary lost her manuscript.

The co-founder of Bradt Guides – today with over 200 titles the world’s largest independently owned travel guides publisher – was fulfilling a childhood ambition to do a long-distance horseback ride which brought her to Ireland, giving free rein to her adventurous spirit and two Connemara ponies...

Read more here:
https://www.irishexaminer.com/lifestyle/artsandculture/arid-40289600.html

Sunday, May 16, 2021

Searching for the Big Five on a Horseback Safari

FEI.org - Full Story

16 May 2021
Words by Sophie Baker

Sophie Baker enjoys the wonders of South Africa with some delightful horses...

I’m seated on an expansive riverside deck overlooking the South African bushveld.

My riding helmet, atop the table, rocks back and forth ever so slightly as a gentle breeze does its best to pierce through the midday heat. As I wash down a bite of homemade orange cake with a sip of coffee, Gerti Kusseler starts the safety briefing.

First up; a form stating that if I don’t follow instructions carefully, I “might get eaten.” Not by her husband, Phillip Kusseler, head guide and the other half of the dynamic German duo. But by the lions and elephants we're going in search of – on horseback.

I’m at Wait A Little, South Africa’s only horseback safari that offers guests the opportunity to see the Big Five from horseback: lion, elephant, rhino, buffalo, and leopard.

They say that Africa gets under your skin, and into your blood. You see, once you’ve set foot on her soil - like it or not - Africa is in your veins...

Read more at:
https://www.fei.org/stories/lifestyle/my-equestrian-life/horseback-safari-south-africa-wait-little

Thursday, May 13, 2021

Horse & Rider Podcast Episode 39: The Ride - Gillian Larson

Horse & Rider Podcast - Listen

This episode of The Ride is brought to you by Soft-Ride Comfort Boots. Nichole and Michaela sit down with Gillian Larson (@thru_rider) to talk about her trail riding adventures. Gillian was the youngest woman to thru ride the Pacific Crest Trail on horseback–and she has done it twice. She was the first person to thru-ride both the Pacific Crest and the Continental Divide Trail—eventually accumulating more than 10,000 backcountry wilderness miles. Listen to this inspiring episode. Then check out Gillian's short film here!

Listen at:
Horseandrider.com/podcasts