Thursday, June 20, 2019

Electrolytes Vital for Performance Horses

KER.com - Full Article

June 2, 2017
By Kentucky Equine Research Staff

More than one horse owner has asked herself this simple question, “Why don’t feed manufacturers put electrolytes in feed specifically designed for performance horses?” According to Joe Pagan, Ph.D., founder and owner of Kentucky Equine Research (KER), this is a reasonable question but one that is easily answered.

“A horse’s energy requirement stays the same during consistent work,” explained Pagan, “but sweat losses change with weather, work intensity, and other factors. Horse owners need to be able to easily adjust the amount of electrolyte given based on sweat production.”

The two most common questions Pagan addresses about electrolyte supplements include what type of product is best and how much electrolyte should be fed.

In selecting a product, Pagan advocates simplicity. “Pick an electrolyte that is salty. A lot of electrolytes are full of sugar. The horse may love it, but it doesn’t have a lot of electrolyte in it,” he said. “Look at the label, find one that has sodium, chloride, and potassium as the primary ingredients...”

Read more here:
https://ker.com/equinews/electrolytes-vital-performance-horses/?utm_source=KER+Newsletter&utm_campaign=c889f961f5-Focus_on_Electrolytes&utm_medium=email&utm_term=0_0d95781dfc-c889f961f5-11166

Tuesday, June 18, 2019

Got Healthy Hooves? Here’s How to Keep Them That Way

TheHorse.com - Full Article

Posted by Heather Smith Thomas | May 22, 2019

Consider the big picture, from farrier care and diet to environment and genetics, when working to keep horse hooves healthy
My horse is barefoot. And sound. And his feet look pretty great, if you ask me. What can I do to keep them this way? Are there special products I should be using or certain ways I should be managing them? What if someday he needs shoes?

These are just a few of the many questions horse owners ask about their horses’ feet. They’ve heard about or have managed less-ideal feet, so it’s only natural to want to keep things going the way they are and stave off problems. We gathered advice from two farriers on how to have the healthiest of hooves, with or without shoes.

Paul Goodness, CJF, a farrier at the Virginia-Maryland College of Veterinary Medicine’s (VMCVM) Marion duPont Scott Equine Medical Center, in Leesburg, Virginia, says horses’ feet are fairly resilient and can adapt to many conditions, but sometimes they need a little help. Travis Burns, CJF, TE, EE, FWCF, assistant professor of practice and chief of farrier services at the VMCVM, agrees, and says horse owners can do many things to help their horses maintain healthy hoof capsules...

Read more here:
https://thehorse.com/19088/got-healthy-hooves-heres-how-to-keep-them-that-way/

Pony Express riders arrive at Fort Churchill, Carson City, Genoa and Tahoe this Wednesday

CarsonNow.org - Full Article

Submitted by Jeff Munson on Sun, 06/16/2019

Imagine you live in the year 1860 with vast wilderness, wide-open plains and high desert between Missouri and California. You're one of the chosen riders on top of a horse with a mochila strapped on your saddle, navigating along the trail where unknown dangers may be ahead.

You're not on a leisure trip, you're one of a team of boys and young men traveling 1,966 miles in 10 days on horseback, delivering mail to and from the West.

Even though the Pony Express lasted just 18 months (having been replaced by the transcontinental telegraph line that started just 10 weeks after the Pony Express began), the lore and legend live on. In its short history, the Pony Express has become synonymous with the Old West. In the era before easy mass communication, the Pony Express was the thread that tied East to West...

Read more here:
https://www.carsonnow.org/story/06/16/2019/pony-express-riders-arrive-fort-churchill-carson-city-genoa-and-tahoe-wednesday?fbclid=IwAR2qJoMGSbTM_1PRcvHGsLm5kkZe5-vi72xsJAfJNhekrsAjRbcIpbqYn48

Saturday, June 15, 2019

USEF and ADS Unable to Reach Agreement After Initial Affiliate Agreement Concludes

USEF.org

by US Equestrian Communications Department | Jun 11, 2019, 10:30 AM EST

Lexington, Ky. - In January of 2017, the USEF terminated its relationship with the American Driving Society (ADS) because that organization was unwilling to reach an agreement regarding its responsibilities as the Recognized Affiliate for the Driving discipline. In May of 2017, the ADS and USEF were able to reach agreement on key issues including competition licensing, licensed officials, anti-doping efforts and a continued commitment to work together to grow the driving discipline. These efforts resulted in the reinstatement of ADS as the Recognized Affiliate until the end of November 2018, at which point the two organizations would meet again to determine the path forward and renew the Affiliate Agreement.

Unfortunately, after the initial Affiliate Agreement expired, and despite continued negotiating through repeated extensions of the Agreement, the two organizations could not come to an agreement and have agreed it is in the best interest of both organizations to part ways. As the current Agreement is expired, this decision is effective immediately.

“Recognized Affiliate Association status offers significant benefits, but also comes with great responsibility,” stated USEF Chief Executive Officer Bill Moroney. “Relationships between the USEF and its Recognized Affiliates must be mutually beneficial in order to best serve the needs of the horses, athletes and the sport of equestrian. In today’s environment, there are higher requirements to ensure fairness and safety, added scrutiny, and increased exposure associated with operating as an amateur sports organization and this can create challenges. USEF is uniquely positioned to assist our Affiliates in meeting those challenges so we can all enjoy a safe environment.”

Moroney continued: “We recently met with ADS leadership and developed several proposals regarding competition licensing, licensed officials, alignment of rules and anti-doping for presentation to the ADS Board of Directors. We are very disappointed that the ADS Board of Directors was unwilling to accept these proposals required to keep our environment safe and fair, despite USEF’s best efforts to be flexible regarding their Affiliate concerns. Ultimately, however, USEF cannot compromise on protecting our athletes, ensuring the welfare of our horses and maintaining the integrity of our sport.”

USEF continues to work with organizers and competitors to make certain athletes at every level have access to the competitive opportunities and resources needed to hone their talents. USEF is committed to the continued development of the sport of driving and will immediately begin a process to replace the ADS with a new Recognized Affiliate for driving.

Friday, June 14, 2019

Scientists unravel the mysteries of endurance horse metabolism

Horsetalk.co.nz - Full Article

June 13, 2019
Horsetalk.co.nz

Horses studied in a 160km endurance race made an effective metabolic switch from carbohydrate consumption to lipid consumption, but in doing so managed to maintain higher blood glucose levels than horses competing over shorter distances.

Lipid metabolism is known to take place during endurance exercise as a way of maintaining the energy supply as the glucose level falls. But, interestingly, researchers found that blood glucose levels did not fall as much in horses competing over the longer distances.

Scientists, in a paper published in the journal Frontiers in Molecular Biosciences, have taken what they describe as the first step toward unraveling the energy metabolism in endurance horses...

Read more here:
https://www.horsetalk.co.nz/2019/06/13/scientists-mysteries-endurance-horse-metabolism/

Janet Rose Recognized by US Forest Service for Safely Placing Mules, Horses After Retirement

June 12 2019

Stories From USFS Nine Mile the “Face of Adoption”

Frenchtown, Montana (June 12, 2019) In a special awards ceremony earlier this spring, the United States Forest Service recognized Janet Rose for her dedication and success in safely placing mules and horses retired from USFS Ranger Station duty into safe and permanent adoptive homes.

Rose works with Horse Haven Montana, which since its inception in 2007 has assisted federal and county agencies including US Forest Service and Border Patrol in ensuring the present and future welfare of its pack and riding animals that have fulfilled their service. Rose founded the Equus International Film Festival© in 2011as a benefit event for Horse Haven Montana.

EIFF19 included ‘The History of the Historic Nine Mile Ranger Station Equine Program,’ a special presentation with Nine Mile Ranger Station Livestock Manager Casey Burns, and Nine Mile Ranger Station Resources Assistant Laura Johnson, who shared stories of the working horses and mules of Nine Mile, one of the oldest federal equine programs still operating in the United States.

“When horses and mules are retired from the USFS, Horse Haven Montana, the parent organization of EIFF, places its senior geldings and mules in permanent adoptive homes,” says Rose.

Those retiree success stories include USFS horse Rocko, and mules Cooper (aka Farmer) and Duchess, once a lead mule on the famous Nine Mile pack string, who found her retirement home with a family and became the first love of its little boy. Another Horse Haven happy ending is Jezzy, who came from a private owner who could no longer afford to keep her, and was adopted into a family full of small children with big hearts.

“This is the face of adoption,” Rose says. “The Forest Service folks were telling me at the awards ceremony that in the past, they were usually required to take the animals to auction. Sometimes they ended up with an outfitter, but that meant more work for horses and mules well beyond their working years. They were being retired because they had done their service! And if they didn’t go to an outfitter, then too often they might go on to an unimaginable fate.”

“I have never thought of my work with them or with adoption as being that big a deal but now it is a real alternative to slaughter or working senior animals beyond their years. And I know that animals such as Cooper have gone on to incredible homes, and are incredible animals for the people who receive them. Often these are families: A child learning to ride, or a teenager needing a friend, or a beginner rider who needs his or her first, reliable horse.

“The Forest Service has been so incredibly appreciative that we can take these animals, that they have loved and cared for and worked with for years, and find them the great retirement homes they deserve.”

Janet Rose is available for interviews and to share her stories of the mules and horses writing the next chapters in the history of the American West. Contact her at jrt@montana.com and learn more at www.horsehavenmt.org.

Saturday, June 01, 2019

Trailer Breakaway System

Trailmeister.com - Full Article

May 31 2019
by Robert Eversole

The Trailer Breakaway System –The breakaway system is your first line of defense is the event of a very bad situation.

This is vitally important safety device works with your trailer brakes to protect you and the people around you in the event that your trailer becomes separated from your vehicle. A separation event is unpredictable and highly dangerous. The breakaway system is designed to minimize damage and injury.

The system is made up of a battery on your trailer and a switch connected to a cable. One end of the cable attaches to your trailer, while the other end attaches to your vehicle. If the primary connection (receiver/hitch/coupler) between your vehicle and trailer fails, the trailer will pull the cable as it breaks free. The switch will actuate the battery and firmly apply the trailer brakes to slow the trailer. – [NOTE: safety chains are NOT part of the primary connection between truck and trailer. They are a last resort.]

Always securely connect the breakaway cable to your vehicle. You can test the breakaway system by pulling the cable. Your trailer brakes should immediately activate and lock up the tires. To disengage, simply replace the key in the switch...

Read more at:
https://www.trailmeister.com/trailer-breakaway-system/?fbclid=IwAR1AaCWizMXqIo1mXcr7-OE6eX8TT1A4CcnVziNQT4CgHkKSo4biQfHTl3c

Friday, May 31, 2019

Cannabis use (hemp products) in horses and pets

TheFencePost.com - Full Article

May 30, 2019

Heather Smith Thomas
hsmiththomas@centurytel.net

Cannabis is a genus of flowering plants that includes multiple species and several different “strains” within those species. These plants originated in Asia, but are grown in many regions around the world. Hemp is the term that refers to varieties of Cannabis cultivated for non-psychotropic drug use — to produce hemp fiber, seeds (food) and their oils. Other varieties — often called marijuana — are often used for medicinal purposes and as a recreational drug.

The cannabis plant contains more than 100 different chemicals but the two main ones are cannabidiol (CBD) and tetrahydrocannabinol (THC). Industrial hemp products are made from plants selected to produce abundant fiber. Some of these strains are bred to produce minimal levels of THC, which is the main psychotropic (mind altering) constituent of cannabis. Other strains of cannabis have been selectively bred to produce a maximum of THC, the strength of which is enhanced by curing the flower. Marijuana’s THC content is usually 10% or more but hemp must have a THC content of 0.3% or less, according to federal and state laws. At this low level, cannabis has no intoxicating effect, for people or animals. The CBD in hemp has many beneficial effects on the body without the dangers that come with THC.

USE ON ANIMALS

Today there are a growing number of CBD products available for pets and horses. People who have used cannabis for medicinal purposes (helpful for certain diseases and pain issues), often use it on their animals; the natural next step was veterinary use, to help relieve various ailments in pets. Dr. Robin Downing, hospital director at the Windsor Veterinary Clinic, Downing Center for Animal Pain Management in Windsor, Colo., said that for several decades, pet owners have been trying to help their animals by giving them products containing CBD...

Read more here:
https://www.thefencepost.com/news/cannabis-use-hemp-products-in-horses-and-pets/



Caifornia: Mountain Lion Killed After Boy, 4, Attacked on Hiking Trail: DFW

NBCSanDiego.com - Full Story

A recording informs visitors the trails at Los Penasquitos Canyon Preserve were closed Tuesday due to a wildlife issue

By Dave Summers, R. Stickney and Christina Bravo
Published May 27, 2019

A 4-year-old boy is lucky to be alive after being attacked by an 80-pound wild cat, likely a mountain lion, in a Rancho Penasquitos canyon on Memorial Day, a wildlife official said Tuesday.

A female mountain lion suspected of attacking the boy was shot and killed by wildlife officers hours later, California Department of Fish and Wildlife (DFW) spokesperson Lt. Scott Bringman said.

The boy was hiking with a group of six adults and five children in the Los Peñasquitos Canyon Preserve, in an area known as Carson's Crossing at the center of the preserve, when the animal attacked at about 2:30 p.m., SDFD Battalion Chief Rick Ballard told NBC 7...

Read more here:
https://www.nbcsandiego.com/news/local/large-cat-attack-rancho-penasquitos-mannix-road-sdfd-girl-510492431.html?fbclid=IwAR1ULwFX9hjaswb3XzQdOCD3OQAn46qLjZx4GCaT1IJHJMPQejvSVIa9uRE

Thursday, May 30, 2019

Fish Oil May Help Muscle Adaptation in Athletic Horses

KER.com - Full Article

May 20, 2019
By Kentucky Equine Research Staff

Post-exercise inflammation helps the body respond and adapt to exercise, ultimately boosting realization of athletic potential. Too much inflammation following training, however, can cause muscle damage and loss of performance.

How can horsemen help ensure that inflammation remains beneficial and not damaging? Feed fish oil.

“Certain fish oil is high in eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), which have inherent anti-inflammatory properties, stunting inflammation at multiple cellular levels,” explained Kathleen Crandell, Ph.D., a nutritionist for Kentucky Equine Research...

Read more here:
https://ker.com/equinews/fish-oil-helps-muscle-adaptation-in-athletic-horses/?partner=ker&utm_source=KER+Newsletter&utm_campaign=d9c6dbd3c9-KER_Equinews_052919&utm_medium=email&utm_term=0_0d95781dfc-d9c6dbd3c9-11166

Risk Assessment: Equine Gastric Ulcers

KER.com - Full Article

June 4, 2018 By Kentucky Equine Research Staff

Poor performance in athletic horses can have multiple causes, including equine gastric ulcer syndrome (EGUS). Not only can EGUS negatively impact training and competition outcomes, these lesions contribute to decreased appetite, weight loss, and colic. Does your horse have EGUS? Is he at risk? If so, what can be done?

EGUS includes ulcers found in either the glandular (lower) or the squamous (higher) stomach. Ulcers in those regions are referred to as equine glandular gastric disease (EGGD) and equine squamous gastric disease (ESGD), respectively.

Estimates on the prevalence of gastric ulcers indicate:...

Read more here:
https://ker.com/equinews/risk-assessment-equine-gastric-ulcers/?partner=ker&utm_source=KER+Newsletter&utm_campaign=d9c6dbd3c9-KER_Equinews_052919&utm_medium=email&utm_term=0_0d95781dfc-d9c6dbd3c9-11166

Tuesday, May 28, 2019

Feeding Performance Horses

KER.com - Full Article

March 21, 2019
By Kentucky Equine Research Staff

Horses are superior athletes. Physical adaptations through evolution have given horses speed and endurance. Selective breeding has narrowed and refined desirable athletic abilities in modern horses. Some of the physiologic adaptations include high maximal aerobic capacity, large intramuscular stores of glycogen, specific ratios of muscle fiber types within breeds, splenic contraction to increase circulating red blood cells, efficient gaits, and the ability to regulate heat stress through sweating.

The inherent athletic ability of the horse is impressive. However, to achieve optimal performance in any equine sport, a conditioning program must be designed that improves cardiovascular function, capillary density in muscle, flexibility, bone strength, increased muscle mass, increased energy substrate storage, and more efficient utilization.

Carbohydrates and Fats

Performance horses require water, protein, minerals, vitamins and, most importantly, energy. Energy can be supplied by carbohydrate, fat, and protein. Protein is used very inefficiently for energy. Carbohydrates can be categorized by how they are digested. Grains such as oats, corn, and barley contain high levels of starch that are digested by enzymes in the stomach and small intestine. Forages and high-fiber by-products are composed primarily of cellulose, hemicellulose, pectins, and indigestible lignin. These structural carbohydrates vary tremendously in energy level, from beet pulp that has the same digestible energy as oats to mature grass hay, which can provide 65-75% less digestible energy...

Read more here:
https://ker.com/equinews/feeding-performance-horses/?partner=ker&utm_source=KER+Newsletter&utm_campaign=36b1830c37-KER_Equinews_040319&utm_medium=email&utm_term=0_0d95781dfc-36b1830c37-11166&mc_cid=36b1830c37&mc_eid=6283eb0e4a

Friday, May 24, 2019

When the Phone Says “No Service” – Satellite Messengers

trailmeister.com - Full Article

May 13 2019
by Robert Eversole

When the Phone Says “No Service”

When you’re out in the wild and need to call for help, don’t be surprised if your cellphone reads “No Service.”

Losing your cell signal while outdoors can be annoying — but if you’re out riding or camping your cellphone signal can mean the difference between life and death. Injuries, being lost, and any other number of hazards can mean we need to call for help — but if there’s no signal to carry your message, then what do you do?

Unlike the phone you use every day, GPS communicators don’t need a cell signal to work. Instead, they use the network of satellites constantly orbiting overhead. Not only can they be used to track your position, but they can also be used to send and receive packages of data. We’re talking around 140 characters, like in the early days of text messaging. That may not sound like much, but it’s enough to tell your loved ones where you are (or that you’re delayed), receive medical advice, and even download an up-to-date weather report. They can also contact search and rescue virtually anywhere if the world if the sh@t really hits the fan.

I tested the three most promising satellite messengers from SatPaq, SPOT, and Garmin. I won’t sugarcoat it: none of these tools are perfect. That being said all of them could save your life when the trail gets rocky...

Read more here


Thursday, May 23, 2019

Check Horses’ Alfalfa Hay for Blister Beetles

Thehorse.com - Full Article

BLISTER BEETLES IN ALFALFA CAN BE DEADLY. HERE’S WHAT TO WATCH FOR AND HOW TO KEEP YOUR HORSES HEALTHY.

Posted by Kristen M. Janicki, MS, PAS | May 20, 2019

It might be hard to imagine that an essential part of the horse’s diet could contain potentially deadly hidden toxins. But it’s a hard truth that horse owners must be aware of: Alfalfa hay can harbor blister beetles (Epicauta spp), which can contain a harmful toxic substance called cantharidin.

A member of the Meloidae family, blister beetles live throughout the United States and Canada. Their average body length is about 0.3 to 1.3 inches. A blister beetle’s diet is mainly composed of pollen, blossoms, and leaves of flowering plants, making alfalfa the perfect meal for them. Most alfalfa infestation occurs during late summer and early fall, when the adult blister beetle population also peaks.

Male blister beetles produce a natural defense toxin called cantharidin. This irritant can cause blisters on skin (of both horses and humans) within a few hours of contact, hence the insect’s name. When ingested, cantharidin is lethal in horses with as little as half a milligram per kilogram of body weight, equivalent to consumption of around 125 beetles for an average-sized horse. And it’s not just the live insects that are harmful: The toxin is still effective long after the beetle dies...

Read more here:
https://thehorse.com/112252/check-horses-alfalfa-hay-for-blister-beetles/

Tuesday, May 21, 2019

Risk - by Irish Horse

Trails-and-trials-with-major Blog - Full Story

May 12 2019
by Irish Horse

A very sad event happened on a local trail: a horse tried to turn on a very narrow trail, lost it's footing, and slid down the side, where it broke it's leg. It had to be euthanized. This is a tragedy for horse and rider, and I have nothing but sympathy for them. There were posts wondering what trail it was, and I realized this is a trail I ride weekly. I never thought this section was particularly dangerous, but it sadly was for that horse.

Some folks called for the trail to be closed, some for it to be inspected, (which was done, and it was determined it wasn't any worse than other parts of the trail), and some remarked that horses and riding are inherently risky activities. There was a comment that all of our trails should be brought up to a higher safety standard. While great in theory, that would literally mean about 95% of the trail in question (Pioneer Express) and probably 85% of the Tevis trail (just to name a few!) would be deemed unsafe.

This brought up many different, and sometimes conflicting, ideas in my head. I DID almost slide down a (even steeper) cliff alongside the trail myself earlier this year. Luckily my athletic horse saved us. It could have gone very wrong. Maybe I should have been paying more attention to exactly where he places his feet, and riding more aggressively, but I do let Major pick the trail most of the time. Will I be more attentive in those steep sections after that? Most certainly!...

Read more here:
http://trails-and-trials-with-major.blogspot.com/2019/05/risk.html

Monday, May 20, 2019

The Long Haul to a New Home

Horseandrider.com - Full Article

A cross-country move—with a horse—is a lot to take on. Whether you’ve accepted the job of your dreams or are moving closer to family, these 12 tips will help you plan and execute a successful relocation of your horse.


KATIE NAVARRAFEB 23, 2018

Nearly a decade ago, Megan Carter and her then-12-year-old Arabian gelding, Amigo, prepared for a long trek from Juneau, Alaska, to the Eastern Seaboard. The climate and culture of upstate New York was a stark contrast of her native Alaska, but provided a once-in-a-lifetime career opportunity. But after 10 years, it was time for Carter and Amigo to return home.

“I answered the call of the eagles and decided it was time to follow my heart and return home to be with my family and friends,” she says.

In less than six weeks, Carter orchestrated a 4,000-mile relocation for herself and the now 22-year-old Amigo. Her eight-day trip crossed 12 states, the Continental Divide, and the Mississippi and Missouri Rivers, and traveled through international waters. Travel by land culminated in Bellingham, Washington. There are no roads connecting Juneau to the rest of Alaska—or even the rest of North America. That meant the final three days of the journey were aboard a ferry boat.

It wasn’t the pair’s first cross-country experience, but a lot had changed in horse relocation since they’d left Alaska. Carter relied on her tried-and-true strategies from her first adventure and learned a few more. Here she offers 12 tips to make your cross-country—and even cross-water—excursion more comfortable for you and horse...

Read more here.

Sunday, May 19, 2019

History rides in on horseback

LMTribune.com - Full Article

Nez Perce Tribe’s famed Appaloosa horses among stars of Culture Day

May 19 2019
By ERIC BARKER of the Tribune

SPALDING — Nez Perce riders dressed in full regalia and sitting astride their beautiful Appaloosa horses rode into the Nez Perce National Historic Park Saturday morning.

The dappled sunshine flooding through the trees at the park matched the distinctive spots for which the horses are known as the riders circled an event tent at Culture Day.

Joe Lewis, of Spokane and vice president of the Nez Perce Appaloosa Horse Club, said the breed that was developed by the Nez Perce Tribe in the 1700s is known for its endurance and strength. Lewis is a great-great grandson of Ollokot, a Nez Perce leader and key figure in the War of 1877, and brother of Chief Joseph...

Read more here:
https://lmtribune.com/northwest/history-rides-in-on-horseback/article_44571775-3319-541f-97b1-7529754067b7.html

Friday, May 10, 2019

Suited to Endurance?

DistanceRidersOfManitoba.ca - Full Article

April 25, 2019 by Darice Whyte

I sold one of my beautiful Arabian mares recently. I have owned Shalimar Cierra Rose for 10 years and during that time I tried to make her into an endurance horse. Despite my best attempts it just wasn’t her forte. I could tell she was thinking “how much further is this crazy lady going to ride me?”

She certainly wasn’t a 50 mile horse and she had way more whoa than go. She preferred to show me how well she could jump logs on the trail than race down the trail.

Someone once said to me “they can’t all be endurance horses you know”. I thought he was referring to other breeds. Not an Arabian! But yes, he was right. You just can’t fit a square peg into a round hole. Sometimes it just doesn’t work even if it is an Arabian...

Read more here:
http://www.distanceridersofmanitoba.ca/DRM/2019/04/25/suited-to-endurance/

Equine Colic Imitators

TheHorse.com - Full Article

MANY OTHER CONDITIONS BESIDES COLIC CAN CAUSE COLICLIKE SIGNS. AND AS WITH COLIC, DELAYED TREATMENT OR MISDIAGNOSIS CAN HAVE SERIOUS CONSEQUENCES. HERE’S WHAT YOU NEED TO KNOW.

Posted by Alexandra Beckstett, The Horse Managing Editor | Apr 22, 2019

IS IT ABDOMINAL PAIN OR SOMETHING ELSE?

Discover your horse restless, pawing, and lying down repeatedly in his stall, and you might immediately think, “He’s colicking.”

Nine times out of 10, you’re probably right. But it’s important to understand that many, many other conditions besides colic can cause coliclike signs. And as with colic, delayed treatment or misdiagnosis can have serious consequences.

“For many of these conditions, if you were to inadvertently take a horse to (exploratory colic) surgery, you might very well might make the animal worse, not to mention spend a lot of money unnecessarily,” says Barbara Dallap Schaer, VMD, Dipl. ACVS, ACVECC, associate professor of emergency medicine and critical care at the University of Pennsylvania School of Veterinary Medicine, in Kennett Square.

Dealing With Equine Colic: Here are 33 Do's and Don'ts
RELATED RESOURCE: Dealing With Equine Colic: Here are 33 Do’s and Don’ts

Veterinarians define colic as abdominal pain or discomfort—something she says is critical for owners to understand. The classic signs of a horse with colic are many...

Read more here:
https://thehorse.com/157326/equine-colic-imitators/

Thursday, May 09, 2019

Should I Wrap an Abscessed Hoof?

TheHorse.com - Full Article

Dr. Britt Conklin offers suggestions on how to keep an abscessed hoof clean.

Posted by Britt Conklin, DVM | Apr 16, 2019

Q. My horse recently had a deep abscess in her hoof and a friend advised me to keep the hoof wrapped for a bit to prevent bacteria from getting trapped into the hole as it heals. Is this a good practice? And how long should I keep her hoof wrapped?
—Via email

A.Abscesses are simply pressurized pockets of bacteria, fungi, or dying tissue that expand and travel along the path of least resistance in the foot. They’re frequently found in the epidermal layers of the wall, sole, or frog but can migrate along planes into dermal or deeper tissues when the path of least resistance drives them that direction...

Read more here:
https://thehorse.com/112599/should-i-wrap-an-abscessed-hoof/

Tuesday, May 07, 2019

Cooling a hot horse

MelNewton.com - Full Article

May 5 2019
by Mel Newton

Here’s a highly simplified and barely scientific explanation of why it’s important to cool a hot horse during a vet check at an endurance ride.

It boils down to this simple concept:

Blood has lots of jobs to do in the horse’s body. Once your horse is standing in the vet check, the blood has two choice – cool the body by going to the skin and releasing heat, or go to the GI system and absorb water, calories and electrolytes. There’s only so much blood to go around, so if it’s busy cooling your horse down, it won’t be helping the digestion system move around and do its thing. You gotta help your horse cool so the blood can prioritize the digestion system!...

Read more here:
http://melnewton.com/2019/cooling-a-hot-horse/?fbclid=IwAR3u_PIyja4_vYMkoL_jnP93TXqtQQuzZ4sxJjcDgZ19ZdqG-Yojdwu1A50

Monday, May 06, 2019

Morgan horses are an American original

LeaderTelegram.com - Full Article

May 6 2019
By Carol Watson Correspondent

The Morgan horse has proven its worth in a variety of equine disciplines, including dressage, show jumping and driving. Known for its speed, courage and gentle nature, the Morgan also is America’s first native breed.

An unusual beginning
In 1789, a Middleton, Vt., schoolteacher named Justin Morgan acquired a small colt in payment for a debt. Giving him the name of Figure, the colt’s pedigree was uncertain, although there was some evidence to suggest that he was sired by English Thoroughbred True Briton. (a.k.a. Beautiful Bay).

Standing just 14 hands high, Figure was fast and smart with so much speed and stamina that he could out-pull a draft horse and outrun the speediest racer. Stories of his exploits spread throughout New England, and Figure was soon in demand for his stud services.

Known for his prepotency, Figure passed on his good looks and abilities to his progeny, including three of his sons — Bulrush, Sherman and Woodbury. They would become the foundation bloodstock of the Morgan breed.

In his later years, Figure was put out to pasture, although he did have one final moment of glory when he was chosen to carry then-President James Monroe on a July 1817 muster-day parade in Montpelier, Vt.

Four years later, Figure died at the age of 32 from the kick of another horse on the Levi Bean Farm in Tunbridge, Vt. He is buried on that farm under a a large gray stone just 15 miles away from the grave of his namesake and first owner, Justin Morgan...

Read more here:
https://www.leadertelegram.com/country-today/horses/morgan-horses-are-an-american-original/article_7ff9a3e3-0b99-52c5-b8cd-4db685632c93.html

Tuesday, April 30, 2019

Veterinarians Discuss How to Manage Equine Gastric Ulcers

TheHorse.com - Full Article

From when to administer ulcer medication to how to deal with recurring ulcers, veterinarians offer tips and tricks on managing this common horse health condition.


Posted by Stacey Oke, DVM, MSc | Feb 20, 2019

Dealing with equine gastric ulcer syndrome (EGUS) can leave owners with more questions than answers. And they’re not alone—it turns out veterinarians have questions about EGUS, too.

As a remedy, vets participated in a question-and-answer format Table Topic on managing EGUS during the 2018 American Association of Equine Practitioners convention, held Dec. 1-5 in San Francisco, California. Frank Andrews, DVM, Dipl. ACVIM, director of the Equine Health Studies Program and clinical medicine service chief at Louisiana State University School of Veterinary Medicine, in Baton Rouge, and Sarah Reuss, VMD, Dipl. ACVIM, a veterinary specialist with Boehringer Ingelheim Animal Health, co-moderated the discussion.

Equine gastric ulcer syndrome collectively refers to ulcers or erosions in either the squamous (upper) or glandular (lower) regions of the horse’s stomach. These painful lesions have been identified in a high number of horses, particularly those in intense training and competition, and a variety of dietary and management factors can make them worse. Gastric ulcers can cause performance issues and ill-thrift and might signal the need for husbandry changes. They also warrant aggressive treatment and management...

Read more here:
https://thehorse.com/166040/veterinarians-discuss-how-to-manage-equine-gastric-ulcers/

Monday, April 29, 2019

Brendan Riley’s Solano Chronicles: ‘Deafy’ Derrick’s Tall Tales

TimesHeraldOnline.com - Full Article

By BRENDAN RILEY |
April 28, 2019

Frank “Deafy” Derrick, one of Vallejo’s most colorful characters a century ago, claimed to have ridden with Kit Carson to Montana, where he met William “Buffalo Bill” Cody and they both became Pony Express riders and Indian fighters. It turns out Derrick made up many of his stories — but he still had plenty of true horseback adventures.

When Derrick died in 1938, the San Francisco native was eulogized as “one of the last links” to the Wild West. Newspapers recounted his story of running away at age 10 and winding up in Virginia City, Nev. He said he then rode with Carson from Nevada to Montana, meeting Cody there in 1862. “Deafy,” who got his nickname (pronounced deefy) because he was deaf, also told of fighting Indians on his 75-mile-long Pony Express route. He said he was wounded 10 times by bullets and arrows.

There are many holes in those stories. For starters, in 1862 “Buffalo Bill” was a teenager in Kansas, and his own claim of riding for the Pony Express has been challenged. The Pony Express started in 1860, lasted only 18 months and was gone before the end of 1861 — and its route never ran through Montana. Then there’s Derrick’s claim in his later years to be nine or 10 years older than he really was — possibly to put him closer in age to “Buffalo Bill” and make his stories more believable. But numerous records show he was born in 1856. Skinny boys in their teens were favored as Pony Express riders, but not 6-year-old children — Derrick’s age in 1862. As for riding with Kit Carson, Carson’s last stop in Nevada was in 1853 — three years before Derrick was born — and he was mainly in New Mexico throughout the 1860s...

Read more here:
https://www.timesheraldonline.com/2019/04/28/brendan-rileys-solano-chronicles-deafy-derricks-tall-tales/

Friday, April 26, 2019

Heather Wallace, The Timid Rider, Launches Equestrian Confidence Retreat in Mongolia

April 24 2019

Discover, immerse, and build confidence in the saddle while learning horsemanship in the heart of Mongolia. Experience the nomadic culture from the back of an ancient breed of horse. Relax, have fun, and enjoy the ride while changing your mindset into one that is more positive!

A brand new and exclusive horse-riding retreat will launch July 2020 in the Khentti Plain of Mongolia, hosted by Heather Wallace, The Timid Rider, and Camille Champagne, an FEI 3* Endurance Rider and Natural Horsemanship Trainer.

This retreat is the perfect opportunity to explore the Mongolian nomadic culture for riders that may struggle with confidence in the saddle. Learn natural horsemanship to understand behavior better and improve communication, learn a positive mindset and meditation techniques. Muster horses with the nomads, ride across the Gobi Desert with Heather and Camille, and end the day with yoga, and so much more. The possibilities are endless.

One week can change your life.

We are now taking applications. Six spots are available for July 26 to August 1, 2020.


About Heather Wallace

Heather Wallace is the award-winning author of Confessions of a Timid Rider, and equestrian blogger at The Timid Rider talking honestly about confidence, challenging yourself, and overcoming obstacles.

Heather is also the Content Manager and a regular writer for EquineInfoExchange.com as well as the Media Coordinator for the Gobi Desert Cup, an endurance race in Mongolia. In her spare time, of which she has little, she spends her time with her husband, three children, two dogs, and pony. You can follow her on social media @timidrider or at timidrider.com.

Contact:
Heather Wallace
Ph: 732-784-7195
Em: heather@timidrider.com
www.timidrider.com