Monday, June 19, 2017

Observations from the vet line

MelNewton.com - Full Article

June 15, 2017 Posted by Melinda

Last weekend I had the pleasure of vetting another endurance ride. I would be hard pressed to decide what I enjoyed more – vetting or riding. Both are rewarding, hard work, long days, and come with lessons learned.

Oh yes, I learn as much from working the vet line all day as I do out on the trail.

Here are the things that Mel-the-vet wants Mel-the-rider to do differently at rides (or continue to avoid) based on what she’s seen on this side of the line – and maybe there’s some things that resonate with you too.

(Note I’ve been meaning to write this post for a couple of years, so not all “lessons learned” are from this weekend).

Trot out

Leaving a good impression in the vet line boils down to 2 really simple things – trot out well, stand still for the rest...

Read more here
http://melnewton.com/2017/observations-vet-line/

Saturday, June 03, 2017

Mississippi's Story

Equinerescuefrance.org - Full Story

Posted by WW on May 30, 2017

Pine Lodge Mississippi is a 1998 NZ gelding, bred by Keith Galpin from the purebred Arabian Australian imports Bremervale Serena, and the sire Bremervale Legacy.

n 2001, Donna Fox went to Galpin’s stud to look for a riding horse, but he had nothing suitable. As chance would have it, Galpin was ‘passing by’ Donna’s place a few weeks later, and he had Miss on board, convinced that the unbroken 3yo was the horse for Donna! Galpin was travelling south, and said that if she really didn’t want him, he’d pick him up again on the way home. Mississippi was a striking individual from an early age, so there’s no Sherlock awards being handed out for guessing that the horse stayed put! He was too pretty be a gelding hence his name was shortened to Miss, and true to form he quickly established himself as the best boy!

I’ll let the rest of his story run in Donna’s words. Her respect and pride in him shine out, and we can’t imagine how devastated she was to find he’d being chucked on the scrap heap.

‘All my Arabian horse friends said he would be too much for me, and he was. Way too much horse. However, he did not have a dirty bone in his body and I only ever experienced one buck when his tail got wet crossing a river. He never threw me off but we did crash and burn a few times. He never kicked or bit or had any vices other than he completely believed he was royalty and should be first in line for everything. He took the attitude right from the start, that he knew it all and if I only I would just sit there and let him get on with it – hence the odd crash.

Miss was like a Border Collie, he was born to work. He just wanted to get out there and do it, skip, all the fancy educating and get on with the job. He was very quick and easily bored. Mentally he had to be engaged all the time. Left to his own devices he would think he knew it all and take shortcuts. He was a horse that you had to have a full riding partnership with, you could not go to off in a daydream. He was very easy to read, and when happy would blow thru his nose at every stride, in this odd sort of soft puffy snort. He was a talkative horse...

Read more here:
http://www.equinerescuefrance.org/2017/05/mississippis-story/

Tuesday, May 30, 2017

Influencing Iggy - Patti Stedman

EnduranceIntrospection.com - Full Story

by Patti Stedman | May 28, 2017

It’s just another one of those “do as I say, not as I do” moments …

Countless times I’ve told other people with new horses, fretting over this or that, that it takes a year to get to know a horse.

It’s been two months since we picked up a new horse in South Carolina. Iggy, as I’ve been calling him, is an 11 year old Arabian who did a 50 mile ride and a couple of shorter rides several years ago, but has been for the most part unemployed for the past few years.

He belonged to a friend of a friend who wanted him to go to someone who would take good care of him, keep him for life and see what he could do in the sport...

Read more here:
http://enduranceintrospection.com/wp/influencing-iggy/

Friday, May 26, 2017

New Film From Galway Sportsground to the Mongol Steppes

Advertiser.ie - Full Article

BY CHARLIE MCBRIDE
Galway Advertiser
May 25, 2017

The Galway Film Fleadh is rapidly approaching and among the gems to look out for is the world premiere of All The Wild Horses, Ivo Marloh’s terrific feature-length documentary about the Mongol Derby.

This is the longest and toughest horse race in the world. With a route based on Genghis Khan’s empire-wide network of postal depots, the 1,000 kilometre race sees riders from all over the world and all walks of life compete on a relay of semi-wild horses across 25 stations in the Mongolian wilderness. Taking over a week to complete and entailing dawn-to-dusk rides, arduous terrain and extremes of weather, this is an epic equine adventure without equal.

Marloh’s film captures all the race drama as it unfolds amid the stunning steppe landscape and Fleadh audiences will surely be drawn to the stories of the two Irish riders taking part; Donie Fahy, from Meath, and Galway’s own Richard Killoran who both came to the race with backgrounds as professional national hunt jockeys. Ahead of All The Wild Horses’ Galway premiere, Richard Killoran chatted with me about his experiences and impressions of this unique race.

I began by asking whether horses were part of his upbringing. “They were and they weren’t,” he replies. “I grew up near the Sportsground on College Road and there weren’t many horses around there and there were no jockeys in the family before me. I started going to riding school in Claregalway when I was 11 or 12 and that’s when I first got the bug for it. I used to enjoy going to the races with my father and I then went to the racing school when I was 15 and I moved England not long after that. I actually retired as a full time jockey a few years ago but I am doing some riding out at the moment...”

Read more here:
http://www.advertiser.ie/galway/article/92727/from-galway-sportsground-to-the-mongol-steppes

Friday, May 19, 2017

Tick-Borne Disease: Tremendously Tricky in Horses

Thehorse.com - Full Article

By Natalie DeFee Mendik, MA
May 6, 2017

Learn the latest on diseases horses can get from ticks and why they continue to frustrate veterinarians and researchers


If the sight of a tick makes your skin crawl—even if it’s not crawling on your skin— you’re not alone. That feeling is founded on more than a natural aversion to arachnids; diseases transmitted by ticks can pose a real health threat. With Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) maps outlining tick ranges throughout the majority of the United States, it’s important we brush up on our understanding of tick-borne diseases. In this article we’ll take a look at the three that pose the biggest risk to horses: Lyme disease, anaplasmosis, and piroplasmosis.
Lyme Disease

Horse owners living in areas of the country heavily infested with Ixodes scapularis, commonly known as blacklegged ticks (also referred to as deer ticks or bear ticks), know these parasites are more than a nuisance. In these regions contracting Lyme disease from infected ticks is entirely possible for horses and humans alike.

Lyme disease is a very difficult disease to prevent, diagnose, and treat in horses, says Linda Mittel, MSPH, DVM, senior extension associate at Cornell University’s Animal Health Diagnostic Center, in Ithaca, New York. Horses contract Lyme disease when the spirochete (a type of bacterium) Borrelia burgdorferi is transmitted through the bite of an infected tick...

Read more here:
http://www.thehorse.com/articles/37604/tick-borne-disease-tremendously-tricky-in-horses?utm_source=Newsletter&utm_medium=reader-favorites&utm_campaign=05-19-2017

Wednesday, May 17, 2017

Stem Cell Reality Check

Horse-canada.com - Full Article

Written by: Carley Sparks

Still in its infancy, stem cell therapy has the potential to transform equine medicine. While some applications have encouraging results, horse owners should exercise caution in these early days, when it comes to purchasing products that boast the benefits of stem cells.

Few, if any, areas of scientific study have captured the imagination of medicine and the masses alike as definitively as that of stem cell research.

From celebrity endorsements – Canadian actor Michael J. Fox was the long the face of the US’s stem cells wars – to science fiction – Star Wars, Sonic the Hedgehog and Halo, to name a few – tissue engineering has been heralded as the future of medicine. And it’s not just the popular vote. The 2012 Nobel Peace Prize in Physiology or Medicine was awarded to stem cell pioneers Sir John B. Gurdon and Shinya Yamanaka. The science is that encouraging.

“Stem cells have the promise to maybe treat certain diseases that are untreatable today or where the treatment options are palliative and not very good,” said Dr. Thomas Koch, an Assistant Professor at the University of Guelph and founding Committee Member for the newly established North American Veterinary Regenerative Medicine Association. But while the promise of stem cell therapy looms large over the medical community, actual scientific knowledge about its medical applications is in short supply. At this point in its colourful history, it’s simply too early to tell what, if any, benefit stem cells will have. “Not one single thing going on in veterinary medicine with stem cells is evidence based,” said Dr. Koch. “We’re excited about it. We see a lot of possibilities and potential, but, at this point, it’s Windows Version 1. It’s experimental medicine.”

That hasn’t stopped the rush to market, however. Despite the dearth of evidence, in regards to both safety and efficacy, stem cells are currently used in veterinary practices and can be found in an array of over-the-counter supplements. Some worry the hype is overshadowing the science...

Read more here:
https://www.horse-canada.com/magazine_articles/stem-cell-reality-check/

Wednesday, May 10, 2017

Tips for Returning Horses to Work After Soft-Tissue Injury

Thehorse.com - Full Article

By Erica Larson, News Editor
Feb 25, 2017

There’s no way around it: Equine soft-tissue injuries, simply due to the nature of the sports horses take part in, are all but inevitable, said Alan Manning, MSc, DVM. The good news is veterinarians can often help injured horses return to work. He said this process generally comprises 25% treatment and 75% rehabilitation.

“When soft tissue is healing, the new tissue needs to be educated on its new job,” he said. “This occurs during the rehabilitation process and has to be done gradually.”

However, he said, there are few, if any, published protocol studies detailing how to rehabilitate horses and help them return to full work. So, at the 2016 American Association of Practitioners Convention, held Dec. 3-7 in Orlando, Florida, Manning reviewed how he returns horses with soft tissue injuries to work, a task he described as “a puzzle...”

Read more here:
http://www.thehorse.com/articles/38864/tips-for-returning-horses-to-work-after-soft-tissue-injury?utm_source=Newsletter&utm_medium=sports-medicine&utm_campaign=02-26-2017

Sunday, May 07, 2017

7 Equine Nutrition Myths Busted

Thehorse.com - Full Article

By Kristen M. Janicki, MS, PAS
Mar 3, 2017

Decipher fact vs. fiction when it comes to the complicated world of feeding horses.


Haven’t you heard that feeding a hot bran mash will help prevent colic in the winter?” Horse owners pass feed fallacies such as this down the barn aisle on a daily basis. Nutrition is one of the most difficult aspects of horse management to understand, so it’s no wonder that forage and other fodder falsehoods sprout and take root, becoming accepted as conventional wisdom. Without getting a master’s or doctorate degree in equine nutrition, how do you decipher fact vs. fiction? Here we’ll help you bust some common myths about feeding horses.
Myth 1: Horses have “nutritional wisdom” and will seek out nutrients to meet their needs

“I recently started noticing my horse licking the dirt out in the pasture. Could he be missing important nutrients in his diet?”

Read more here:
http://www.thehorse.com/articles/37698/7-equine-nutrition-myths-busted?utm_source=Newsletter&utm_medium=breeding&utm_campaign=03-19-2017

Thursday, May 04, 2017

How Endurance Cross-Training Can Help Your Performance Horse

OnTheHorse.com - Full Article

Sarah Cuthbertson and Ashley Tomaszewski
01 May 2017

Cross training has proven its benefits in human athletics but did you know it’s good for your horse too?! Like a human, horses need cardiovascular and muscular endurance to be able to perform, especially in equestrian sports like eventing, jumping, and dressage. Although, every horse benefits from a good exercise program! Endurance riders seem to have this down to a science and it’s not uncommon to hear of horses competing well into their 20’s.By incorporating endurance training into your program, your performance horse will benefit in a number of ways.

Longevity

Time is something we all seem to lack but need in endless amounts. Most Endurance riders have time to condition and campaign only one horse, which means we want to do whatever it takes to keep a sound, happy horse working for a lifetime.

Longevity is one of the greatest honours in competitive distance sports with many local and national organizations giving special awards for Decade Teams, and some riders have even reached the rare, but possible achievement of a Double Decade Team. So how do these distance riders do it? The secret, is LSD...

Read more here:
https://onthehorse.com/how-endurance-cross-training-can-help-your-performance-horse/?v=7516fd43adaa

Wednesday, May 03, 2017

Cross Training: Good for Humans, Good for Horses

Horsenetwork.com - Full Article

by Tim Hayes
April 27 2017

In 1996 I participated in a Natural Horsemanship clinic given by the late Tom Dorrance.

Even though he was a cowboy, well over half of his students rode English. Tom was a creator of miracles when it came to helping people with their horse problems (he called them: “people problems”). His message was simple: “humans and horses need to get along better.”

Tom was not only acknowledged as a great horseman but the father of a revolution in horse training…what is now referred to as Natural Horsemanship.

When the clinic was over I asked Tom what books he would recommend I read. I was expecting him to say a book with a title like, “Lessons From The Ranch.” Instead he simply said read Dressage by Henry Wynmalen. I had heard of dressage. I knew riders with English saddles practiced it. However, it was the last thing I thought a California cowboy would know about much less be recommending.

In the spring of 2001 I attended Equitana USA in Louisville Kentucky.

It was a four-day event held in two buildings each the size of New York’s Madison Square Garden. One was totally devoted to English, the other Western. On the fourth day, I listened to a wonderful talk on the benefits achieved in competitive equine events with something called Cross Training by a 28-year-old rodeo star named Ty Murray.

Two years before Ty had received the award of World Champion All Around Cowboy. It was the seventh time he received it. No one has ever done it since. Ty began his talk by saying: “When I began training for the rodeo, I realized that at 5’8” and 150lbs, there was no way I could ever control a 2,000 lb. bull. But I could learn to control myself and how I reacted and responded to them.”

Ty went on to say that he began to practice martial arts and use a trampoline to master his equine reflexes and balance. He called it “cross training.”

As I listened to Ty, I thought back to Tom Dorrance recommending I study and practice Dressage. I began to think that maybe one way to become good at one sport was to practice a different sport that has similar physical skills. I remembered years ago reading an article about professional football players who used ballet exercises in their practice to improve their agility...

Read more here:
http://horsenetwork.com/2017/04/cross-training/?utm_source=horsenetwork&utm_medium=HNS&utm_campaign=5099567&utm_term=

Monday, May 01, 2017

Trailer tack room organization

MelNewton.com - Full Article

April 26, 2017
Posted by Melinda Newton

The most important part of this post is where you don’t laugh at my “ingenuity” – i.e. red-neck git’er done technique – of creating horse trailer organization.

I haven’t yet summoned up the courage to show my husband. Several months ago he replaced the flooring in the tack room – pulled up the old carpet, carefully scraped the floor, and perfectly cut some left over rubber interlocking flooring to fit back in. It’s lovely.

I’m not so sure he would say the same about my….”storage creation” scheme, or the cowhide rug now covering the floor….

:)

The tack room in my trailer is huge but lacked anything but the basics for organization. It came with…a handful of bridle holders, 2 saddle racks, and a fixed bar. That was it.

I asked for Lowe’s gift cards for Birthday/Xmas for the project and I’ve spent 5 months thinking about different ways to modify the interior that wouldn’t require me to drill additional holes into the walls, use adhesive that will melt in the summer, and doesn’t rely on magnets (the joys of an aluminum trailer!)...

Read more here:
http://melnewton.com/2017/trailer-tack-room-organization/

Friday, April 28, 2017

Life, Loss and Stewardship

EnduranceIntrospection.com - Full Article

By Patti Stedman | Apr 24, 2017

Damn. This one is tough to write.

Ned has been a huge part of my life for nearly twenty years. And tomorrow we will be letting him go.

Some creatures — human or equine or canine — just have more personality than others. Ned has been mammoth in more than stature. When we were competing heavily and walked up to vet in, I’d see the eyes go up and down the 16+H, 1200-pound, size 4-hooved creature and I’d just say “he’s half Trakehner.”

He was meant to be the competition dressage horse whose half-Arabian self could condition with my husband.

Ned was naughty. From the day I went to look at him to purchase — he kicked at me twice when I did his flexion tests — to the last time I swung a leg over him, he had a propensity for mischief. His bolting won me a severe concussion and a fractured pelvic rim when he was just five. I learned to sit up and ride him from Moment One, helmet firmly buckled on. Still, I fell off him more times than I’ve come off in my life previous or since. He taught me fear.

Bucking was too pedestrian for Ned, so he perfected the art of leaping. The better he felt, the more he leapt. I learned to keep my reins short, my shoulders behind my seat bones and my heels down. Walter Zettl, with whom I took dressage lessons back then implored me to keep him in dressage for at least a year, “stay off ze trail.”

Back when I was first getting into the sport, there was no Facebook. There was Ridecamp. I recall asking the group, after Ned spooked on a trail and promptly jumped down a steep, treed embankment, if there was hope for a horse that appeared to have little sense of self-preservation. Almost universally, I was told to move on to a safer horse. For some reason, I didn’t.

I know why, in retrospect. It was because when he was on, he was the most amazing ride. Big gaits and full of attitude, smooth and handsome. When he wasn’t misbehaving — and to be clear, he was mostly gentlemanly — I felt like a dressage queen sitting up there on that powerful keg of horseflesh. He could dance like no other horse. And I liked him. Naughty as he was, he wasn’t mean. He was smart and opinionated and had a ridiculous sense of humor, if a horse can have such a thing. He was all about Ned...

Read more here:
http://enduranceintrospection.com/wp/life-loss-and-stewardship/

Sunday, April 23, 2017

Subtle Signs of Improper Saddle Fit

Thehorse.com - Full Article

By Heather Smith Thomas
Apr 16, 2017

Saddle fit is a hot topic. Everyone seems to know someone battling an ill-fitting saddle, if they’re not dealing with it themselves. But first things first: What are some early warning signs that your tack and your horse’s back aren’t meshing?

Clues include dry spots under the saddle after a workout (indicating too much pressure in small areas, inhibiting sweat glands). You might also see hair starting to rub the wrong way or broken off, falling out, or replaced by white hairs due to pressure necrosis (tissue death) or damage to pigment-producing portions of the hair follicles. Wet spots and dry spots indicate saddle pressure isn’t evenly distributed.

“It isn’t always the saddle causing a dry spot,” says Mike Scott, a South Carolina-based equine massage therapist and Master Saddlers Association-certified fitter. “It could be the way the rider is sitting with uneven weight distribution. Or, if the horse is high-headed with its back inverted, there may not be any pressure in certain areas because the back is hollow instead of rounded. There are multiple reasons, but uneven pressure is something to look for...”

Read more here:
http://www.thehorse.com/articles/39069/subtle-signs-of-improper-saddle-fit?utm_source=Newsletter&utm_medium=health-news&utm_campaign=04-18-2017

Friday, April 21, 2017

AHC Urges Horse Community to Take Part in USDA Agricultural Census

Horsecouncil.org

The U.S. Department of Agriculture’s (USDA) National Agricultural Statistics Service (NASS) is preparing to conduct its 2017 USDA Census of Agriculture. Horses will be included in the Census. Every five years, USDA-NASS conducts an agriculture census to determine the number of U.S. farms and ranches and gather vital information about U.S agriculture, including the horse community. The census is a valuable tool to help the USDA determine land use and ownership, livestock populations, operator characteristics, production practices, farm income as well as other important information.

The announcement of the USDA-NASS census comes as the American Horse Council has initiated their 2017 Equine Industry Economic Impact Study. The AHC economic study questionnaire will be finalized this month and begin collecting data in the following weeks. These two separate, yet concurrent studies will provide both the industry and the public with a strong image of the state of the industry in 2017. The AHC strongly encourages everyone who is offered the opportunity to participate in either, or both, of these studies to do so. The economic impact and the census are critical to promoting the horse industry.

The AHC continues to promote the USDA-NASS census due to the critical need for the horse community to be properly accounted for in the federal governments agricultural findings. The information collected by the Census will be used to develop federal and state agricultural policy for the next five years. It’s vital all farms and ranches with horses participate in the census so the USDA, and the nation at large, has accurate information regarding the size and scope of the horse community.

Farm or ranch owners who participated in the last Census in 2012 will automatically be mailed a survey that can be filled in and mailed back. If a farm or ranch was not part of the 2012 Census or has not received a form in the mail, the owner can go to the USDA’s census website http://www.agcensus.usda.gov and clicking on the ‘Make Sure You Are Counted’ button through June.

According to the USDA guidelines for the Census, a farm is any place from which $1,000 or more of agricultural products, including horses, were produced and sold, or normally would have been sold, during the year.

Further information on the 2017 Census of Agriculture can be found on the USDA’s website http://www.agcensus.usda.gov.

Monday, April 17, 2017

The Trouble With Mud

Thehorse.com - Full Article

By Heather Smith Thomas
Apr 9, 2017

When the going gets muddy, the muddy get hoof problems; here's what to look out for.

Horses’ hooves are finicky when it comes to moisture. In arid environments they tend to dry out, and in wet conditions they become too soft. If you had to choose between the two, however, dry would probably be the winner.

Continuous exposure to moisture can cause a long list of hoof problems, ranging from difficult-to-manage soft, sensitive feet that won’t hold their shape or nails, to various types of damage and infections in the capsule and its structures. Then there are the injuries due to slipping and scrambling in deep mud or bad footing, lost bell boots, and pulled-off shoes. In short, keeping horses’ feet sound and healthy can be a difficult challenge when weather is wet and footing precarious...

Read more here:
http://www.thehorse.com/articles/35687/the-trouble-with-mud?utm_source=Newsletter&utm_medium=reader-favorites&utm_campaign=04-14-2017

Thursday, April 13, 2017

Condition Your Horse Like a Pro

Thehorse.com - Full Article

By Nancy S. Loving, DVM
Apr 12, 2017

How to help endurance horses, venters, racehorses, or Western performance horses reach peak fitness

That competitive edge. It might look different for different disciplines, but this intangible has its roots in the same concept: conditioning. In short, conditioning develops the musculoskeletal, neurologic, and cardiovascular systems so they can perform athletic endeavors with the greatest efficiency and the least stress on the body.

In this article we’ll learn how riders from different disciplines condition their horses. While there is no magic recipe fit for all equestrian sports, the basic principles of conditioning remain the same across the board...

The Basics

To get fit for competition, your horse needs to be “legged up,” which entails preparing the musculoskeletal system to withstand a certain amount of impact, speed, and duration of work...

Read more here:
http://www.thehorse.com/articles/39051/condition-your-horse-like-a-pro

Tuesday, April 11, 2017

The 2017 Egyptian Event: For the Love of the Horse

Lexington, KY | Apr 10, 2017

The 37th Annual Egyptian Event will be held June 7-10, 2017 at the beautiful Kentucky Horse Park in Lexington, Kentucky. Entitled For the Love of the Horse, this year’s Event and will celebrate the devotion and dedication that Egyptian Arabian horses have ignited in owners, breeders and enthusiasts throughout history.

Attendees from over 15 countries throughout North & South America, Europe, the Middle East and Australia travel to Lexington each year to enjoy the Event’s world-class competition, festivities, educational activities, camaraderie and of course, the world’s most beautiful horses.

Show chair and Pyramid Society Vice President, Lisa Cifrese states, “The Egyptian Event is the only show of its kind in America dedicated to featuring the world’s top caliber Egyptian Arabian horses. Our members share a deep passion for the rich history and rare bloodlines of these horses, and often state that attending the Event each year is like coming home.”

Competitions and activities scheduled for this year’s Event include: halter and performance classes, championships and awards ceremonies, formal and casual socials, educational seminars, youth & family activities, unique shopping opportunities and auctions, liberty classes, a stick horse class and more. The Event will also feature the ever-popular Egyptian Breeders’ Challenge Auction on Thursday, June 8th, sponsored by DeShazer Arabians and offering breedings to over 30 exquisite Straight Egyptian stallions. On Friday evening, June 9th, attendees will enjoy The Pyramid Society’s annual Gala & Fundraiser at Fasig Tipton. The evening will begin with cocktails and superb dining followed by a live auction of fine art and other unique offerings and closing out the evening with dancing to the exciting sounds of The Body & Soul Band.

Special thanks to The Egyptian Event’s Signature Sponsor, Arabians Ltd. of Waco, Texas for their ongoing support of The Pyramid Society, The Egyptian Event and the Egyptian Arabian horse.

Sincere gratitude also goes to Albaydaa Stud of Egypt as The Pyramid Society’s Emissary Sponsor and provider of this year’s Egyptian Event show trophies and ribbons.

For a complete show schedule and spectator or participant information, visit www.theegyptianevent.com, email: info@pyramidsociety.org or call (859) 231-0771.


The Egyptian Event is hosted each year by The Pyramid Society, the world’s leading international membership organization dedicated to the Egyptian Arabian horse. Founded in 1969, The Society has maintained its mission to promote and advance these unique bloodlines through educational venues, local and regional activities, international representation and an active online community.

For more information, contact:
Carol Aldridge
The Pyramid Society
4067 Iron Works Parkway, Suite 1, Lexington, KY 40511
Ph: (859) 231-0771, Info@pyramidsociety.org, www.pyramidsociety.org

Monday, April 10, 2017

I Bought Him For His Brain …

EnduranceIntrospection.com - Full Story

by Patti Stedman | Apr 10, 2017

This week I am vacationing with my brother’s family in the Outer Banks of North Carolina.
My nieces are almost “up and out” as I like to call it, in their late teens and early twenties, and the youngest two are here, with friends in tow.

I turn 50 this year.

The platitudes I heard in my youth (largely ignored) have come home to roost.

“Youth is wasted on the young.”
“Just wait ’til you’re my age … ”
“If you don’t have your health, you don’t have anything.”

Everything from quips about metabolism, sun exposure, financial security, to notions about taking risks, and the benefits of sleep.
At 50, you are solidly who you are.

I was astounded to hear, over dinner conversation, that one of my niece’s friends had recently tattooed on an arm — “Love yours.” That’s pretty connected and heady insight for a barely twenty-something.

Perhaps this generation won’t be our ruination. (This was something I heard a lot about my own generation from folks in the grandparents’ age-range.)

I take secret joy at the uncanny personality traits I share with my older brother.

Each morning, we are the first to rise, within minutes of each other. We’re quiet and seek coffee, then immediately settle into work, or at the hotel on our way to our destination, do a tap dance of happy feet. We are anxious for the folks who sleep to a more civilized time to join us so we can hit the road.

But don’t rush us if we are on our own timeline.

When he’s in the kitchen cooking, like me, he just wants to be left alone. Help? No, thanks. I stay away. I get it.

Our Dad is just the same. Add one more vote to the “it’s all in the genes” bucket.

I marvel at my nieces. They are witty and sharp and irreverent and so uniquely them.

Our generations are so different. They are attached to their electronic devices in a fierce way, they are acutely aware of their appearance — my peers didn’t have our eyebrows “done” or sit in shops getting pedicures in our teen years — and part of me envies their self-awareness, another mourns their freedom from the burden of self-criticism.

They fight. They are cruel. As I walk on the beach, I contemplate sitting them down, admonishing them for the sharp words and the associated hurt feelings that lie deep after the battle is over. My brother and I were torturous to one another.

But the platitudes would be lost in the generational translation. If I were lucky, they might recall them as they hit my age, so what’s the point? We must make our own mistakes, take our own path, and the comfortable and peaceful ease with which my brother and I share space is a testament to the fact that we do learn, we forgive, we find a restful place to settle in with one another.
We find our lane.

I like walking alone on the beach. There’s something about the sound of the waves, the seeking out of the ‘just right’ texture and firmness of sand. I didn’t have time to paint my toenails before I left. They are bare and plain. The teens’ nails are done, of course, various shades of pastels and pinks and bright colors. I feel unfinished for a few moments as I stroll along, like a woman caught with her hair in a mess in her sweats at the grocery store by someone she’d prefer to impress.

I turn back for our rental house, hoping I’ll be able to spot our beach access stairway from the dozens that look exactly alike.
I find myself following my own footsteps. They are clear and straight and firm, and I recognize instinctively my own despite all the others. The width, the narrowness of the heel, the depth of the push-off, but most of all, I recognize the path chosen. No longer am I thinking of my feet with regard to their decoration, or their unsightly callouses in need of a good pumice stone, but the fact that they have carried me, held me up, propelled me forward (and occasionally off course) for nearly half a century.
The last year or two have been for me, lived in a bit of a fog. For reasons I cannot say, I had to choose a path that left me starting over in a way that I never imagined. It was the right thing to do, I can say that as sure as I can look in a mirror, hard, and tell myself I could begin again. These were both things I did as a mantra of sorts, during days and nights where I was unsure of either. My friends and Richard held space for my temporary insanity. Some battles you wage alone.

It has only been in the last few months that the fog has cleared a bit. I stopped waiting to live until ‘things were better.’
That, of course, was mostly because things had gotten better.

With Ace and Ned, my long-time partners and 100-mile horses retired (Ace due to ringbone; Ned due to growing melanomas), I put it out gently to the universe that I was open to a new horse for me. Sure, Richard had Sarge and Wynne and I was happily riding both, but there is something about a horse of your own. A partner.

As these things happen, I’ve found, horses started to appear. Some rejected outright, some needed a visit.

Enter Iggy. I hope his former owner will forgive me for changing his barn name...

Read more here:
http://enduranceintrospection.com/wp/i-bought-him-for-his-brain/

Friday, April 07, 2017

Carbohydrates Defined

Thehorse.com - Full Article

By Nettie Liburt, MS, PhD, PAS
Mar 29, 2017

Carbohydrates are the main source of dietary energy for horses and are important for fast, quick burning power to blast out of the gate or clear a jump.

What are carbohydrates?

Carbohydrates, also known as saccharides, are made up of sugar molecules and classified as either structural or nonstructural. Structural carbohydrates contribute to the fiber portion of the horse’s diet, while nonstructural carbohydrates (you might have heard them called NSCs) do not.

Monosaccharides contain one sugar molecule (e.g. glucose, fructose, and mannose). Disaccharides contain two sugar molecules (lactose and maltose). Oligosaccharides contain several sugar molecules, of which the most common in horse feeds is fructooligosaccharide. Polysaccharides contain 10 or more sugar molecules, and are more commonly known as starch, cellulose, hemicellulose, and pectin...

Read more here:
http://www.thehorse.com/articles/37925/carbohydrates-defined?utm_source=Newsletter&utm_medium=nutrition&utm_campaign=04-03-2017

Thursday, April 06, 2017

American Military Horses and Mules Remembered Today

NEWS RELEASE

One Hundred Years Ago Today, One Million American Horses and Mules were Joined by American Soldiers in World War One


LEXINGTON, Ky (April 6, 2017) Today the United States commemorates its World War One Centennial, marking the 100th anniversary of its entry into the war, and Brooke USA is officially launching its Horse Heroes program to honor the one million American horses and mules who also served. Brooke USA’s goal is to raise one million dollars this year through its Horse Heroes program – one dollar in memory of each of those American horses and mules, to fund equine welfare programs in some of the poorest countries around the world. See Brooke USA’s special Horse Heroes edition of its newsletter: http://conta.cc/2oa7UKN

***

Brooke USA is a 501(c)(3) charity located at the Kentucky Horse Park in Lexington, which exists solely to support the overseas work of Brooke, the world's largest international equine welfare charity. For more than 80 years, Brooke has been alleviating the suffering of horses, donkeys and mules who work in some of the poorest communities on earth. Brooke's scientifically proven, practical and sustainable solutions to enormous welfare challenges improve the lives of equine animals and the people who depend on them across Africa, Asia, the Middle East and Central America. This year alone, Brooke reached 2 million equines, benefiting 12 million people in the developing world. To learn more, visit BrookeUSA.org.

Cindy Rullman, Brooke USA
859-296-0037
Cindy.Rullman@BrookeUSA.org

Wednesday, April 05, 2017

Novel Equine Deworming Principles, Procedures in the Works

Thehorse.com - Full Article

By Stacey Oke, DVM, MSc
Apr 4, 2017

After the introduction of safe, effective, easy-to-administer chemical dewormers in the 1960s, the equine industry enjoyed the luxury of being able to control equine internal parasites with a simple push of a plunger.

Parasite-related conditions such as colic, diarrhea, poor hair coat, ill-thrift, poor performance, etc. were essentially eradicated. Rotational deworming programs—involving the frequent administration of chemical dewormers with various products—rapidly became the mainstay. Almost hand-in-hand with the use of those dewormers, however, came the age of resistance: Populations of internal parasites that could not be killed by those coveted chemical dewormers.

“Populations of roundworms and small strongyles resistant to chemical dewormers, also called anthelmintics, have been identified in all parts of the world,” explained Martin Nielsen, DVM, PhD, Dipl. EVPC, ACVM, assistant professor at the University of Kentucky’s Gluck Equine Research Center, in Lexington. “This once again puts horses at risk for the development of parasite-related diseases.”

There are only three classes of chemical dewormers (benzimidazoles, tetrahydropyrimidines, and macrocyclic lactones), and parasites have developed either established or developing resistance to all three. Combined with the fact that there are no new chemical dewormers in the pipeline for horses (a process that usually takes a minimum of five years), horses with once-treatable parasite-related health issues are now in the pre-1960s position of having no (or very few at the least) treatment options.

“New, nonchemical deworming options are necessary to continue to control equine internal parasites and optimize horse health, welfare, and quality of life,” said Nielsen...

Read more here:
http://www.thehorse.com/articles/36473/novel-equine-deworming-principles-procedures-in-the-works?utm_source=Newsletter&utm_medium=health-news&utm_campaign=04-04-2017

How to Back a Trailer

MelNewton.com - Full Article

March 28, 2017
Posted by Melinda

Backing a trailer is an essential skill as I was reminded over and over and OVER this year. Whether you have to put your trailer into a back-in only angled parking spot at the barn, make a “U” turn at a T intersection, navigate a tight ride camp, or turn around in your best friends driveway – knowing how to back a trailer is something you can’t afford to put off any longer.

There is 1 simple trick and 2 skills you need to master NOW.

I’m not going to lie. Certain truck/trailer combinations are easier to back and maneuver than others. My standard-cab long bed pick up + trailer was an absolute dream and I could wiggle my three-horse ANYWHERE. The Dodge MEGA cab 4 door turns-like-a-cruise-liner truck paired with any size trailer is an exercise in patience and near misses as I constantly mis-judge the semi-truck like room it needs to maneuver. BUT, the concepts are exactly the same. You are going to have to practice to get a feel of *your* particular rig, but my “trick” and the execution of the 2 basic skills is exactly the same whether you have a goose-neck, bumper pull, long bed, short bed etc.

The Trick
Don’t try to figure out the physics of how the truck is doing X while the trailer is doing Y. Just do this....

Read more here:
http://melnewton.com/2017/how-to-back-a-trailer/

Wednesday, March 29, 2017

Endurance Riding and Einstein

Enduranceintrospection.com - Full Article

by Patti Stedman | Mar 28, 2017

Live as if you were to die tomorrow. Learn as if you were to live forever. –Mahatma Ghandi

When we first got into the sport of distance riding, we were no Einsteins, that’s for sure. But we certainly had his enthusiasm for mistakes!

Let me tell you about our first competition.

It was a 20-mile Novice Competitive Trail Ride sponsored by OAATS, near Akron, Ohio, a mere 3 hour drive from home. Our sum total of formal education in the sport was watching Mollie Krumlaw-Smith teaching a brief segment at Equine Affaire in Ohio several months prior.

Richard was competing on his barely 5 year old Arabian, Shantih. I had my 4 year old draft cross mare, the one I’d purchased to do some lower level dressage with, Tess.

To say that Tess was a drafty girl would be like saying Shantih was “green broke.” Both are the kindest possible descriptions.

We’d “conditioned” a bit, riding at Allegany State Park on a loop of trail that we were quite certain must be about 14 miles in distance, which turned out to be about 8 or 9. (No GPS back then and we hadn’t a clue about pacing. We were out there for hours, it had to be a long way, right?)

Richard had purchased a “custom made” saddle for endurance. It was a thing of beauty. Did it ever really fit Shantih? I kind of doubt it, but by the time he was six and had gone from a spindly creature to a broad specimen, I guarantee you it did not.

We bought a used truck camper, entered the ride, left after work on Friday so that we could settle in and relax on Saturday and then compete on Sunday before driving home.

I neatly organized my clothes for the weekend and left them folded on our bed. They never made it to the camper.

We got a little confused on the directions to the ride camp, got lost (and almost broke up right there on the highway outside of Akron), and arrived at camp so late that no one was there to greet us. So we just parked out of the way, tied one horse to each side of the trailer with a hay net full of hay and a bucket of water, and called it a night.

Tess ate her hay in no time and reminded me –gently (as was her way)– to refill it, by kicking the trailer hub cap with her size four shoes, and if that was too subtle, she picked up her water bucket with her teeth and clanged that against the aluminum. The dents from both remain to this day, sort of a testimony to our ignorance and Tess’ love of an endless hay buffet...

Read more here:
http://enduranceintrospection.com/wp/endurance-riding-and-einstein/

Sunday, March 26, 2017

Study: Post-Exercise Snacks Benefit Horses

Thehorse.com - Full Article

By Christa Lesté-Lasserre, MA
Mar 17, 2017

Your horse just had a fabulous workout, got really sweaty, and used up a lot of energy. Now what does he want you to do?

A) Put him back in his stall or paddock and say, “Good job, Buck. Lunch’ll be ready in an hour.”
B) Load him up in the trailer and head for home, where plenty of food and water is waiting for him.
C) Feed and water him right away, and give him plenty of time to finish his food.

Read more here:
http://www.thehorse.com/articles/34350/study-post-exercise-snacks-benefit-horses?utm_source=Newsletter&utm_medium=reader-favorites&utm_campaign=03-24-2017

Saturday, March 25, 2017

4 Misconceptions About Alfalfa

Thehorse.com - Full Article

By Heather Smith Thomas
Mar 21, 2017

Despite all the science-backed suggestions about feeding alfalfa, it remains a misunderstood forage. The following are a few misconceptions worth clarifying.
Myth: An alfalfa-rich diet causes kidney problems.

“A normal, healthy horse can metabolize and excrete the extra protein in alfalfa just fine, if the horse has adequate water,” says Ray Smith, PhD, forage extension specialist at the University of Kentucky, in Lexington. Horses with kidney disease shouldn’t consume a high-protein diet (such as alfalfa), but the alfalfa itself won’t cause kidney disease...

Read more here:
http://www.thehorse.com/articles/38962/4-misconceptions-about-alfalfa?utm_source=Newsletter&utm_medium=reader-favorites&utm_campaign=03-24-2017