Friday, February 22, 2019

Great Britain: New guidance on the movement of horses and other equines in a no deal Brexit scenario

Gov.uk

The government has issued guidance for owners of equines on the preparations they need to make

Published 21 February 2019
From:
Department for Environment, Food & Rural Affairs and David Rutley MP

The Government has today issued guidance for owners of horses, ponies and other equines on the preparations they need to made in the event of a ‘no deal’ Brexit.

Leaving the EU with a deal remains the Government’s top priority. This has not changed. We are continuing with our ‘no deal’ preparations to ensure the country is prepared for every eventuality.

The guidance will help owners to navigate the new processes for moving horses and other equine animals from the UK to EU member states. This will also apply to those owners who currently move their animals between the UK, Ireland and France under the Tripartite Agreement (TPA) – an agreement relied on by many in the horseracing industry and the competition sector.

If the UK leaves the EU on 29 March without a deal:

equines travelling from the UK to the EU may need to undergo additional blood tests, which will need to be carried out within 30 days or less of travelling to satisfy EU regulations
owners will need to consult with a vet at least six weeks before they are planning to travel
all equines will need an Export Health Certificate in order to travel to EU states, instead of current documents, and will need to enter the EU via a Border Inspection Post (BIP)
some equines will also need a Government issued travel ID document, as well as their existing equine passport
The UK has already committed to allowing continued movement on all equine animals from EU member states to support the industries that rely on these animals and ahead of major horseracing events, such as the Grand National Festival at Aintree.

The government is continuing to negotiate with the European Commission on securing listed status for the UK, which would enable the continued movement of equines to EU member states.

The guidance published today is designed to give the owners of horses and other equine animals as much time to prepare for these new processes and factor in any extra travel time they may require when travelling to and from the EU.

Animal Welfare Minister David Rutley said:

Delivering a negotiated deal with the EU remains the Government’s top priority, but it is our job to responsibly ensure we are prepared for all scenarios, including no deal.

This guidance will help businesses and owners prepare for life after 29 March if we do leave without a deal. However, it is in the interest of the EU to reciprocate our commitment on the movement of horses. This will ensure horseracing and competition events across the continent can continue to be attended by all of Europe’s top equine talent.

Julian Richmond Watson, Chairman of the Thoroughbred Breeders Association, said:

The British thoroughbred racing and breeding industry welcomes publication of this important guidance and will be communicating it to our participants to help them prepare for all potential Brexit negotiation outcomes.

We fully support the Government’s welcome and pragmatic position to allow continued equine movement under current systems from EU member states to the UK in a no deal scenario.

Nick Fellows, Chief Executive of the British Equestrian Federation (BEF), said:

The BEF has worked closely with government and leading figures in equestrian sport to make sure that all horse owners have as much information as possible for when the UK leaves the European Union. It’s important to prepare for all eventualities and we’d urge all horse owners to take notice of the material provided by Defra.

If the UK is not provided with listed status by the European Commission, no movements of equines from the UK to the EU will be possible after we leave the EU until listed status is secured.

Businesses that may be affected should read the latest guidance on equine movements.

Wednesday, February 20, 2019

Presidents on Horseback

WhiteHouseHistory.org - Full Article

Military heroes who risked their lives in devotion to the nation have long been attractive presidential candidates. The image of a uniformed officer on a warhorse was a powerful symbol of leadership and executive ability. Presidents depicted in equestrian art include military heroes such as George Washington, Andrew Jackson, William Henry Harrison, Zachary Taylor, Franklin Pierce, Ulysses S. Grant, Rutherford B. Hayes, James A. Garfield, and Benjamin Harrison. Warhorses like Taylor’s Old Whitey and Grant’s Egypt and Cincinnati enjoyed honored retirement at the White House.

With the invention of photography and the popularity of illustrated magazines and newspapers in the late nineteenth century, images of the presidents posed on horseback became a staple for photojournalists. Pictures of the chief executive and their families on horseback became a familiar subject for posed photographs. President and first ladies regularly rode horses for exercise and relaxation in public both in the city parks of Washington, D.C., and on vacation. This practice changed after World War II transformed security procedures...

Read more here:
https://www.whitehousehistory.org/presidents-on-horseback?utm_medium=40digest.7days3.20190219.home&utm_source=email&utm_content=&utm_campaign=campaign

Sunday, February 17, 2019

Is Muscle Disease is Contributing to a Horse’s Poor Performance?

Thehorse.com - Full Article

Attention to certain details during exams and careful consideration of test results can help a veterinarian arrive at a diagnosis, making way for an appropriate management.

Posted by Erica Larson, News Editor | Feb 16, 2019

Lack of energy under saddle, a poor attitude during exercise, chronic back pain, hollowing over jumps. These are all possible signs of low-grade or chronic muscle disease, which can be difficult to diagnose. But one researcher reports that attention to certain details and careful consideration of test results can help a veterinarian arrive at a diagnosis, making way for an appropriate management.

At the 2018 American Association of Equine Practitioners Convention, held Dec. 2-5 in San Francisco, California, Stephanie Valberg, DVM, PhD, Dipl. ACVIM, ACVSMR, the Mary Anne McPhail Dressage Chair in Equine Sports Medicine at the Michigan State University’s College of Veterinary Medicine, in East Lansing, reviewed how she determines whether muscle disease is behind a horse’s poor performance...

Read more here:
https://thehorse.com/166342/is-muscle-disease-is-contributing-to-a-horses-poor-performance/

Thursday, February 14, 2019

Meet the 'Horse Barber' creating spectacular equine designs

Cnn.com - Full Story and photos

By Ben Church, CNN
Updated 7:55 AM ET, Tue February 12, 2019

(CNN)By combining her two passions, Melody Hames produces some of the most unexpected and spectacular designs in the equine world.
Dubbed the "Horse Barber," the design graduate has set up her own business clipping creative artwork into the hair of horses.
"They've all got a unique meaning," Hames told CNN Sport. "I've always been into art and design anyway so I love to do it..."

Read and see more at:
https://www.cnn.com/2019/02/12/sport/horse-barber-clipping-art-winning-post-spt-intl/index.html

Wednesday, February 13, 2019

ROC the Standardbred launches ambassador program

USTrottingNews.com

February 11, 2019, by Alyssa Hedges, for ROC the Standardbred

The group, founded by Alyssa Hedges in 2015, started on Facebook to connect Standardbred lovers and has since grown in size and mission. ROC the Standardbred has formed a board and applied for 501(c)3 not-for-profit recognition. The group’s primary mission is to create a market for Standardbreds as a pleasure horse and their breed ambassador program was designed to help them reach that goal.

Their 2019 lineup features 16 horse and rider teams that include the following:
• a pony-Standardbred cross to multi-million dollar winner Golden Receiver;
• horses aged 5 – 21;
• bays to greys to chestnuts;
• three blind-in-one-eye horses;
• some who raced and others who didn’t make it to the track;
• adoptees to those who never left their race family; and
• riders age 15 and up.

Teams are located throughout New York, Ohio, New Jersey, Maryland and even Canada. They will be found doing everything from barrel racing, to dressage, to hunter/jumpers, to mounted archery and even RUS. Aiming to prove just how versatile Standardbreds are, the team is excited to share the breed with the horse world. The ultimate goal is to drive up adoption rates from Standardbred rescues/transition programs and also to give those in the business alternative options for selling horses retiring from the track.

To keep up on all of the action, you can join ROC the Standardbred’s Facebook group or follow them on Instagram!

Website – www.rocthestandardbred.org
Facebook – www.facebook.com/groups/ROCtheStandardbred
Instagram – @rocthestandardbred

Tuesday, February 12, 2019

Great Britain: Rider who lost horse to Cushing’s diagnosed with the same condition

Horseandhound.co.uk - Full Article

Sarah Radford
11 February, 2019 07:06

When celebrity portrait photographer Lucy Sewill’s much-loved endurance mare had to be put down as a result of Cushing’s, she had a sudden realisation — she was suffering from the condition herself.

Horses have been part of Lucy’s life since childhood and her passion for them was reflected in her 2016 book Horses and Humans, which featured equestrian celebrities William Fox-Pitt and Chilli Morning, Kelly Marks and American Pie, Monty Roberts and Shy Boy and Dickie Waygood.

Lucy is a believer in the “special bond between horses and humans”, which she said helped her find the answer to debilitating symptoms that had plagued her for years.

“The relationships we have with our horses are so life-enhancing,” she said. ”The way animals and humans relate is extraordinary — including highlighting things that are wrong with us.”

An FEI endurance rider, Lucy had previously completed 100-mile rides with her 23-year-old Anglo-Arab Nutcracker. The mare had been enjoying a quieter life — although still “fit, athletic and active” — when she suffered a dramatic onset of symptoms...

Read more at https://www.horseandhound.co.uk/news/rider-lost-horse-cushings-diagnosed-condition-678875#AYogKjC2u6djsekE.99

Understanding Antioxidant Supplements for Horses

KER.com - Full Article

April 25, 2017
By Kentucky Equine Research Staff

Many owners offer their horses antioxidant supplements. In some cases, this might be without a solid understanding of what antioxidants do and how they benefit horses. To better appreciate how oxygen is both vital and dangerous to a horse’s body and the role antioxidants play in combating “oxidative stress,” take this short, 10-point crash course on understanding antioxidants.

1. Oxygen is 100% essential for almost all living creatures. Inhaled oxygen drives metabolic processes and helps cells produce energy.

2. In typical Jekyll and Hyde style, some oxygen molecules form damaging “reactive oxygen species” (ROS) while producing energy. These molecules are also called free radicals...

Read more here:
KER.com

Friday, February 08, 2019

Getting Properly Hitched

USRider.org - Full Article

The proper marriage of your trailer and truck revolves around understanding trailer hitches-and the important function they serve in the hauling process.

By Equus | 1/31/2019

You're considering towing your horses. One of the most confusing and scary aspects of this adventure is the myriad kinds of trailer hitches available to buy. It might seem like there are hundreds. In reality, there are only a handful, but they come in a large variety of sizes and capacities.

Of course, you want to select the right hitch, not only so it matches your trailer's coupler, but-probably most importantly-so that it has adequate capacity to safely carry the full weight of your horses and any additional loads.

Glossary of Terms
To start, let's define some terms you'll need to know to discuss hitches and towing with hitch and trailer retailers...

Read more here.

Thursday, February 07, 2019

Great Britain: Cyclist found guilty after hitting horse and rider during Windsor triathlon

Horseandhound.co.uk - Full Article and Video

Becky Murray
28 January, 2019

A cyclist has been convicted after a horse and rider were hit during a triathlon.

Iain Plumb, 32, of Chaucer Road, Crowthorne, Berkshire, was found guilty of one count of riding a cycle on a road without reasonable consideration for others following the incident which happened during the Windsor triathlon on 17 June 2018.

The rider, Jennifer Katherine, shared hat camera footage of a number of cyclists undertaking her which has receieved more than five million views. She said one of the cyslists hit her and her horse, causing him to jump sideways and pull off a hind shoe, but the cyclist did not stop...

Read more at https://www.horseandhound.co.uk/news/cyclist-found-guilty-hitting-horse-rider-windsor-triathlon-677714#HBm1q01fmgTyhM1k.99

Wednesday, February 06, 2019

Starch in Horse Diets

Thehorse.com - Full Article

Although it can be damaging if fed improperly, starch can be an important part of horse diets. Here’s what you should know.

Posted by Kristen M. Janicki, MS, PAS | Feb 4, 2019

Starch is a highly digestible energy form and can provide horses with energy they need for exercise, growth, metabolism, and other life functions. However, when fed improperly, this nonstructural carbohydrate can be detrimental to your horse’s health.

Most of the energy contained in grains, such as corn and oats, and a percentage of the energy from forage is starch. During digestion, starch is broken down primarily in the horse’s small intestine by an enzyme called amylase. This process efficiently produces glucose, a type of simple sugar essential for fueling some bodily functions.

The amount of starch consumed at one time also affects the amount of starch digested in the small intestine...

Read more here:
https://thehorse.com/118110/starch-in-horse-diets/

Tuesday, February 05, 2019

Bahrain: Amazing charm of a royal welcome at the endurance village

NewsOfBahrain.com - Full Article

SAMIRA DANOUNI
OP-ED - FEBRUARY 04, 2019

Growing up in an urban setting and amid high rise buildings, the only things I knew about horses were scenes of John Wayne riding rhythmically and at times gloriously on his black, brown or white steeds striding out in the open desert, or of Zorro’s black Tornado adroitly evading being caught. The equine characters that populated the Little House on the prairie were also a source of fascination for me as I was discovering, thanks to our television set, a world that was vastly different from mine.

I never had the chance to be physically close to horses, so although they looked recognisable enough to me and I could tell the difference between a dignified trot and a full out gallop, they remained fascinating, but mysterious creatures. My first close contact with real horses was in February 2005 when as a teacher at Bahrain School, I was amazingly lucky to be able to arrange a trip for students to the Royal Stables thanks to a kind invitation from Tawfiq Salehi, the head of the media office of HH Shaikh Nasser bin Hamad Al Khalifa.

Tawfiq, Bu Ahmed as he is called, was a real gentleman and made it effortlessly easy for us to visit the stables where we had the immense pleasure of meeting HH Shaikh Nasser and his brothers HH Shaikh Khalid and HH Shaikh Faisal, may God rest his soul in eternal peace. They took us into the world of horses, providing us with information that we all took in with great anticipation, so eager we were to comprehend the nature of these lovely, harmless and intriguing animals. The visit lasted about four hours and its effects on us were enormous...

Read more here:
http://www.newsofbahrain.com/op-ed/50895.html

Wednesday, January 30, 2019

To scratch or pat, that is the question

Wahetondailynews.com - Full Article

by Lori Ricigliano Jan 26, 2019

Have you ever wondered if your horse prefers to be scratched or patted as a reward? Well, a group of scientists in England had just that thought. The issue of patting versus scratching hadn’t been previously addressed in scientific studies, so Dr. Sara Redgate and Emily Handcock, Msc. of Nottingham Trent University in Nottingham, United Kingdom decided to see if scratching the horses’ withers (withers are located at the top of the shoulder at the base of the horse’s neck) could potentially increase horse/human bonding and act as a more effective reward. Hancock noted, “Scratching is a natural behavior among horses, whereas patting is not. Riders and handlers should be encouraged to scratch rather than pat their horses as a reward.”

To test their theory, they observed 16 horse/rider combinations at the Grand Prix Special dressage test of the 2012 Olympic games in London. Overall, patting their horse dominated any other type of non-aid given contact by the riders. The reactions of the horses indicated 34 percent of the horses displayed visible behavioral reactions, for example: speeding up their movements when they received the pats. Those that received scratching rewards stayed calmer and moved less.

The scientists then investigated the effects of patting versus wither-scratching in 10 riding school horses. In this study, the handlers patted each horse for 30 seconds four times. They then scratched their withers four times for the same time period. The team recorded heart rate and behavior on all the horses...

Read more here:
https://www.wahpetondailynews.com/community/to-scratch-or-pat-that-is-the-question/article_4a8af542-2114-11e9-96cf-87f68d6b83de.html?fbclid=IwAR0zsVziuWb_rWWS8_1dZkjeKZduewWARx2HZmOxVzbwCS0dX5d8NtXCZpo

Tuesday, January 29, 2019

5 Reasons Why Cross-Training is Good for Your Horse

FEI.org - Full Article

29 January 2019

We look at how horses can improve by trying a different discipline…

If you had to ask the top pros, most of them would tell you that cross training and a multidisciplinary focus are key to producing a great horse.

Ingrid Klimke famously advocates for pole work for dressage horses, while Jos Lansink focuses a lot on basic flatwork and transitions for his horses and riders. The eventing riders will already be aware of the benefits of training for multiple disciplines!

So if you’ve ever wondered about taking your endurance horse for a dressage lesson or blasting round the cross-country on your dressage mount, you should keep in mind these five benefits of cross-training with your horse.

1. Improved coordination

Your Dressage horse can definitely improve their coordination from doing poles or small jumps, and your jumping horse can do the same by breaking down those transitions within the pace, or by going for a hack on uneven ground.

Teaching horses to work in different ways improves their body awareness and teaches them to work different parts of their body.

Work over raised trotting poles might help a horse to articulate the joints and pick their feet up, whereas hacking over uneven terrain might help to improve a horse who tends to stumble in the arena...

Read more here:

Saturday, January 26, 2019

Chester Weber Awarded Becky Grand Hart Trophy

KER.com - Full Article

January 17, 2019
By Kentucky Equine Research Staff

KER-sponsored driver Chester Weber was presented the Becky Grand Hart Trophy at the recent Pegasus Awards ceremony, part of US Equestrian’s 2019 Annual Meeting.

The Becky Grand Hart Trophy is awarded to the best competitor of any horse or pony breed in international driving, endurance, reining, vaulting or para-equestrian competitions. Chester was recognized for his remarkable 2018 competition year, including earning an individual silver medal and leading the United States to its first-ever team gold in combined driving at the 2018 FEI World Equestrian Games™...

Read more here:
https://ker.com/equinews/chester-weber-awarded-becky-grand-hart-trophy/?utm_source=Newsletter&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=KER%20Newsletter%20012119&mc_cid=5f30330885&mc_eid=6283eb0e4a

Veterinarian, Welfare Advocate Looks Back In New Memoir ‘My Friend, The Horse’

HorsePlayUSA.com - Full Article

Equine welfare and the global monitoring of horse diseases are critical areas of concern in the horse world. But 35 years ago, when Irish veterinarian Dr. Alex Atock began his first job in regulatory veterinary medicine as a racing official, he would not have guessed that one day his lifelong affection for horses would impact how horse sports are conducted worldwide, and that his stalwart advocacy for their welfare would improve their treatment near and far.

As a pioneer of international equine health regulation and welfare for organizations such as the Federation Equestre Internationale, World Horse Welfare, the Irish Turf Club and the UAE Equestrian and Racing Federation, Alex Atock initiated programs and wrote policies still endorsed and followed by regulatory veterinarians and stewards around the world.

Atock’s role made him the top-ranking advocate for the horse on the global stage. His assignments from his employers and the racing or veterinary associations he served ranged from determining how disease outbreaks affect the movement of horses around the world, and how traveling horses may put others at risk, to affecting improvement of conditions for the sport of endurance in the United Arab Emirates, establishing the first horse inspections at international equestrian events, strategizing the welfare effects of summer heat at the 1996 Atlanta Olympic Games and many welfare and safety aspects of sports conduct that are now taken for granted.

Now retired, Atock has put away his passport, and picked up a pen...

Read more here:
http://horseplayusa.com/veterinarian-welfare-advocate-looks-back-in-new-memoir-my-friend-the-horse/

Friday, January 25, 2019

Motion Sickness, Trailer Loading Troubles, and Your Horse

Thehorse.com - Full Article

Could motion sickness make a horse reluctant to load and cause him to scramble in the trailer? Find out what the research says.

Posted by Robin Foster, PhD, CHBC, Cert. AAB, IAABC | Jan 24, 2019

Q.My 11-year-old gelding is somewhat high strung and becomes nervous when hauled. I would like help in managing his nervousness, especially when trailering and, of course, safety is important! In the four years I’ve owned him, we’ve worked with various trainers and he is easier to load, but still scrambles constantly and lathers with sweat when hauled, even over short distances. I think he might have motion sickness. Do horses get motion sickness and what can I do?

A.Some horses do suffer from motion sickness, but not much is known about it or how common it is...

Read more here:
https://thehorse.com/165668/motion-sickness-trailer-loading-troubles-and-your-horse/

Thursday, January 24, 2019

7 Things you may not have known about DMSO

EquusMagazine.com - Full Article

This odiferous compound has become a common treatment for a variety of inflammatory conditions. Here are a few interesting facts about DMSO's history and action.

CHRISTINE BARAKATJAN 17, 2019

Two decades ago, if you mentioned dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) around the barn you may have gotten puzzled looks in response. Back then, this industrial solvent turned anti- inflammatory therapy was relatively new to the horse world, and even if people had heard of it they viewed it as an unusual or even mysterious option.Since then, DMSO has gone mainstream. It is approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for topical use on horses, but veterinarians regularly use the chemical “off-label” in other ways to treat a wide array of inflammatory conditions, from laminitis to neurological problems. When the DMSO’s distinctive garlicky smell wafts through the barn these days, people are more likely to nod knowingly than wonder what’s going on.

Nonetheless, DMSO is a little like aspirin---something that many people use without necessarily thinking too much about how it works. But learning more about DMSO may help you appreciate how it can be useful in maintaining your horse’s health and comfort. So here are seven things you might not know about DMSO...

Read more here:
https://equusmagazine.com/diseases/seven-things-about-dmso

Tuesday, January 22, 2019

Dealing with Fear on the Trail

Traimeister.com - Full Article

August 29 2018

One year ago (August 26th, 2017 to be exact) I discovered gravity in Central Oregon. I was riding in the Three Sisters Wilderness and feeling terribly comfortable and confident. One minute I was busy taking pictures of an outstandingly beautiful area. The next I was in a Bend, OR Emergency Room with some pretty grim news. The assortment of bones in my shoulder were newly arranged and had numerous additional pieces floating around. It wasn’t pleasant.

Fast forward a few months and past the worst of narcotics to when I first tried to get back on my mule Ruger. After awkwardly clambering aboard with an oddly wonky arm I realized that was nothing between me and ground but the same animal that I had been on during my accident. The comfortable and confident feelings were long gone. The next moment I was nearly unable to move. This was my first experience of being walloped by so severe a fear reaction. The anxiety lingered even after I got back on the ground.

Fear is a neurophysiological response to a threat, real or perceived. It activates our fight-or-flight response by stimulating the hypothalamus, which in turn directs the sympathetic nervous system and the adrenal-cortical system preparing our bodies for danger. This can happen suddenly or we can experience a slow drip of anxiety that creeps up on us as dread. We inherited this “survival circuitry” from our hunter-gatherer ancestors. Those who developed it were better able to survive having to wrestle a bear or run from a pack of wolves. During an encounter with fear, blood is shunted from our limbs so it’s more available to our hearts. Our breathing and heart rates increase; we sweat or shiver; our stomach “drops” and our vision narrows as our bodies prepare to flee or freeze. As much as we might like to eradicate this disabling feeling from our lives, fear is a central part of us. We might as well accept it. But how?...

Read more here:
https://www.trailmeister.com/dealing-with-fear-on-the-trail/

Monday, January 21, 2019

In which the reason that God made winter is discussed: a book review

Haikufarm blog - Full Review

by Aarene Storms
January 20, 2019

I don't buy many books.
I borrowed this one from the library...but after reading it,
I plan to order a copy of my own. It's that good.


Denny Emerson's name may be familiar to readers because he's a famous 3-Day Event rider.

Others may know him because of his extensive endurance career.

He's has been riding horses longer than most readers of this blog have been alive. To hear him tell it, he's learned a few things along the way.

What I liked about this book:

Read more here:
https://haikufarm.blogspot.com/2019/01/in-which-reason-that-god-made-winter-is.html

Saturday, January 19, 2019

What your horse's hair whirls and whorls may mean

Equusmagazine.com - Full Article

Research shows that the direction of a horse's "cowlicks" provides clues to how he will behave when he spooks.
MICK MCCLUSKEY, BVSC, MACVSCJAN 11, 2019

New research suggests there’s a surprisingly simple way of predicting whether a spooking horse will turn to the right or left: Check out his facial whorls.

The equivalent of “cowlicks” in people, whorls are swirling patterns of hair; they are commonly seen on the forehead but can appear anywhere on a horse’s coat. The location and direction of whorls in humans are linked to early fetal brain development. In fact, abnormal whorls are common in children with developmental disorders...

Read more here:
https://equusmagazine.com/horse-world/whirls-hair-whorls-54193

Wednesday, January 16, 2019

Shoeing the Low-Heeled Horse

Thehorse.com - Full Article

Some effects of the shoeing strategies farriers use to correct low heels in horses can actually be detrimental in the long run. Here’s how one farrier recommends correcting this frustrating lameness cause.

Posted by Alexandra Beckstett, The Horse Managing Editor | Oct 31, 2018

Low heels, also called underrun or collapsed heels, can be a frustrating cause of lameness in horses. Further, the effects of the shoeing strategies used to correct them can actually be detrimental in the long run.

So Simon Curtis, FWCF, BSc(Hons), PhD, HonAssocRCVS, an award-winning farrier based in Newmarket, Suffolk, U.K., proposed a long-term solution to the issue at the 2018 British Equine Veterinary Association Congress, held Sept. 12-15 in Birmingham, U.K.

While the terms low and underrun are often used interchangeably when describing horses’ hooves, they do differ.

“A low-heeled horse is one where the digit has a low angle but aligned hoof-pastern axis (HPA, how the front hoof wall aligns with the pastern) and the caudal (rear) hoof wall is not bent,” Curtis explained. “Underrun heels are associated with a negative HPA (when the pastern angle is steeper than the hoof wall) and are long and folded under the solar hoof capsule...”

Read more here:
https://thehorse.com/162245/shoeing-the-low-heeled-horse/

Tuesday, January 15, 2019

How Much Hay To Feed Horses: Where To Begin

KER.com - Full Article

September 13, 2018
By Kentucky Equine Research Staff

Horses thrive on diets rife with forages, whether it is a medley of pasture grasses, baled hay, or another forage product, such as hay cubes, hay pellets, or haylage. They are capable of processing huge quantities of forage to meet their nutritional demands, but where does a horse owner start in determining how much forage to feed?

An estimate can be made based on the horse’s age, body weight, and physiologic state. Here’s a quick reference table to illustrate expected forage consumption by horses...

Read more here:
https://ker.com/equinews/much-hay-feed-horses-begin/?utm_source=KER+Newsletter&utm_campaign=1686f16575-Focus_Jan19_Forage&utm_medium=email&utm_term=0_0d95781dfc-1686f16575-11166&mc_cid=1686f16575&mc_eid=6283eb0e4a

Monday, January 14, 2019

Female Ranchers Are Reclaiming the American West

NYTimes.com - Full Article

As men leave animal agriculture for less gritty work, more ranches are being led by women — with new ideas about technology, ecology and the land.


Photographs by Amanda Lucier
Written by Amy Chozick

Jan. 11, 2019

Hundreds of years before John Wayne and Gary Cooper gave us a Hollywood version of the American West, with men as the brute, weather-beaten stewards of the land, female ranchers roamed the frontier. They were the indigenous, Navajo, Cheyenne and other tribes, and Spanish-Mexican rancheras, who tended and tamed vast fields, traversed rugged landscapes with their dogs, hunted, and raised livestock.

The descendants of European settlers brought with them ideas about the roles of men and women, and for decades, family farms and ranches were handed down to men. Now, as mechanization and technology transform the ranching industry, making the job of cowboy less about physical strength — though female ranchers have that in spades — and more about business, animal husbandry and the environment, women have reclaimed their connection to the land...

Read more here:
https://www.nytimes.com/2019/01/11/business/women-ranchers-american-west-photo-essay.html

Sunday, January 13, 2019

Must Have Items for Trail Rides

Traiilmeister.com - Full Article

by Robert Eversole

What Do You Rely on When the Day Goes Downhill?

As published by Western Mule Magazine Nov, 2104

My failure to look at a calendar recently resulted in the good fortune of meeting a fellow Western Mule reader, Mr. John H. of the Spokane, Washington area. John is the President of the North Idaho Saddle Mule Club, an all around good guy and a real backcountry resource who teaches the art of survival to military personnel. He’s the real deal.

I had pulled into the location where my Backcountry Horsemen Chapter holds its monthly meetings. That I didn’t recognize many of the faces that were milling about didn’t phase me since I’m not a regular at our gatherings; after all I’d rather be riding. Well I must have looked out of place and John greeted me with “Are you here for the Mule Club?” Well, Mrs. Eversole raised me to always look for the positive and the Mule Club was having a potluck so I stayed!

A few days later John and I ran into each other again and like riders around the world we started talking about some of our various trips. The conversation soon veered towards tales of trail accidents, what riders can do to prepare for these “just in case” situations, and the sad fact that most riders don’t prepare at all.

Even an easy front country “just a day ride” can very quickly turn into a nightmare should the unthinkable happen. If you’re injured and come off your mount how you’ve prepared for the unexpected can well make the difference between an inconvenience and far worse.

The core of these preparations is often referred to as the Ten Essentials that you should never leave the trailhead without. That means never. Ever. The couple of pounds that these essentials represent are not “extra” they are critical. I see many riders who have heard of this concept but still fail to head the advice. Why not? I think a lot of it is the “it won’t happen to me” syndrome. Well, maybe it won’t but are you willing to bet your life on fair skies and no accidents? I’m not...

Read more here:
https://www.trailmeister.com/must-have-items-for-day-rides-western-mule-nov-2014/

Friday, January 11, 2019

4 easy ways to ice-proof your horse's hooves

Equus.com - Full Article

The rock-hard accumulations of ice and snow that can get packed into a horse’s feet can cause lameness and injury. Here’s how to keep hoof ice balls from forming.


MELINDA FRECKLETON, DVM, WITH CHRISTINE BARAKAT
JAN 4, 2019

One winter hazard that riders in northern climes know well is ice balls. When snow and ice get packed under a horse’s hoof, it warms up slightly against the sole, then freezes readily against the cold metal of the shoe. The ice can quickly build up until the horse is walking on a hard, solid mass of frozen material, called “ice balls” or “snowballs.” The wetter and more dense the snow, the more likely it is that snowballs will occur. “Slushier” ice will fall away from the foot more readily, and light, dry snow won’t pack well, but wet or icy snow can easily get compacted into a tight, hard block.

Walking on the uneven mass even for a short time can cause a number of problems from tripping and sliding to strains or sprains of the muscles, tendons and joints. Persistent snowballs can lead to bruises and hoof cracks. Horses do OK much of the
time when there is snow all around, but once on a firm surface, many will teeter as if they are on high-heeled shoes.

Removing large masses of ice from under your horse’s feet can be difficult, and by the time you discover them, the damage may already be underway. It’s better to take measures to prevent them from forming:...

Read more here:
https://equusmagazine.com/management/prevent-ice-balls?utm_source=EQUUSNL&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=Newsletter&_hsenc=p2ANqtz-9pT6YWtxDhpUGB2ziKvTD7hYNECD3B0GI8pH2jC7AtSpdiWDaYdl9l696nJXPQV84xwt3gg88zafS1DphapwBlBJzhQA&_hsmi=68843624