Saturday, October 19, 2019

Preparing a Truck for Towing

Trailmeister.com - Full Article

September 29, 2019

PREPARING A TRUCK FOR TOWING – Setting up a new truck for safe trailer towing

I got a new to me truck! She’s a 2019 Ford F450, diesel, 4×4 crew cab, long bed, and I’m finding out that much of the equipment from my old truck (2008 Ford F350, diesel, short bed) doesn’t swap over to the new vehicle. Even with all the factory installed towing options I’ve learned that there’s a lot more to preparing a truck for towing than pulling out of the dealership and hitching up. My animals are depending upon me getting this right for the many trips we have planned!

My initial Challenges:

New truck came with a factory gooseneck package. The ball may be removable (via a nasty greasy latch on top of the ball) but neither it nor the factory safety chain loops inspired confidence.

• With the trailer attached I cannot open the tailgate. It hits the trailer jack’s hydraulic pump housing. This was not a problem before but the new tailgate is a fraction taller than the old. I’d like to be able to drop the tailgate to load and unload hay and water when still connected to the trailer.
• The new truck’s rear bumper pull hitch receiver is much larger than that on the old truck. (3 inch square vs 2 inch).

What I thought were 3 easy questions soon turned into a rabbit hole of new queries and concerns, and the thought of messing it up was keeping me up at night. I’m not a truck guy, and have never been mechanically inclined, so I started searching for answers from experts. Real experts in the field, not the keyboard warriors you find across the internet. My investigations led me to Beth Barlow of B&W Trailer Hitches in Kansas. Beth was able to help me sort through the most important considerations for my situation...

Read more here:
https://www.trailmeister.com/preparing-a-truck-for-towing/?utm_source=MailingList&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=October+2019+general

Friday, October 18, 2019

Horse Manure on the Trails: Should we do something?

ELCR.org - Full Article

Horses have been a critical part of human progress from the early days of our history. They have carried men and supplies in times of war and peace, pulled the plows of farmers’ fields and were the main source of transportation during the settlement of the American west. Horses were the backbone of farms, the transportation to town for supplies and social activities, and a family necessity. Historically, many trails were created by horses ridden by people who needed to get from point A to point B. Today those trails are a critical part of recreation in open spaces and parks. Over the decades, the role of horses in daily life greatly diminished in both importance and numbers. As a result, horses are little understood by modern community members, especially trail users.

The modern horse is generally confined to a barn or small (5 acres or less) pasture area. They are mostly used for pleasure riding, showing, racing and the like. A few modern horses are working horses, and most of those are used in ranching and the production and management of other livestock. Many horses retire from ‘work careers’ to become pleasure and trail horses.

The Rise of Trail User Conflicts

A decrease in the number of boarding stables in or near urban areas, and community planning and zoning ordinances that place farms further away from urban areas place the typical trail user, or for that matter, equine enthusiast, far from any horse facility. Thislack of accessto horses creates a situation where many trail users have no experience with them. The number of horses on the trails has rapidly diminished in the last 100 years while the number of hikers and bike riders has increased exponentially. This has created the potential for conflict between the user groups. For example, hikers and equestrians don’t like fast bikes, mountain bikers want the challenge of single-track trails, and everyone wants to be out in open space enjoying the day. And no one wants to be told that they can’t be there, or they aren’t welcome...

Read more here:
https://elcr.org/wp-content/uploads/2019/06/Horse-Manure-on-the-Trails-by-Lyndall-Erb2-2019-002.pdf

Heart Horses - Ashley Wingert

GoPony.me - Full Story

September 27, 2019 / Ashley Wingert

I think anyone who has been around horses for any length of time has heard the term “heart horse.” That special horse with whom you share a special bond, an almost indescribable feeling you get when you’re around them.

I found the above video yesterday, courtesy of my Facebook feed, and I couldn’t help but tear up as I watched it. I love some of the descriptions they use…how they are “…the horse that brings out the best in you…not only teaches you to be a better rider, but a better person.”

I’d never quite heard it put into words that way, but I think that describes it really well. I can say I’ve learned something from every horse I’ve ridden, and there are very few times I’ve ever regretted climbing into the saddle…but those heart horses…they’re something special.

I got very, very lucky: my first horse is one of my heart horses. Not too many people are that fortunate right off the bat to end up with a lifetime heart horse that they keep for a couple decades and counting. Granted, I spent several years of riding lesson horses before I ever got Mimi, but some of those lesson horses did their best to try to dissuade a small, horse-crazy child from further pursuing her passion...

Read more here:
https://gopony.me/2019/09/27/heart-horses/

Thursday, October 17, 2019

‘Havoc’ From Wild Horses Is Top Issue for Trump Lands Chief

News.bloombergenvironment.com - Full Article

October 11 2019
by Emily C. Dooley

• More than 88,000 wild horses, burros represent ‘existential threat’ to land
• William Perry Pendley also overseeing BLM move to Colorado from Washington, D.C.

The biggest challenge facing public lands is the more than 88,000 free-roaming wild horses and burros on nearly 27 million acres of Bureau of Land Management property, a top Trump administration official said Oct. 11.

Acting BLM Director William Perry Pendley said the destruction and devastation created by the descendants of animals used by Spanish explorers, the U.S. cavalry, and others costs the federal government millions of dollars each year.

He called the horses and burros “an existential threat to these lands.”

Pendley spoke as part of a panel on public lands during the Society of Environmental Journalists annual meeting in Fort Collins, Colo. He replaced Interior Secretary David Bernhardt, who had a scheduling conflict, during a morning session.

Other panelists said climate change was the biggest threat, but Pendley said he was most concerned by roaming animals, which the agency routinely auctions off. More than 11,000 horses and burros were removed in 2018...

Read more here:
https://news.bloombergenvironment.com/environment-and-energy/drilling-ban-on-federal-lands-insane-trump-land-head-says

Monday, October 14, 2019

Bicyclist Rides Entire Pony Express Trail Alone

Fox40.com - Full Article

POSTED 11:09 AM, OCTOBER 13, 2019, BY ASSOCIATED PRESS,

RENO, Nev. (AP) — Jan Bennett endured food poisoning, hail and near misses with tornado weather on her solo bicycle ride across the entire 2,220-mile (3,572-kilometer) Pony Express Trail from St. Joseph, Missouri, to Sacramento, California.

The former cycling road racer from Dallas, who made the trip as part of her effort to map out a bike-packing route along the historic trail knew it wouldn’t be easy.

But she wasn’t fully prepared for her toughest challenge yet in a remote piece of terrain in northern Nevada, where the climb was too steep and rough to ride and water was scarce.

More than 1,700 miles (2,735 kilometers) into the ride out of Missouri last year, she realized just how alone she was in a canyon north of Eureka.

“It was a little bit of a gut check,” Bennett told the Reno Gazette Journal in a recent interview.

“It is in the middle of a really remote section of route,” she said. “I had the moment of, ‘If something happens out here, I am kind of screwed’.”

As she slowly pushed her bike up the steep incline, she remembered an old piece of advice about endurance riding.

“If you have to cry, cry while you are moving,” Bennett said. “If you cry on the side of the road you still have to get up and cover that area...”

Read more here:
https://fox40.com/2019/10/13/bicyclist-rides-entire-pony-express-trail-alone/

Thursday, October 10, 2019

Nick Bondarev Introduces Us to the Eagle Hunters of Mongolia

ThePhoblographer.com - Story and photos

09. Oct. 2019

One of the most fascinating topics to explore in documentary photography is how people have retained their traditional culture and way of life. Tribes and ethnic groups are perfect for these, as we’ve previously seen in projects that covered the Toda Tribe of the Nilgiris, the Brokpa Tribe of the Himalayas, the Ladakh locals of India, and the Tengger group of Java, Indonesia. This time, we take a peek into the life of the Kazakh eagle hunters of Mongolia, who keep this fascinating, age-old practice alive to this day.

According to a BBC travel story, the art of berkutchi has been around for 6,000 years, among the best-known practitioners being Genghis Khan and Kublai Khan who both kept thousands of hunting birds. The ethnic Kazakhs of today continue to hunt with the aid of eagles as part of their way of life, which is very different and detached from the modern world. They continue to tame and train eagles for hunting on horseback and live off the grid in portable round tents called gers..

More photos and story here:
https://www.thephoblographer.com/2019/10/09/nick-bondarev-introduces-us-to-the-eagle-hunters-of-mongolia/

Wednesday, October 09, 2019

New Equestrian Podcast Released

September 28 2019

The Equestrian Pulse Podcast is a new show from equestrian bloggers discussing current topics in the horse world. This podcast was founded by three international bloggers Heather Wallace of The Timid Rider (USA), Andrea Parker of The Sand Arena Ballerina (AUS) and Louise Dando of In Due Horse (UK/FRA) to discuss a wide variety of topics including confidence, horsemanship, health, and trending events important to horse lovers across all disciplines.

Heather Wallace of The Timid Rider is a returning adult equestrian, equine sports massage therapist, and author writing about confidence in and out of the saddle. Andrea Parker of The Sand Arena Ballerina is a dressage rider and dietician based in Queensland, Australia. Louise Dando writes In Due Horse, a horse girl’s lifestyle blog. She is a Brit now based in France talking about all things horsey.

Upcoming episodes include an interview with Raquel Lynn of Horses & Heels and Stable Style, Challenging Yourself in and Out of the Saddle, Beginning Clicker Training, Tips on Moving to a New Barn, and much more.

Are you interested in being interviewed? Please complete the form and you may be contacted to appear on the podcast. Sponsorship opportunities are available as well as product reviews and sponsored blog posts. Please inquire for details to equestrianpulse@gmail.com.


About the Equestrian Pulse Podcast

The Equestrian Pulse Podcast takes the pulse of the global equestrian community. A podcast by international bloggers Heather Wallace (The Timid Rider), Andrea Parker (The Sand Arena Ballerina), and Louise Dando (In Due Horse) to discuss and interview brands and equestrians regarding nutrition and fitness, trends, horsemanship, and confidence amongst all disciplines. Listen on Buzzsprout, Apple Podcasts, Google Podcasts, Spotify, and iHeartRadio. Follow us on Instagram @equestrianpulse and Facebook @equestrianpulsepodcast.

The battle over wild horses

washingtonpost.com - Full Article

Ranchers and animal advocates finally made peace. But critics call it a betrayal.

By Karin Brulliard
September 18, 2019

ELKO COUNTY, Nev. — Wild horses may be symbols of the wide-open American West, but J.J. Goicoechea watched them warily. Under a bright desert sky, about 20 mustangs munched on the crested wheatgrass meant for the Angus cattle he grazes here on public land.

“You’ve got to look up to them. They’re tough,” the fourth-generation rancher said, leaning against his dusty red truck. “But if we turn a blind eye, in five years there will be 100 horses here, and it won’t look as good.”

Goicoechea has long been on one side of the battle over wild horses and burros, an issue so contentious that Congress, animal advocates, conservationists, ranchers and the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) have long been in a stalemate. Everyone agrees the situation is untenable: The government says three times more equines roam public land than the fragile terrain can handle. To address this, the BLM, which is charged with managing most of the animals, periodically rounds up horses and now has nearly 50,000 in holding. The agency says caring for the warehoused animals devours most of its wild horse budget, leaving little for other approaches.

Horse advocates call the roundups cruel, contend that millions of cattle do vastly more damage to public lands than thousands of horses, and insist mustangs must never be killed. Ranchers and some environmentalists view the horses as feral pests that damage ecosystems, compete for resources with cattle and wildlife and should be culled or sold...

Read more here:
https://www.washingtonpost.com/science/2019/09/18/wild-horses-have-long-kicked-up-controversy-now-foes-say-they-have-solution/?arc404=true&utm_campaign=26d6e1c183-EMAIL_CAMPAIGN_2019_09_19_03_28&utm_medium=email&utm_source=1500%20CWP%20List%20Daily%20Clips%20and%20Updates

Friday, October 04, 2019

Bert the Bear Horse

HorseNetwork.com - Full Story

CAELAN BEARD
September 30 2019

One of the questions I get asked most often is if I have any bear spray in my saddlebags.
The answer is no: in part because it’d be hard to spray a bear from horseback without it getting in my horse’s face and eyes, and in part because I don’t need it. My horse, Bert, scares away the bears for me.

For the past three summers that I’ve been a horseback trail guide in Jasper, Alberta, I’ve been riding Bert, my guide horse, every single day. We typically ride about three to five hours a day, six days a week; all together, I spend more time with him over the course of the summer than any other single being. You could say we know each other pretty well by now. A sure-footed chestnut Quarter Horse, standing at 15.3 hands high, he’s the most solid partner I could have ever asked for...

Read more here:
https://horsenetwork.com/2019/09/bert-the-bear-horse/?utm_source=MASTER&utm_campaign=236b1055a1-HNS_2019_10_3_19&utm_medium=email&utm_term=0_5694ca6b0c-236b1055a1-84641243&goal=0_5694ca6b0c-236b1055a1-84641243&mc_cid=236b1055a1&mc_eid=b3c9897994

Wednesday, October 02, 2019

Just Bad Luck or Bad Decisions? A 2019 Tevis Cup Wrap-Up with Personal Perspective and Analysis

Easycare Blog - Full Story

By Christoph Schork - September 26, 2019

Like a yearly ritual, I have completed my Tevis Checklist:

• Horse is optimally conditioned and prepared for the most difficult 100 Miler in the world.
• Horse has completed other 100 milers, or back-to-back 50 milers, and is sound and fit.
• EasyCare Hoof Boots applied with diligence.
• Saddle fit and all tack adjusted and checked.
• All supplement and electrolyte containers filled.
• Assortment of different hay types and various different grain feeds prepared.
• Crews organized and briefed.
• Ride plan rehearsed.

Did I overlook anything? It all seems good. Will the Tevis gremlins stay put this year?

We arrived at Robie Equestrian Park in Truckee, California, the Wednesday before the 2019 Tevis Cup 100-Miles-One-Day Trail Ride. Global Endurance Training Center started three horses at this yearʼs Tevis. All of them passed their veterinary pre-check. They were all well hydrated, properly fed, and eager to start...

Read more here:
https://blog.easycareinc.com/just-bad-luck-or-bad-decisions-a-2019-tevis-cup-wrap-up-with-personal-perspective-and-analysis/

Saturday, September 28, 2019

U.S. Senate Committee Maintains Ban on Horse Slaughter in the U.S.

September 29 2019

Legislation Would Keep Horse Slaughter Plants Closed in the U.S.

WASHINGTON, D.C. – Today, the U.S. Senate Appropriations Committee included a provision in the FY2020 Agriculture Appropriations bill to maintain the ban on slaughtering horses in the U.S, thanks to Senators Lindsay Graham (R-SC), Tom Udall (D-NM), and Susan Collins (R-ME), all longtime leaders on the issue. The language bars the use of taxpayer dollars for horse slaughter inspections, which effectively prevents the plants from operating. Similar language was included in the House FY20 Agriculture Appropriations bill in June and is expected to be included in any final spending bill passed by Congress.

“Horses are our dutiful companions and partners in work and sport – not a meal. They have loyally stood by us as we built this country together, and they deserve better than to be brutally slaughtered,” said Holly Gann, director of federal affairs at Animal Wellness Action. “Horse slaughter is animal cruelty, and taxpayers shouldn’t be forced to foot the bill for it.”

Horse slaughter plants previously operated in the U.S. until 2007 and shipped the meat overseas to foreign countries for human consumption. It is a cruel and torturous process for the horses who become victims of this predatory industry; many are severely injured during transport to horse slaughter plants and some horses are even slaughtered while conscious.

Because the horsemeat is utilized for human consumption, horse slaughter plants cannot operate in the U.S. if inspections are defunded. The language to defund horse slaughter has been maintained in most yearly spending bills to keep plants shuttered, thanks to the tireless work of advocates to elevate this issue in Congress; however, it is not a permanent solution – Congress must reconsider the issue yearly.


Animal Wellness Action (Action) is a Washington, D.C.-based 501(c)(4) organization with a mission of helping animals by promoting legal standards forbidding cruelty. We champion causes that alleviate the suffering of companion animals, farm animals, and wildlife. We advocate for policies to stop dogfighting and cockfighting and other forms of malicious cruelty and to confront factory farming and other systemic forms of animal exploitation. To prevent cruelty, we promote enacting good public policies and we work to enforce those policies. To enact good laws, we must elect good lawmakers, and that’s why we remind voters which candidates care about our issues and which ones don’t. We believe helping animals helps us all.


Friday, September 27, 2019

15 is the New 10: Keeping the Middle-Aged Horse Healthy

TheHorse.com - Full Article

Find out how to keep your middle-aged horse’s teeth, feet, joints, and more healthy.

Posted by Nancy S. Loving, DVM | Sep 15, 2019

Tornado Alley was Emily Brogna’s first horse. The near-black American Saddlebred mare took her young owner from beginner rider to show ring champion and secured a forever spot in Emily’s heart and family. At 13, her saddleseat park pleasure days are now behind her, but she continues to live an active lifestyle as Emily’s trail horse.

Like many middle-aged horses, Tornado Alley falls neither in the young nor the senior horse health care category. She’s no spring chicken, but she also doesn’t deserve to be labeled old quite yet. That would seem downright insulting!

What so many teenage horses like her need are management and health care strategies that will help them remain active and healthy well into their golden years.

Jay Altman, DVM, of Equine Medical Service, in Ft. Collins, Colorado, believes dental care, nutrition, and parasite control are the areas where owners and veterinarians can have the biggest impact on middle-aged horses. In this article we’ll take a closer look at these horse health aspects and more...

Read more here:
https://thehorse.com/18182/15-is-the-new-10-keeping-the-middle-aged-horse-healthy/?utm_source=Newsletter&utm_medium=Lameness+enews

Thursday, September 26, 2019

Convention Hall once hosted dog and Pony Express races — A look back at Atlantic County history

Pressofatlanticcity.com - Full Article

By JERRY GORDON For The Current
September 26 2019

(Look Back is an occasional series with content and images from the Atlantic County Historical Society.)

Until recently, if you wanted to watch and gamble on the greyhound races, it meant being in Florida where you had your choice of the horse races, jai-alai, or the magnificent greyhounds. But back in the 1930s and '40s, all you had to do was go to Convention Hall and pay a general admission fee of 40¢ or go big time in the clubhouse for the grand rate of $1.50 and you could enjoy yourself while watching the greyhounds chase a rabbit around the track.

The Atlantic Kennel Club signed a three month lease with Convention Hall for $165,000 rental with $50,000 paid in advance. It was announced that 600 dogs would be arriving from Florida for the local meets whose season began on June 28 and lasted until Sept. 9.

The ads for the races touted the "Peer of amusements in Atlantic City is at the auditorium where you can see the World's Fastest Greyhounds on a regulation course." Some of the weekly specials included Monkey Races, Hurdle Races, and the Margate Cup Races. Ten races were scheduled each evening with an 8:15 p.m. post time.

In addition to the dog races, more than 100 horses were brought here for the American Pony Express endurance races held each year...

Read more here:
https://www.pressofatlanticcity.com/currents_gazettes/brigantine/convention-hall-once-hosted-dog-and-pony-express-races-a/article_fc0c0a0c-9272-594c-bf89-7af34dc72960.html

The dangerous mosquito-borne virus EEE that has killed 5 people is present in Wisconsin, officials say

JSOnline.com - Full Article

Joe Taschler, Milwaukee Journal Sentinel
Published 10:54 a.m. CT Sept. 18, 2019

A dangerous and often deadly version of mosquito-borne encephalitis that has flared across a number of states including Michigan this summer is already present in Wisconsin, according to state officials.

Known as Eastern equine encephalitis, or EEE, the virus has infected people in Michigan, Massachusetts and Rhode Island. At least five people have died after contracting the infection.

In an average year, there are only seven human cases of EEE in the entire country, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. But this year, Michigan and Massachusetts each have at least that many cases under investigation.

Three Michigan residents have died from the rare virus and four others have been sickened by the disease, state health officials there said Tuesday, amid that state's biggest outbreak of EEE in more than a decade. The three people who died were all adults...

Read more here:
https://www.jsonline.com/story/news/local/wisconsin/2019/09/18/eee-dangerous-form-mosquito-borne-encephalitis-found-wisconsin/2362247001/

Tuesday, September 24, 2019

How to Back a Trailer - Dr Mel Newton

MelNewton.com - Full Article

March 28, 2017 Posted by Melinda Newton

Backing a trailer is an essential skill as I was reminded over and over and OVER this year. Whether you have to put your trailer into a back-in only angled parking spot at the barn, make a “U” turn at a T intersection, navigate a tight ride camp, or turn around in your best friends driveway – knowing how to back a trailer is something you can’t afford to put off any longer.

There is 1 simple trick and 2 skills you need to master NOW.

I’m not going to lie. Certain truck/trailer combinations are easier to back and maneuver than others. My standard-cab long bed pick up + trailer was an absolute dream and I could wiggle my three-horse ANYWHERE. The Dodge MEGA cab 4 door turns-like-a-cruise-liner truck paired with any size trailer is an exercise in patience and near misses as I constantly mis-judge the semi-truck like room it needs to maneuver. BUT, the concepts are exactly the same...

Read here for the trick:
https://melnewton.com/2017/how-to-back-a-trailer/

Monday, September 16, 2019

Fortified Concentrate Feed Found to Improve Horses’ Toplines

Thehorse.com - Full Article

Owners who struggle to provide their horses with consistently good-quality forage might be able to improve feed digestibility and topline development by offering these horses a fortified feed, researchers find.

Posted by Alexandra Beckstett, The Horse Managing Editor | Sep 7, 2019

Owners who struggle to provide their horses with consistently good-quality forage might be able to improve feed digestibility and topline development by offering these horses a fortified feed.

Texas A&M University graduate student Mattea Much recently tested this theory and presented her findings at the 2019 Equine Science Society Symposium, held June 3-6 in Asheville, North Carolina.

Much fed 23 stock-type mares either a control diet, consisting of a custom pelleted concentrate (13 mares), or a treatment diet (10 mares), consisting of a pelleted feed fortified with amino acids and trace minerals (SafeChoice senior). The mares received two concentrate meals per day and free-choice Bermuda grass hay...

Read more here:
https://thehorse.com/178414/fortified-concentrate-feed-found-to-improve-horses-toplines/

Friday, September 13, 2019

Make-up of one gene points to racing success of Arabian horses, say reseachers

Horsetalk.co.nz - Full Article

September 13, 2019 Horsetalk.co.nz

Variations within a particular gene in Arabian horses show potential as an indicator of race performance, according to researchers.

Arabian horses are among the oldest and most popular horse breeds in the world, recognised for their athleticism and stamina.

The breed is commonly used in the discipline of Endurance. However, in some countries, 2 to 5-year-olds are introduced to flat race training and often compete in at least one racing season before achieving maturity and undergoing endurance training.

During intensive training, the rates of lactate production and use are critical to avoid muscle fatigue, resulting in a decrease in exercise performance...

Read more at:
https://www.horsetalk.co.nz/2019/09/13/one-gene-racing-success-arabian-horses/

Horses Sans Shoes: The Facts on Bare Feet

TheHorse.com - Full Article

The science of the equine foot is like the hoof itself–expanding and contracting, getting shaped and trimmed. Find out what researchers are learning about the biomechanics of the barefoot hoof.

Posted by Christa Lesté-Lasserre, MA | Sep 11, 2019

What researchers know about the biomechanics of the barefoot hoof
It looks like an ultra-resistant all-weather block, with a shiny, marblelike surface that can trick us into thinking it’s indestructible. Its sharply defined edges give us the impression that it’s as solid as stone—especially when they land with full force on one of our own feet. And its “clip clop” sound striking against hard surfaces betray it as a dense support structure that works like a steel foundation under massive forces.

In reality, though, the equine foot isn’t like this at all.

The foot—or, essentially, the one long toe—is a complex structure filled with bones, tendons, ligaments, arteries, veins, nerves, cartilage, joint fluid, and more. Far from being inert, it’s alive and very active, communicating sensory information, pumping blood, and articulating, contracting, and flexing over ground. And if it’s unshod, it’s constantly changing shape as the horse uses it, instantaneously as well as over time...

Read more here:
https://thehorse.com/160548/horses-sans-shoes-the-facts-on-bare-feet/

Mil's Life - a Real Life Urban Cowboy

FEI.org - Full Article

14 September 2019
Words by Hannah Spreckley

An award-winning documentary tells the true story of how horses changed a young man's life in inner-city Philadelphia...

With the backdrop of the grimy streets of North Philadelphia, a man on a horse strides into focus – setting the scene for a superb short documentary about the close relationship formed between a man and his horse

‘Mil's Life’ is the story of 26-year-old urban cowboy and native Philadelphian, Jamil ‘Mil’ Pratis, and how these animals, specifically his one-eyed horse Dusty, have had a major effect on changing the course of his life.

The 25-minute documentary focuses on Mil's passion for horses in an unusual setting. If you thought that equestrian sport was only ever for the wealthy and privileged, this will change your view! Set amongst the poverty and urban decay of North Philly, where gangs and drugs are rife, Mil’s Life is an almost unbelievable story of how one young man’s life was altered by the Fletcher Street Riding Club...

Read more here:
https://www.fei.org/stories/mils-life-real-life-urban-cowboy

Horse Boarding: Legal Rights and Responsibilities

EquineLegalSolutions.com - Full Article

At Equine Legal Solutions, we receive a lot of calls from horse owners and boarding stables that are unhappy with a situation and want to know what their legal rights are. In the four states where we practice, California, New York, Oregon and Washington, there are no laws governing horse boarding, other than animal cruelty statutes and local zoning regulations governing use of the property. Landlord/tenant law generally does not apply to horse boarding relationships unless the boarder lives on the stable property. Therefore, in general, the terms of horse boarding relationships are governed solely by contract (written or verbal).

What are the minimum accommodations a boarding stable is legally required to provide?

Unless the boarding contract says otherwise, a boarding stable is only required to provide the absolute minimum level of care – i.e., not violate state animal cruelty laws. State law generally requires providing access to potable water. Beyond that, requirements vary, but are usually quite minimal. For example, depending on the state and local laws, a boarding stable may not be legally required to provide shelter, and there may be no restriction on the number of horses that a boarding facility can keep on a particular piece of property. So, having a written horse boarding contract that spells out all of the important terms and conditions is essential for both boarding stable and boarder! ELS offers a downloadable horse boarding contract and forms package.

How much notice is a boarder required to give a boarding stable before moving out?

Boarding contracts usually say how much notice a boarder is required to give before leaving, and often, it is 30 days. However, if there is no boarding contract, or the boarding contract does not say what notice is required, the boarder can give as little as same-day notice.

Does a boarder have to give a boarding stable written notice before moving out?...

Read more here:
https://www.equinelegalsolutions.com/boarding-rights-and-responsibilities.html

Tuesday, September 10, 2019

How to Ride Your Horse Down a Steep Trail Safely

Horse-canada.com - Full Article

Trainer Jason Irwin offers tips for teaching your horse how to travel carefully down a steep trail, slow and steady to keep you both safe.

By: Jason Irwin | July 4, 2019

The safest way to ride down a steep trail is slow and steady. The faster your horse goes down a steep trail, the more his weight is on his front end. The problem with that is if he trips and his weight is already on his front, he’s pretty likely to stumble or possibly fall. If he goes slower, his weight is probably going to be on his back end, which means he’ll be less likely to stumble, and if he does there’s a much better chance that he’ll easily recover from it.

To get your horse going downhill slow, start with trails that aren’t very steep. Ride down small hills and stop him several times before you get to the bottom. This will cause him to think of going down hills as a time to go slow. If you feel him start to rush, stop immediately and back him up a few steps. Backing up a hill is a lot of work for a horse, so this is a mild reprimand for rushing and it also really causes him to use his hind end...

Read more here:
https://horse-canada.com/magazine_articles/ride-horse-steep-trail-safely

Sunday, September 08, 2019

Omeprazole and Calcium Digestibility: What Horse Owners Should Know

KER.com - Full Article

July 15, 2019
By Kentucky Equine Research Staff

Omeprazole, the only FDA-approved drug for healing gastric ulcers in horses, may cause reduced calcium digestibility, according to a recent study conducted at Kentucky Equine Research. What does this finding mean to horse owners who rely on the medication to keep their horses healthy?

Gastric Ulcers in Horses and Omeprazole

Researchers estimate 40-90% of horses have gastric ulcers, with those engaged in certain athletic disciplines, such as racing, at higher risk. Excessive gastric acid production ranks as a primary trigger for the development of ulcers. Omeprazole prevents gastric acid secretion in horses, thus rendering it an effective treatment for ulcers.

Omeprazole and other drugs known as proton pump inhibitors are used to treat acid-related conditions in humans. When given to humans, reduced gastric acid production is associated with a decline in the digestibility of several nutrients, including protein, fat, calcium, iron, and vitamin B12.

In horses, however, the effect of omeprazole on nutrient digestibility was unknown.

A study was therefore designed to determine the effect of short-term administration of omeprazole on the digestibility of several nutrients.

Researchers found that omeprazole did not affect the digestibility of dry matter, crude protein, fat, acid detergent fiber, neutral detergent fiber, starch, or water-soluble carbohydrates. Omeprazole did not change the digestibility of any mineral except calcium. Calcium digestibility decreased by as much as 20% in horses given omeprazole...

Read more here:
https://ker.com/equinews/omeprazole-and-calcium-digestibility-what-horse-owners-should-know/?utm_source=KER+Newsletter&utm_campaign=7cb74ca8f2-Focus_on_Ulcers&utm_medium=email&utm_term=0_0d95781dfc-7cb74ca8f2-11166

Saturday, September 07, 2019

Ten Reasons to Love Sticky Ichthammol Ointment

EquusMagazine.com - Full Article

It may be smelly, sticky and sort of gross, but the drawing salve ichthammol can't be beat in terms of versatility and affordability.

THE EDITORS OF EQUUS MAGAZINE
UPDATED:MAR 10, 2017
ORIGINAL:MAR 5, 2012

Messy, smelly and downright gross, the drawing salve called ichthammol may not be your first choice for treating your horse, but you can't beat its versatility and affordability. The sticky ointment, a derivative of coal tar, reduces inflammation, draws out infection, kills germs and soothes pain.

Here are 10 uses for ichthammol:

1. Pack it around and over draining hoof punctures to draw out pus...

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Friday, August 30, 2019

Better welfare outcomes seen in domestic-level endurance

Original article, horsetalk.co.nz. photos, study credits

Endurance rides ridden at slower speeds over technically challenging terrain have fewer eliminations and better horse welfare outcomes, the authors of a New Zealand study have found.

Massey University researcher Kylie Legg and her colleagues, writing in the open-access journal Animals, noted that international media recently raised awareness around horse welfare during endurance competitions.

However, much of this attention has been focused on international-level FEI competitions.

Little, they said, is known about domestic-level competitions and their risk factors for elimination.

The researchers set out to learn more about the characteristics of endurance rides in New Zealand and the risk factors for horse eliminations due to lameness and metabolic reasons.

To do so, they looked at the records of all competitors during six competition seasons, from 2010/11 to 2015/16.

They found that endurance ride entries were dominated by lower distances (40–80 km), with the number of eliminations increasing with ride distance.

The competition season was structured with the longer, more competitive rides at the end of the season, allowing the shorter, earlier rides to be used as conditioning rides.

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There were 6885 starts, involving 775 horses and 665 riders. The horses had a median age of 9 years and had a median of three starts per season.

Accumulated ride distance per season per horse decreased from a median of 240km per horse in 2010/11 to 180km per horse in 2015/16.

Ride entries were dominated by the 40km category, comprising 41% of entries, and 80km, comprising 37% of entries.

Eliminations increased with ride distance, from 7% in 40km rides to 53% in the 160km rides.

Lameness accounted for the majority of eliminations, at 64%.

The odds of elimination due to lameness were significantly associated with ride distance, location (North or South Island) and time of year.

“The 11% of starters eliminated for metabolic reasons of the horse had increased odds of elimination associated with horse age, ride distance, location and time of year,” they reported.

Discussing their findings, the researchers noted that horses competing in the South Island had a higher risk of elimination due to lameness than those in the North Island, which had a higher risk of elimination due to metabolic reasons.

“This may be attributable to a number of factors including terrain (South Island has rougher terrain), climate (warmer in the North Island) or training methods between the two islands, all of which are avenues for further investigation.”

Time of year had a significant effect on the risk of elimination due to both lameness and metabolic reasons with the beginning of the season (August–October) having the lowest risk for both reasons.
Risk of elimination due to lameness increased as the season progressed until April/May.

“This,” they said, “was likely an effect of the progressive loading of training and competitions throughout the season in addition to the higher number of horses starting in longer distance competitions later in the season.”

Furthermore, the summer months (November to March) coincide with warmer, drier weather, resulting in hard ground, likely to increase the concussive forces on the horse.

There was an increased risk of elimination due to metabolic reasons in November and March–May. This was likely due to the longer distance rides offered at these times of year, but could also reflect the advent of summer in November, and the beginning of cooler weather from March to May.

“The changing temperatures and increase of dust/pollen in the environment at these times of year may adversely affect the horses’ respiratory systems.”

Additionally, the championship events (North Island, South Island and National Championships) include the majority of longer distance rides and are held between January and Easter.

“Riders are likely to ride more competitively and thus faster, at these events, and the higher elimination rates from these longer distance rides are more in line with those found in the international literature.”

Longer distance rides also include a proportion of the event ridden in the dark, most commonly in the earlier stages of the ride, making it more difficult to judge the terrain and thereby increasing the risk of a horse becoming lame.

Risk of elimination due to metabolic reasons increased with increasing horse age, similar to previous studies.

This, they suggested, may be related to the minimum age limits set for competitions in New Zealand (minimum 6 years old for rides of 100km or more and 7 years for rides of 140km or more).

These restrictions are likely to encourage more conservative racing strategies in younger horses and thus a lower risk of elimination for these horses, they said.

In conclusion, the study team said endurance competitions in New Zealand are attended by a diverse population of horses and riders, the majority of which participate in shorter distance rides, with slow speeds and few starts during the season.

“This reflects the amateur profile of New Zealand competitors and their use of shorter distance rides as conditioning rides for the more competitive, longer distance rides later in the season.

“The number of open level (and longer distance) competitors decreased over the study period, whilst the number of lower level competitors increased, reflecting the changing profile of the sport in New Zealand.”

Both speed and elimination rate increased with ride distance. Ride distance, location and month of year significantly affected the risk of elimination due to lameness or metabolic reasons, whilst horse age was a significant factor for risk of elimination due to metabolic reasons only.

“This profile provides a basis for the adaptation of international regulations specific to endurance rides in New Zealand and confirms that endurance rides ridden at slower speeds over technically challenging terrain have fewer eliminations and better horse welfare.”

The full Massey study team comprised Legg, Jenny Weston, Erica Gee, Charlotte Bolwell, Janis Bridges and Chris Rogers.

Tuesday, August 20, 2019

Worried About Riding in the Dark? Don't Be



August 13 2019
by Merri Melde-Endurance.net

If you've got a 100-mile endurance ride on your bucket list, but it's worry about riding in the dark that's holding you back, don't be troubled. There are a number of things you can do to make you feel more comfortable while riding in the dark, though sometimes we tend to overthink, and make things more difficult than they really are.

The best thing you can do to make riding in the dark easier is: become a better horseman. (You should always be working on this.) As you learn better communication with your horse, as you learn more balanced and centered riding, you become a better rider and a better partner, and with that comes trust, and with that, you can tackle anything with more confidence.

According to an Equus Magazine article, "Horses have excellent night vision, and on a night lit by a partial moon or by bright stars alone, normally sighted horses can see as well as you do in full daylight.

"The extreme darkness of dense woods and those rare pitch-black nights isn't entirely suitable for riding, but in familiar territory your horse can navigate well enough when you allow him to choose his own path."

I talked to several experienced endurance riders who have riding in the dark down to a science whose advice can help put your mind at ease.

Heather and Jeremy Reynolds are long-time national and international endurance riders. Heather has over 22,000 AERC miles, 50 AERC 100-mile completions, and 3 Tevis Cup wins. Jeremy has over 14,000 AERC miles, 31 AERC 100-mile completions, and 3 Tevis Cup wins.

They both always ride with a headlamp in 100-mile rides. Competing at night with winning or a Top Ten goal in mind means trotting and cantering in the dark; they ride with a headlamp on. They normally don't bother with glowsticks taped to breast collars, because those won't help much in a situation where you're moving along at a fast clip. Heather says, "Unless you’re going 6 miles an hour or less, you’re going to ride faster than the light is projecting. Same with a red headlamp.

"If there’s a full moon and it’s casting a shadow, that’s awesome. Then don’t ride with a light. You can canter along with a bright moon. But if the trail's going to be technical and it’s going to be really dark, we just ride with a headlamp. It’s just safer.

"Also then you’ll know, is the horse slowing down because it just doesn’t want to continue at this pace, or because there’s a hazard in the trail."

If you do choose to ride with a headlamp, the Reynolds recommend turning it on before it gets dark all the way, as sometimes a horse will freak out when you suddenly turn it on in the darkness - not from the light itself but from the shadows thrown by the horse's head.

A horse having pre-ridden a trail will remember it. Heather recounted riding French Open, the 2018 Tevis Cup winner, over the last few miles to the Auburn finish line in the pure dark. "I turned my headlight off, and I was going at a very fast pace, but no one could see where I was. But that was towards the end of the ride. The horse knew exactly where he was; he knew every foot of that trail because that’s where he trained.

"So you can move out in the dark; it’s just easier, as far as your expectations, if you’re aware of and can see what you’re asking the horse to do."

You should be careful and respectful of others if you do ride with a headlamp. "It does bother some people," Heather said. Riding up from behind someone who's not using a headlamp can cast weird shadows, and while turning a light on and off doesn't bother a horse, the shadows can bother some. Simply be polite and courteous, and turn your headlamp off when you get close to another horse, and turn it back on when you pass them. You'll appreciate it when someone does that for you.

Some have said that horses need 20 minutes to adjust to the changes in light, but the Reynolds have not found this to be true (they have put this to the test in training.) "You can turn on your light, then turn it off the next minute, and the horse just keeps right on marching, doesn’t bobble or trip or anything."

Heather's best advice? "Just practice riding in the dark. Try it at home when you’re fresh, and not tired. That magnifies everything when you’re tired at mile 90 and you’re dehydrated and loopy already!"

Meg Sleeper, top USA and international endurance rider with over 15,000 AERC miles and 74 100-mile completions, just rode in Australia for the first time in July, completing the iconic Tom Quilty. Like most 100-mile rides in Australia and New Zealand, this one started at midnight. Why? "Because it's so much fun starting in the dark on a fresh horse," Aussie endurance rider Linda Tanian joked. But seriously. "It is about utilising cooler weather conditions, tradition, [and] getting finished in daylight if possible," she said, "as it can be mentally tougher going into the dark when both rider and horse are getting tired."

Many riders wore headlamps that were brighter than any Meg had ever seen. "At the start," she said, "it felt like you were going on a street with headlights. It was crazy how bright it was. Of course if they turned to look at you, it was blinding." Despite unfamiliarity with both the trail and the horse she was riding, and despite the fact she'd be doing more than half the mileage in the dark, Meg stuck to what she usually does: she wore a headlamp on her helmet though she left it turned off, and she carried a flashlight in her pocket. "I have a flashlight in my pocket in case I really need to carefully look at markings, like if I think i missed a turn. And I have a headlamp that is bright enough that I have an idea of what the footing is, but it’s not actually very bright.

"I don’t like having a super bright light on, because then I have to remember to turn it off if I look at somebody.

"As long as I have an idea of what the footing is, I feel pretty comfortable with that. And I think so much that the horses are fine. They stay out of their way as much as anything else."

Meg did mention an old Vermont township law that one needs to have lights in front and lights behind if you are riding in the dark. In this case. a glowstick on a breast collar and a glowstick in a horse's tail or on the back of the saddle suffices.

Riding in the dark all comes down to common sense. Don't overthink it. Get to where you trust your horse - be it through riding lessons, auditing or attending training clinics, taking your horse through bomb proofing clinics, or just many more wet saddle pads. Learn to ride very balanced and centered in your saddle for those twisty-turny-uppy-downy trails your horse flies along in the dark. Use glowsticks on your horse's breast collar - though if you're going faster than a fast walk, they are likely more comforting to you than of use to your horse. If you wear a headlamp for when you're moving out, or unsure of the terrain, turn it off when you're approaching other riders. Practice in the dark at home.

And - relax. Your horse will probably know what he's doing and he'll probably see fine to negotiate the trail.

And lastly, simple advice from one more experienced endurance rider, Regina Rose with over 14,000 AERC miles, and 18 100-mile completions, including the Tevis Cup once, and the Big Horn 100 nine times.

"Just ride."