Thursday, May 23, 2019

Check Horses’ Alfalfa Hay for Blister Beetles

Thehorse.com - Full Article

BLISTER BEETLES IN ALFALFA CAN BE DEADLY. HERE’S WHAT TO WATCH FOR AND HOW TO KEEP YOUR HORSES HEALTHY.

Posted by Kristen M. Janicki, MS, PAS | May 20, 2019

It might be hard to imagine that an essential part of the horse’s diet could contain potentially deadly hidden toxins. But it’s a hard truth that horse owners must be aware of: Alfalfa hay can harbor blister beetles (Epicauta spp), which can contain a harmful toxic substance called cantharidin.

A member of the Meloidae family, blister beetles live throughout the United States and Canada. Their average body length is about 0.3 to 1.3 inches. A blister beetle’s diet is mainly composed of pollen, blossoms, and leaves of flowering plants, making alfalfa the perfect meal for them. Most alfalfa infestation occurs during late summer and early fall, when the adult blister beetle population also peaks.

Male blister beetles produce a natural defense toxin called cantharidin. This irritant can cause blisters on skin (of both horses and humans) within a few hours of contact, hence the insect’s name. When ingested, cantharidin is lethal in horses with as little as half a milligram per kilogram of body weight, equivalent to consumption of around 125 beetles for an average-sized horse. And it’s not just the live insects that are harmful: The toxin is still effective long after the beetle dies...

Read more here:
https://thehorse.com/112252/check-horses-alfalfa-hay-for-blister-beetles/

Tuesday, May 21, 2019

Risk - by Irish Horse

Trails-and-trials-with-major Blog - Full Story

May 12 2019
by Irish Horse

A very sad event happened on a local trail: a horse tried to turn on a very narrow trail, lost it's footing, and slid down the side, where it broke it's leg. It had to be euthanized. This is a tragedy for horse and rider, and I have nothing but sympathy for them. There were posts wondering what trail it was, and I realized this is a trail I ride weekly. I never thought this section was particularly dangerous, but it sadly was for that horse.

Some folks called for the trail to be closed, some for it to be inspected, (which was done, and it was determined it wasn't any worse than other parts of the trail), and some remarked that horses and riding are inherently risky activities. There was a comment that all of our trails should be brought up to a higher safety standard. While great in theory, that would literally mean about 95% of the trail in question (Pioneer Express) and probably 85% of the Tevis trail (just to name a few!) would be deemed unsafe.

This brought up many different, and sometimes conflicting, ideas in my head. I DID almost slide down a (even steeper) cliff alongside the trail myself earlier this year. Luckily my athletic horse saved us. It could have gone very wrong. Maybe I should have been paying more attention to exactly where he places his feet, and riding more aggressively, but I do let Major pick the trail most of the time. Will I be more attentive in those steep sections after that? Most certainly!...

Read more here:
http://trails-and-trials-with-major.blogspot.com/2019/05/risk.html

Monday, May 20, 2019

The Long Haul to a New Home

Horseandrider.com - Full Article

A cross-country move—with a horse—is a lot to take on. Whether you’ve accepted the job of your dreams or are moving closer to family, these 12 tips will help you plan and execute a successful relocation of your horse.


KATIE NAVARRAFEB 23, 2018

Nearly a decade ago, Megan Carter and her then-12-year-old Arabian gelding, Amigo, prepared for a long trek from Juneau, Alaska, to the Eastern Seaboard. The climate and culture of upstate New York was a stark contrast of her native Alaska, but provided a once-in-a-lifetime career opportunity. But after 10 years, it was time for Carter and Amigo to return home.

“I answered the call of the eagles and decided it was time to follow my heart and return home to be with my family and friends,” she says.

In less than six weeks, Carter orchestrated a 4,000-mile relocation for herself and the now 22-year-old Amigo. Her eight-day trip crossed 12 states, the Continental Divide, and the Mississippi and Missouri Rivers, and traveled through international waters. Travel by land culminated in Bellingham, Washington. There are no roads connecting Juneau to the rest of Alaska—or even the rest of North America. That meant the final three days of the journey were aboard a ferry boat.

It wasn’t the pair’s first cross-country experience, but a lot had changed in horse relocation since they’d left Alaska. Carter relied on her tried-and-true strategies from her first adventure and learned a few more. Here she offers 12 tips to make your cross-country—and even cross-water—excursion more comfortable for you and horse...

Read more here.

Sunday, May 19, 2019

History rides in on horseback

LMTribune.com - Full Article

Nez Perce Tribe’s famed Appaloosa horses among stars of Culture Day

May 19 2019
By ERIC BARKER of the Tribune

SPALDING — Nez Perce riders dressed in full regalia and sitting astride their beautiful Appaloosa horses rode into the Nez Perce National Historic Park Saturday morning.

The dappled sunshine flooding through the trees at the park matched the distinctive spots for which the horses are known as the riders circled an event tent at Culture Day.

Joe Lewis, of Spokane and vice president of the Nez Perce Appaloosa Horse Club, said the breed that was developed by the Nez Perce Tribe in the 1700s is known for its endurance and strength. Lewis is a great-great grandson of Ollokot, a Nez Perce leader and key figure in the War of 1877, and brother of Chief Joseph...

Read more here:
https://lmtribune.com/northwest/history-rides-in-on-horseback/article_44571775-3319-541f-97b1-7529754067b7.html

Friday, May 10, 2019

Suited to Endurance?

DistanceRidersOfManitoba.ca - Full Article

April 25, 2019 by Darice Whyte

I sold one of my beautiful Arabian mares recently. I have owned Shalimar Cierra Rose for 10 years and during that time I tried to make her into an endurance horse. Despite my best attempts it just wasn’t her forte. I could tell she was thinking “how much further is this crazy lady going to ride me?”

She certainly wasn’t a 50 mile horse and she had way more whoa than go. She preferred to show me how well she could jump logs on the trail than race down the trail.

Someone once said to me “they can’t all be endurance horses you know”. I thought he was referring to other breeds. Not an Arabian! But yes, he was right. You just can’t fit a square peg into a round hole. Sometimes it just doesn’t work even if it is an Arabian...

Read more here:
http://www.distanceridersofmanitoba.ca/DRM/2019/04/25/suited-to-endurance/

Equine Colic Imitators

TheHorse.com - Full Article

MANY OTHER CONDITIONS BESIDES COLIC CAN CAUSE COLICLIKE SIGNS. AND AS WITH COLIC, DELAYED TREATMENT OR MISDIAGNOSIS CAN HAVE SERIOUS CONSEQUENCES. HERE’S WHAT YOU NEED TO KNOW.

Posted by Alexandra Beckstett, The Horse Managing Editor | Apr 22, 2019

IS IT ABDOMINAL PAIN OR SOMETHING ELSE?

Discover your horse restless, pawing, and lying down repeatedly in his stall, and you might immediately think, “He’s colicking.”

Nine times out of 10, you’re probably right. But it’s important to understand that many, many other conditions besides colic can cause coliclike signs. And as with colic, delayed treatment or misdiagnosis can have serious consequences.

“For many of these conditions, if you were to inadvertently take a horse to (exploratory colic) surgery, you might very well might make the animal worse, not to mention spend a lot of money unnecessarily,” says Barbara Dallap Schaer, VMD, Dipl. ACVS, ACVECC, associate professor of emergency medicine and critical care at the University of Pennsylvania School of Veterinary Medicine, in Kennett Square.

Dealing With Equine Colic: Here are 33 Do's and Don'ts
RELATED RESOURCE: Dealing With Equine Colic: Here are 33 Do’s and Don’ts

Veterinarians define colic as abdominal pain or discomfort—something she says is critical for owners to understand. The classic signs of a horse with colic are many...

Read more here:
https://thehorse.com/157326/equine-colic-imitators/

Thursday, May 09, 2019

Should I Wrap an Abscessed Hoof?

TheHorse.com - Full Article

Dr. Britt Conklin offers suggestions on how to keep an abscessed hoof clean.

Posted by Britt Conklin, DVM | Apr 16, 2019

Q. My horse recently had a deep abscess in her hoof and a friend advised me to keep the hoof wrapped for a bit to prevent bacteria from getting trapped into the hole as it heals. Is this a good practice? And how long should I keep her hoof wrapped?
—Via email

A.Abscesses are simply pressurized pockets of bacteria, fungi, or dying tissue that expand and travel along the path of least resistance in the foot. They’re frequently found in the epidermal layers of the wall, sole, or frog but can migrate along planes into dermal or deeper tissues when the path of least resistance drives them that direction...

Read more here:
https://thehorse.com/112599/should-i-wrap-an-abscessed-hoof/

Tuesday, May 07, 2019

Cooling a hot horse

MelNewton.com - Full Article

May 5 2019
by Mel Newton

Here’s a highly simplified and barely scientific explanation of why it’s important to cool a hot horse during a vet check at an endurance ride.

It boils down to this simple concept:

Blood has lots of jobs to do in the horse’s body. Once your horse is standing in the vet check, the blood has two choice – cool the body by going to the skin and releasing heat, or go to the GI system and absorb water, calories and electrolytes. There’s only so much blood to go around, so if it’s busy cooling your horse down, it won’t be helping the digestion system move around and do its thing. You gotta help your horse cool so the blood can prioritize the digestion system!...

Read more here:
http://melnewton.com/2019/cooling-a-hot-horse/?fbclid=IwAR3u_PIyja4_vYMkoL_jnP93TXqtQQuzZ4sxJjcDgZ19ZdqG-Yojdwu1A50

Monday, May 06, 2019

Morgan horses are an American original

LeaderTelegram.com - Full Article

May 6 2019
By Carol Watson Correspondent

The Morgan horse has proven its worth in a variety of equine disciplines, including dressage, show jumping and driving. Known for its speed, courage and gentle nature, the Morgan also is America’s first native breed.

An unusual beginning
In 1789, a Middleton, Vt., schoolteacher named Justin Morgan acquired a small colt in payment for a debt. Giving him the name of Figure, the colt’s pedigree was uncertain, although there was some evidence to suggest that he was sired by English Thoroughbred True Briton. (a.k.a. Beautiful Bay).

Standing just 14 hands high, Figure was fast and smart with so much speed and stamina that he could out-pull a draft horse and outrun the speediest racer. Stories of his exploits spread throughout New England, and Figure was soon in demand for his stud services.

Known for his prepotency, Figure passed on his good looks and abilities to his progeny, including three of his sons — Bulrush, Sherman and Woodbury. They would become the foundation bloodstock of the Morgan breed.

In his later years, Figure was put out to pasture, although he did have one final moment of glory when he was chosen to carry then-President James Monroe on a July 1817 muster-day parade in Montpelier, Vt.

Four years later, Figure died at the age of 32 from the kick of another horse on the Levi Bean Farm in Tunbridge, Vt. He is buried on that farm under a a large gray stone just 15 miles away from the grave of his namesake and first owner, Justin Morgan...

Read more here:
https://www.leadertelegram.com/country-today/horses/morgan-horses-are-an-american-original/article_7ff9a3e3-0b99-52c5-b8cd-4db685632c93.html

Tuesday, April 30, 2019

Veterinarians Discuss How to Manage Equine Gastric Ulcers

TheHorse.com - Full Article

From when to administer ulcer medication to how to deal with recurring ulcers, veterinarians offer tips and tricks on managing this common horse health condition.


Posted by Stacey Oke, DVM, MSc | Feb 20, 2019

Dealing with equine gastric ulcer syndrome (EGUS) can leave owners with more questions than answers. And they’re not alone—it turns out veterinarians have questions about EGUS, too.

As a remedy, vets participated in a question-and-answer format Table Topic on managing EGUS during the 2018 American Association of Equine Practitioners convention, held Dec. 1-5 in San Francisco, California. Frank Andrews, DVM, Dipl. ACVIM, director of the Equine Health Studies Program and clinical medicine service chief at Louisiana State University School of Veterinary Medicine, in Baton Rouge, and Sarah Reuss, VMD, Dipl. ACVIM, a veterinary specialist with Boehringer Ingelheim Animal Health, co-moderated the discussion.

Equine gastric ulcer syndrome collectively refers to ulcers or erosions in either the squamous (upper) or glandular (lower) regions of the horse’s stomach. These painful lesions have been identified in a high number of horses, particularly those in intense training and competition, and a variety of dietary and management factors can make them worse. Gastric ulcers can cause performance issues and ill-thrift and might signal the need for husbandry changes. They also warrant aggressive treatment and management...

Read more here:
https://thehorse.com/166040/veterinarians-discuss-how-to-manage-equine-gastric-ulcers/

Monday, April 29, 2019

Brendan Riley’s Solano Chronicles: ‘Deafy’ Derrick’s Tall Tales

TimesHeraldOnline.com - Full Article

By BRENDAN RILEY |
April 28, 2019

Frank “Deafy” Derrick, one of Vallejo’s most colorful characters a century ago, claimed to have ridden with Kit Carson to Montana, where he met William “Buffalo Bill” Cody and they both became Pony Express riders and Indian fighters. It turns out Derrick made up many of his stories — but he still had plenty of true horseback adventures.

When Derrick died in 1938, the San Francisco native was eulogized as “one of the last links” to the Wild West. Newspapers recounted his story of running away at age 10 and winding up in Virginia City, Nev. He said he then rode with Carson from Nevada to Montana, meeting Cody there in 1862. “Deafy,” who got his nickname (pronounced deefy) because he was deaf, also told of fighting Indians on his 75-mile-long Pony Express route. He said he was wounded 10 times by bullets and arrows.

There are many holes in those stories. For starters, in 1862 “Buffalo Bill” was a teenager in Kansas, and his own claim of riding for the Pony Express has been challenged. The Pony Express started in 1860, lasted only 18 months and was gone before the end of 1861 — and its route never ran through Montana. Then there’s Derrick’s claim in his later years to be nine or 10 years older than he really was — possibly to put him closer in age to “Buffalo Bill” and make his stories more believable. But numerous records show he was born in 1856. Skinny boys in their teens were favored as Pony Express riders, but not 6-year-old children — Derrick’s age in 1862. As for riding with Kit Carson, Carson’s last stop in Nevada was in 1853 — three years before Derrick was born — and he was mainly in New Mexico throughout the 1860s...

Read more here:
https://www.timesheraldonline.com/2019/04/28/brendan-rileys-solano-chronicles-deafy-derricks-tall-tales/

Friday, April 26, 2019

Heather Wallace, The Timid Rider, Launches Equestrian Confidence Retreat in Mongolia

April 24 2019

Discover, immerse, and build confidence in the saddle while learning horsemanship in the heart of Mongolia. Experience the nomadic culture from the back of an ancient breed of horse. Relax, have fun, and enjoy the ride while changing your mindset into one that is more positive!

A brand new and exclusive horse-riding retreat will launch July 2020 in the Khentti Plain of Mongolia, hosted by Heather Wallace, The Timid Rider, and Camille Champagne, an FEI 3* Endurance Rider and Natural Horsemanship Trainer.

This retreat is the perfect opportunity to explore the Mongolian nomadic culture for riders that may struggle with confidence in the saddle. Learn natural horsemanship to understand behavior better and improve communication, learn a positive mindset and meditation techniques. Muster horses with the nomads, ride across the Gobi Desert with Heather and Camille, and end the day with yoga, and so much more. The possibilities are endless.

One week can change your life.

We are now taking applications. Six spots are available for July 26 to August 1, 2020.


About Heather Wallace

Heather Wallace is the award-winning author of Confessions of a Timid Rider, and equestrian blogger at The Timid Rider talking honestly about confidence, challenging yourself, and overcoming obstacles.

Heather is also the Content Manager and a regular writer for EquineInfoExchange.com as well as the Media Coordinator for the Gobi Desert Cup, an endurance race in Mongolia. In her spare time, of which she has little, she spends her time with her husband, three children, two dogs, and pony. You can follow her on social media @timidrider or at timidrider.com.

Contact:
Heather Wallace
Ph: 732-784-7195
Em: heather@timidrider.com
www.timidrider.com

Wednesday, April 24, 2019

Horse Topline-Building Tips

TheHorse.com - Full Article

These six steps can help transform your horse’s topline from underdeveloped to well-toned.

Posted by Christa Lesté-Lasserre, MA | Apr 23, 201

Six ways to transform your horse’s topline from underdeveloped to well-toned
Bettina had a good topline. Her neck and back musculature was even, with no fat lumps. Her neck transitioned smoothly into her shoulders, with no abrupt or angular gaps alongside her withers. Her spine was surrounded by a nice continuum of toned muscles along its length down into the croup.

Then, life happened. I bred my 1,500-pound, 17-hand Warmblood mare, and she had a foal. Then another. Then I loaned her out to a couple of young riders who started her back under saddle doing dressage, jumping, and cross-country. And little by little the problems started. While she took home ribbons at shows, she became grumpy, pinning her ears when she saw riders approaching her stall, snapping while getting girthed up. Eventually she showed subtle signs of lameness, leading to her retirement.

Bettina arrived home fit, strong, lame, and with a prominent ridge spanning from withers to rump. Her vertebral column peaked above everything around it. The top of her croup protruded, and she had gaps beside her withers. At 13 years old Bettina wasn’t starved, wasn’t neglected, and wasn’t unfit. But she, like many other working horses, had a severely undeveloped topline. Her history of foaling, poor saddle fit, possibly inappropriate nutrition, and lameness all ­contributed.

With proper attention to her needs and a lot of patience, though, I’m seeing Bettina’s lovely look start to come back again. These six steps can help others in the same boat achieve a topline ­transformation...

Read more here:
https://thehorse.com/170405/horse-topline-building-tips/

Tuesday, April 23, 2019

All About Feeding Horses Alfalfa

Thehorse.com - Full Article

Learn more about alfalfa and whether this leafy green legume is a good choice for your horse.

Posted by Heather Smith Thomas | Mar 11, 2019

How much do you really know about this leafy green legume?
In some areas of the country, alfalfa is a regular part of life. It’s readily available and commonly fed, so it’s a logical foundation for many horses’ diets. In other areas, it is a delicacy of sorts, shipped in from different regions and bought a bale at a time on a vet’s recommendation to help certain horses that need nutritional support. For some types of horses—in either of those areas—-alfalfa simply isn’t a great choice. And, so, that fragrant green bale comes loaded with nutrients and, for some horse owners, a multitude of misconceptions.

Whatever your alfalfa experience, we’re here to tell you everything you need to know about this forage, starting with a little bit of history, and clear up any confusion about it...

Read more here:
https://thehorse.com/110110/all-about-alfalfa/

Horse Hoof Abscess Facts

Thehorse.com - Full Article

Do abscesses occur more often in front or hind hooves? Do male or female horses recover from hoof abscesses quicker? When are abscesses most commonly diagnosed? Researchers found answers to these questions and more in a recent study.

Posted by Christa Lesté-Lasserre, MA | Apr 17, 2019

Fact: Hoof abscesses are one of the most common causes of sudden-onset severe lameness in horses.
Fact: Complications can delay hoof abscess healing.

Fact: In most cases, horses recover well.

And, until recently, there wasn’t much more scientific data on subsolar abscesses than that. So researchers from the University of Pennsylvania School of Veterinary Medicine (Penn Vet) set out to put more hard data behind these common hoof ailments. They wanted to identify trends that could help horse owners and their veterinarians better manage abscesses and more accurately anticipate how they’ll heal and if they’re likely to develop complications...

Read more here:
https://thehorse.com/170191/horse-hoof-abscess-facts/

Monday, April 22, 2019

​​​Horse Buyers: Don’t Make These Critical Veterinary ​Pre-Purchase Exam Mistakes

Equinelegalsolutions.com - Full Article

1. Not Getting a Pre-Purchase Exam

At Equine Legal Solutions, many of our legal consultations are with unhappy horse buyers. One of the first questions we ask is, “Did you get a pre-purchase vet exam?” Often, the answer is “no.” The buyer regretfully explains they thought it would be “too expensive” to get a PPE, or they “really trusted” the seller. But now, they now own a horse they never would have bought if they knew what its true physical condition was. Frequently, the horse has a chronic lameness issue or other physical condition that will make it nearly impossible to resell (or even give away), creating a frustrating and expensive situation for the buyer. In hindsight, the buyer would have happily spent $1,000 or more on a pre-purchase exam and avoided the considerably higher expense of diagnosing and treating the horse’s problems.

2. Using the Seller’s Vet

Often, horse buyers use the seller’s vet to perform a pre-purchase exam, particularly in situations where the horse is located in another city, state or even country. This situation presents a conflict of interest for the vet, to the point where some equine veterinarians have a strict policy of not performing pre-purchase exams on clients’ horses...

Read more here:
https://www.equinelegalsolutions.com/critical-veterinary-pre-purchase-exam-mistakes.html

Sunday, April 21, 2019

Supplement Could Help Control Horse Pasture Parasite Burdens

Thehorse.com - Full Article

Could adding a supplement to your horses’ feed reduce the worm burden on your pasture? Researchers recently tested an Australian product designed to do just that—and with positive results.

Posted by Jill Griffiths | Mar 5, 2019

Could adding a supplement to your horses’ feed reduce the worm burden on your pasture? Researchers recently tested an Australian product designed to do just that—and with positive results.

In recent field trials a feed supplement (commercially available in Australia as BioWorma) effectively reduced the “gastrointestinal nematode (GIN) infectivity of pasture surrounding the feces of treated horses,” the researchers said.

The supplement contains spores of the fungus Duddingtonia flagrans IAH 1297. The fungal spores pass through the horse’s gastrointestinal tract unharmed and are deposited in manure. There, they germinate and grow a mass of fungal hyphae—fine rootlike structures—and sticky traps that inhibit worm larvae, ultimately trapping and killing them...

Read more here:
https://thehorse.com/165635/supplement-could-help-control-horse-pasture-parasite-burdens/

Horses and Sheep Coexist Well, Improve Pasture Health

Thehorse.com - Full Article

Researchers recently studied how horses and sheep interacted with each other and used pasture resources—plants, water, and shade.

Posted by Christa Lesté-Lasserre, MA | Mar 3, 2019

We all want pristine and productive pastures for our horses. Research suggests mixing grazing species can help support healthy pasture maintenance. But while protecting the pasture is important, so is protecting the welfare of the animals living on it. That’s why researchers recently studied the behavior of horses sharing a pasture with sheep. They wanted to see how the animals interacted with each other and how they used the pasture resources (namely plants, water, and shade).

They found that the sheep and horses in their study coexisted peacefully and even began to intermingle, said Monika Greguła-Kania, PhD, of the University of Life Sciences Institute of Animal Breeding and Biodiversity Conservation, in Lublin, Poland.

“We observed no aggression between these species,” Greguła-Kania said. “Both species mixed together and even drank from one single water tank at the same time...”

Read more here:
https://thehorse.com/167577/horses-and-sheep-coexist-well-improve-pasture-health/

Deciphering Your Feed Tag: Performance Horse Feeds

Thehorse.com - Full Article

These feeds are designed to boost horses’ calorie intake and meet additional nutrient needs that increase with work.

Posted by Shannon Pratt-Phillips, MSc, PhD | Mar 22, 2019

In the second installment of our three-part commercial feed tag series, we take a look at working horses and their energy needs.

It probably goes without saying, but performance horse feeds are designed to meet the nutrient requirements of athletic horses. The greatest increase in nutrient requirements (other than water!) these animals experience when they work or perform is energy, which is quantified in the diet as calories. Heavily exercising horses burn more calories than they might be able to consume with hay or pasture alone. Thus, manufacturers have designed commercial performance feeds to boost horses’ calorie intake, as well as to meet additional nutrient needs that increase with work.

Essential Energy

In the figure below, you can see energy and protein requirements rising with increasing levels of work and how the horses’ elevated calorie needs are far greater than their elevated protein needs. While other nutrient requirements, such as those for calcium and phosphorus, also increase with work, calories should always be your biggest concern...

Read more here:
https://thehorse.com/113202/deciphering-your-feed-tag-performance-horse-feeds/

Saturday, April 20, 2019

Hoof Boots Market with Current Trends, 2018-2028

NewsFinancialAnalyst.com - full article

April 19, 2019 James

Market Overview:

Professionals who practice horse riding feel that hoof boots are excellent substitutes to the earlier used horseshoes. Hoof boots are often used as a backup either when the farrier is unavailable or in case of a thrown horseshoe or as hoof protection for a barefoot horse. The popularity of hoof boots is increasing in all disciplines of horse riding, particularly in endurance riding and trail riding. With the increasing demand, hoof boots are now available for every kind of horse playing any discipline of horse riding. Hoof boots are extremely necessary for horses that have recently been inducted into the sport, to protect their hoof from getting damaged in the uncomfortable terrains. Additionally, in some hoof boots, equine hoof pads are provided to ensure more comfort and additional support...

Full report at:
https://newsfinancialanalyst.com/hoof-boots-market-with-current-trends-analysis-2018-2028/

Friday, April 19, 2019

Adversity is a Catalyst for Change

Thriveglobal.com - Full Article

By Charisse Glenn, Casting Director, Equestrian and Creator of The Let Go
April 18 2019

Adversity is a part of life. Some of us have more of it than others yet, we all experience it. The manner in which it comes into our lives is as diverse as the adversity itself. Finding ways to be resilient in the face of life’s’ challenges is a measure of who we are.

Conflict is challenging for me. I am not a good fighter. However, when faced with adversity the warrior woman in me surfaces.

Like all of us, I have navigated family, relationship, career, and financial hardships. Yet, much of the adversity in my life has come in the form of natural disasters. Living in California, fires, floods, and earthquakes are a matter of course.

I was forced, however, to face my own mortality while competing in a 100-mile endurance horse race, in the Australia Outback. Caught in the worst storm in 100 years, lightning struck inches from my body and that of the horse I was on.

So loud it became silent, so bright, I was blinded. Time stood still. The world stopped. I could not make a move, whether it was physically possible or not, I was paralyzed as the lightning struck three times…caging us within its fury. When my senses returned, survival mode kicked in and all I could think about was, I am alive…get off of the mountain.

What doesn’t kill us makes us stronger. And we carry on. And that’s what I did...

Read more here:
https://thriveglobal.com/stories/adversity-is-a-catalyst-for-change/

Thursday, April 18, 2019

How Veterinarians, Students, and Volunteers Saved Horses During a Deadly Wildfire

Thehorse.com - Full Article

Last fall, Hayley Dieckmann and the UC Davis Veterinary Emergency Response Team treated horses and other animals displaced by the Camp Fire. Here’s a look at what she experienced.


Posted by Hayley Dieckmann | Jan 31, 2019

Late last year, Northern California experienced the largest and deadliest wildfire in recent history. Butte County was on fire for 17 days. The Camp Fire killed at least 85 people and changed the lives of thousands more.

Countless more animals—including horses—were injured, traumatized, displaced, or killed by the fire. Those that survived needed care, even if their owners had evacuated the area. That’s where we came in.

During the Fire
Rescue workers, owners, and good Samaritans brought horses and livestock to the Butte County Fairgrounds for shelter and veterinary care. During the peak of the fire, the Butte County large animal shelter housed more than 700 evacuated animals, from horses to chickens to every livestock animal between...

Read more here:
https://thehorse.com/165984/how-veterinarians-students-and-volunteers-saved-horses-during-a-deadly-wildfire/

Why Are My Horse’s Hooves Growing So Fast?

Thehorse.com - Full Article

Why does a horse’s hooves grow faster than his stablemates’ who are on the same diet and exercise schedule? A veterinarian who’s also a farrier shares his thoughts.

Posted by Scott Fleming, DVM, CF | Mar 27, 2019

Q. I keep my Western pleasure horse’s front feet shod year-round so he can stay in work during the winter and to keep his hooves in decent shape; otherwise they tend to flare and crack. During our main riding season (March-late October), he’s on a six-week trim and reset schedule. But during the winter, when all our other horses’ hoof growth slows, his doesn’t—the farrier jokes that he could be trimmed every three weeks. What could be causing his hooves to grow so fast, and why would it be different from the other horses? They’re all on the same diet, exercise schedules, etc., they just have different genetics...

Read more here:
https://thehorse.com/168955/why-are-my-horses-hooves-growing-so-fast/

Liquid blood taken from 42,000-year-old frozen horse that scientists hope to clone

Foxnews.com - Full Article

By Ann W. Schmidt | Fox News
April 17 2019

Scientists were able to extract liquid blood from the heart of a 42,000-year-old foal that had been frozen and preserved in permafrost in Siberia.

The scientists are hoping to clone the prehistoric horse — which was discovered in the Siberian region of Yakutia last summer — and bring it back to life, according to The Siberian Times.

“We can now claim that this is the best-preserved Ice Age animal ever found in the world,” Semyon Grigoryev, the head of the Mammoth Museum in the regional capital of Yakutsk, told the outlet.

The foal, which is believed to be from the extinct species Equus lenensis, or Lena horse, was discovered with its skin, hair, hooves and tail all preserved. The foal was believed to be just weeks old when it likely drowned in the mud which later froze and turned to permafrost...

Read more here:
https://www.foxnews.com/science/liquid-blood-frozen-horse-clone

Sunday, April 07, 2019

Horse Gut Sounds and What They Mean

KPPUSA.com - Full Article

One way to determine if your horse is normal and healthy is to evaluate the rumblings of his gut. The technical term for a gut sound is a borborygmus (pronounced bôr′bə-rĭg′məs). The plural is borborygmi. During a physical exam a veterinarian will listen to your horse’s gut sounds with a stethoscope in the flank area to determine if normal borborygmi are present. When listening for gut sounds, both sides of the horse are evaluated and the abdomen is divided into four areas or quadrants. A healthy horse will have consistent and active rumblings in each of the four quadrants. Each area should be evaluated for at least one minute. As a general rule, it is normal to hear 1 to 3 borborygmi in a 60-second period. If less than 1 borborygmus is heard per minute then that portion of the gut is noted as hypomotile (not enough movement). If more than 3 borborygmi are heard per minute the area is noted as hypermotile (too much movement). Of course, there are variations depending on the individual horse and when he or she last ate.

Typically when a horse presents with impending enterocolitis, which often results in diarrhea, he will have a hypermotile gut with increased liquid and gas sounds. Hypermotility can be present in the early stages of obstructive disease. Hypomotility, however, is the sign of a poor gut movement and an absence of gut sounds may indicate the presence of an obstruction...

Read more here:
http://kppusa.com/2015/07/02/horse-gut-sounds/