Friday, August 16, 2019

Bute vs. Firocoxib: Which NSAID Results in More Severe Gastric Ulcers?

Thehorse.com - Full Article

Both NSAIDs induced GI tract inflammation, but phenylbutazone might result in more severe inflammation in the lower GI tract.

Posted by Clair Thunes, PhD | Aug 12, 2019

Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are the second-most frequently used drug class in horses after dewormers. Veterinarians prescribe them for a wide range of issues ranging from post-surgical recovery to orthopedic issues. While they’re invaluable for managing horses’ pain, one of their side effects is gastric ulcers.

A group of researchers from Texas A&M University recently compared two types of NSAIDs’ effects on gastric ulceration in horses. Lauren M. Richardson, DVM, a resident in large animal surgery at the College of Veterinary Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, presented their findings at the 2017 American Association of Equine Practitioners convention, held Nov. 17-21 in San Antonio, Texas.

But first, let’s review how NSAIDs work...

Read more here:
https://thehorse.com/155604/bute-vs-firocoxib-nsaid-results-severe-gastric-ulcers/

Sunday, August 11, 2019

Use of Alfalfa or Lucerne and Its Effect on Gastric Ulcers

KER.com - Full Article

May 10, 2012
By Dr. Clarissa Brown-Douglas

There has been recent hype in the feed industry about the possibility of improvements in gastric ulceration when feeding ensiled (fermented) chopped lucerne (also known as alfalfa) to horses, and many horse owners have increased the amount of ensiled fiber fed to their horses.

What might surprise you is that this capacity of fiber to protect and support a healthy digestive tract, from the stomach to the large intestine, is the basis behind almost every aspect of sound equine nutrition. This is not new knowledge!

It is commonly known, accepted, and promoted in the equine nutrition and veterinary world that the capacity of feeds and forages to counteract changes in gastric pH (stomach acid) plays an important role in the prevention of gastric ulcers in horses. This ability to resist changes in pH is called buffering capacity. Lucerne hay has been shown in multiple studies to be effective in reducing the severity of ulcers in horses by providing superior buffering capacity compared to other forages.

Gastric ulcers are very common in performance horses, affecting more than 90% of racehorses and 50 to 70% of other performance horses...

Read more here:
https://ker.com/equinews/use-alfalfa-or-lucerne-and-its-effect-gastric-ulcers/?utm_source=KER+Newsletter&utm_campaign=7cb74ca8f2-Focus_on_Ulcers&utm_medium=email&utm_term=0_0d95781dfc-7cb74ca8f2-11166

Friday, August 09, 2019

Ready for an “Eventful” Ride?

Trailmeister.com - Full Article

by Robert Eversole
June 20 2016

As published in Issue Two – 2016 of The The Icelandic Horse

It seems that it was just yesterday that I had the privilege of speaking at the USIHC Annual Meeting in Portland Oregon. I love sharing my passion for trail riding and camping with anyone who’ll listen. Having the opportunity to chat with fellow Icelandic enthusiasts was the “Icing” on the cake so to speak!

A moment of introduction is in order. I’m Robert Eversole and besides owning the web’s largest horse trail and camping guide, www.trailmeister.com, I have the privilege of sharing my knowledge of trail riding and equine camping with horse groups around the nation as a clinician, lecturer, and regular columnist in equine publications. I’m also a registered instructor with PATH Intl. and volunteer at Free Rein Therapeutic Riding in Spokane, WA where I teach equitation to individuals with special needs. My riders inspire me. Yes, I have the best job(s) in the world.

Of course, I wouldn’t be trail riding without horses. Let me first admit that my wife’s Icelandic, Minning fra Alfasaga (foaled 2002) is not only a great riding animal but also arguably a better mountain and pack horse than many I’ve seen, including my main riding beast, LT. Minning’s calm demeanor, goat like surefootedness, and willing disposition are exactly what I look for in an animal that can deliver me to and, more importantly, return me safely from the high mountain back country that I call home during the summer months. Last year Minning and I spent 32 days in wilderness areas throughout the Pacific Northwest where we helped pack in crews and equipment for maintenance projects...

Read more here:
https://www.trailmeister.com/ready-for-an-eventful-ride/?fbclid=IwAR2m2oiVeQXTDJbpwl86roI7hYAFVDe_i_flzcsKunLnRBxT58uQye_EN84

Want a Better-Behaved Horse? Consider Feeding a Low-Starch Diet

Thehorse.com - Full Article

A VIRGINIA TECH RESEARCHER INVESTIGATED THE IMPACT OF DIET ON LESSON HORSES. HERE’S WHAT SHE FOUND.

Posted by Alexandra Beckstett, The Horse Managing Editor | Jul 30, 2019

The amount of starch in a horse’s diet can affect him both behaviorally and physiologically. To better understand its effects, Tanner Price, a graduate student at Virginia Tech, in Blacksburg, assessed university riding program horses’ behavioral and metabolic responses to diets with varying fat and starch levels. She shared her findings at the 2019 Equine Science Society Symposium, held June 3-6 in Asheville, North Carolina.

In her study, Price split 20 riding horses into five groups of four. Each group received a different starch-to-fat ratio in their diet, ranging from 7.1% to 14.3% starch. Throughout the 21-day period, all horses were fed twice daily, housed individually in stalls, and ridden in regular collegiate lessons (beginner to advanced equitation and hunter/jumper classes)...

Read more at:
https://thehorse.com/176821/want-a-better-behaved-horse-consider-feeding-a-low-starch-diet/

US Equestrian Adds Member Benefit: Free Mental Health First Aid

USEF.org

by US Equestrian Communications Department | Aug 8, 2019, 2:39 PM EST

As part of our commitment to members and their wellbeing, US Equestrian is partnering with the McLaughlin Young Group to offer free, confidential counseling services for mental health first aid.

US Equestrian members will now be able to access professional counseling services for emotional or other personal issues for up to three visits or sessions through a third-party licensed provider. All providers are state-licensed, with a graduate degree and five years of post-graduate clinical experience. These experienced professional clinicians are available 24 hours a day, seven days a week, and 365 days a year. Members can reach a counselor by calling 1-800-633-3353.

This membership service is provided by McLaughlin Young, a specialist in providing services to non-profit organizations.

“Our members’ safety and wellbeing is of paramount importance to us, and we are pleased to offer this new mental health resource as a valuable benefit to US Equestrian members,” said US Equestrian Chief Executive Officer Bill Moroney. “Providing our members access to free, confidential, professional counseling demonstrates our long commitment to equestrian safety and welfare, both in the competition arena and beyond.”

Learn more about the mental health first aid resource and the many other US Equestrian member benefits by visiting our Membership Benefits page. To access the full list of membership benefits and all the US Equestrian MemberPerks, join US Equestrian today.

See more at:
https://www.usef.org/media/press-releases/us-equestrian-adds-member-benefit-free-mental

Tuesday, August 06, 2019

Sweat Patterns and Saddle Fit

SynergistSaddles.com - Full Article

It’s just about impossible to walk through a big boarding facility or barn without the topic of sweat patterns and saddle fit coming up. If all you are looking at when assessing how well your saddle fits is the sweat marks after a ride, you are only getting a small piece of the overall picture.

Here is how the theory goes. When you take your saddle off at the end of a ride you should see even sweat marks on both sides of the spine that resemble the bottom the saddle. If you see dry areas, it is supposed to mean that the pressure there was so high that it shut down the sweat glands.

The overwhelming majority of riders totally believe this is the absolute gospel of saddle fit. If this was actually true and all you had to do was look at a horse’s back after a ride to tell if a saddle fit or not, I could teach a 5 year old how to be a saddle fitter.

In the 30 years I have spent around horses with the last 17 years fitting thousands of horses I have seen horses with perfect sweat patterns with white hairs right in the middle of them. (When you see white hair showing up that is an undisputed sign of pressure and an ill fit saddle). I’ve also seen horses with the ugliest sweat patterns imaginable, asymmetrical and spotty, and the saddle fit impeccably with the horse perfectly happy and in no discomfort. So there are definitely several holes in this theory...

Read more here:
https://www.synergistsaddles.com/sweat-patterns-saddle-fit/?fbclid=IwAR2zKQpezuGf7C8O9LJgVIjS4JvjPROVI9QyBbeO0q0eXXn-wu7J5b7ZkOs

Repairing wounds with honey

EquineScienceUpdated Blog - Full Article

Thursday, July 25, 2019

Horses are renowned for their ability to attract wounds. Under ideal conditions, surgical repair may lead to rapid (“first intention”) healing. However, wound breakdown is not uncommon, particularly in lower limb injuries. Factors such as infection and movement are significant problems.

Research from Israel suggests that applying medical grade honey to the wound, as it is repaired, may help control infection and reduce wound breakdown.

The study, from the Koret School of Veterinary Medicine, at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem, has been published in the Equine Veterinary Journal.

Eleven veterinarians were involved – between them treating 127 lacerations. Most wounds (30%) were on the lower limb. Upper limb wounds accounted for 28% and head wounds a further 24%.
Wounds were repaired using a standardised protocol, with some being chosen at random to have medical grade honey (MGH*) applied to the wound. (Medical grade honey has been sterilised by gamma radiation to eradicate any bacterial spores - such as Bacillus spp and Clostridium spp - that may be found in raw honey...)\

Read more here:
https://equinescienceupdate.blogspot.com/2019/07/repairing-wounds-with-honey.html

Sunday, August 04, 2019

Heat Exhaustion vs. Heat Stroke in Horses

Thehorse.com - Listen to the podcast

Do you know the difference? Dr. Jeanette Mero outlines the clinical signs of heat exhaustion and stroke in horses.

Posted by Jeanette "Jay" Mero, DVM | Jul 20, 2019

Listen to the podcast:
https://thehorse.com/176455/heat-exhaustion-vs-heat-stroke-in-horses/

What to do when your horse ties up

EquusMagazine.com - Full Article

If your horse develops severe muscle cramping, call your veterinarian, then keep him still and comfortable until help arrives.


LAURIE BONNERAPR 14, 2016

Bringing a horse back into condition after some time off must be done carefully: He needs to work up a sweat to gain fitness, but too much exertion increases the risk of several serious complications, including tying up.

Tying up, technically called exertional rhabdomyolysis, refers to severe cramping of the large muscles of the hindquarters, back and, sometimes, the shoulders during or after exercise. In some cases, damaged or dying muscle cells can release enough toxic debris into the bloodstream to stress the kidneys. Extreme cases may be fatal.

Repeated tying up occurs in horses with two specific disorders characterized by cellular dysfunctions in the muscles: polysaccharide storage myopathy (PSSM) and recurrent exertional rhabdomyolysis (RER). However, heat stress and/or electrolyte imbalances can cause virtually any horse who exerts himself to tie up under the right conditions. Here’s what to do...

Read more here:
https://equusmagazine.com/horse-world/tying-up-in-horses-32169?utm_source=EQUUSNL&%3Butm_medium=email&%3Butm_campaign=Newsletter&_hsenc=p2ANqtz-_q5V22spLfAp5qy2dUrMMQM79D64YzCG1xNtfnLnF7z52z5GocC_29bdL2B4SkxqbXxdSHzR1XJcEWTvCiIbAxLtqNkw&_hsmi=75177142

Saturday, August 03, 2019

Feeding Endurance Horses

Thehorse.com - Full Article

Feeding hard-working endurance horses is as much art as it is science. Our sources walk you through an endurance horse’s diet, from conditioning to post-race.

Posted by Heather Smith Thomas | Jul 22, 2019

Make sure your horse gets the energy, nutrients, and water he needs to tackle a long ride
Athletes need fuel to work. Endurance horses, in particular, need a nutrition strategy that will allow them to travel all day at moderate to high speeds without “running out of gas” or becoming dehydrated. They need adequate energy in a form that won’t produce excess body heat and will provide enough fluid and electrolytes to maintain hydration.

Julie Bullock, DVM, of Mount Sidney, Virginia, has been riding endurance horses for 25 years and competes in 100-mile races. She says the endurance community is growing fast, and it’s important for newcomers to the sport to understand these horses’ nutritional needs.

Kathleen Crandell, PhD, an equine nutritionist with Kentucky Equine Research, in Versailles, has extensive background in nutrition science and has trained and competed endurance horses. “When feeding an endurance horse, we think about two programs—feeding the horse on a daily basis as we get the horse into fitness, and then a plan for what we’ll feed the horse on the day of competition,” she says.

In this article our sources will walk you through an endurance horse’s diet, from conditioning to post-race...

Read more here:
https://thehorse.com/159337/feeding-endurance-horses/

Tuesday, July 30, 2019

Practical Electrolyte Use in Horses

Thehorse.com - Full Article

Electrolytes play an important role in hydration and cellular function in horses. Learn more about electrolytes, when you might need to supplement them, and what research has shown about how they affect performance horses in an excerpt of this article from our July 2019 issue of The Horse now.

Posted by Natalie DeFee Mendik, MA | Jul 22, 201

These minerals are key to hydration and cellular function
With the variety of human sports drinks on the market, almost everyone these days is familiar with electrolytes. But what are they, and what role do they play in equine health?

Electrolytes are components of salts (or mineral salts) that carry an electric charge (as ions) when dissolved in fluids. “About 2⁄3 of the horse’s body weight is fluid,” says Harold Schott, DVM, PhD, Dipl. ACVIM, professor at Michigan State University’s College of Veterinary Medicine, in East Lansing. “Water is the most abundant molecule in the body, whether horse or human; however, it’s not plain water—it’s a solution of water and electrolytes. Electrolytes make up a critical component of the horse’s total body fluid.”

These minerals include sodium, potassium, chloride, calcium, magnesium, and bicarbonate, says Michael Peralez, DVM, Tevis Cup head veterinarian and four-time finisher who runs a private practice in Arcadia, California. “They are involved in fluid balance, hydration, and nerve conduction,” he adds...

Read more here:
https://thehorse.com/176419/practical-electrolyte-use-in-horses/

Tuesday, July 23, 2019

Performers on horseback surprise passengers at Paris train station

Euronews.com - Watch the video

Performers on horseback roamed around a Paris train station on Sunday (July 21), passing through a waiting bar and performing stunts to the delight of hundreds of passengers.

The artistic performance, organised by Paris' Theatre of Centaur, features the story of two "centaurs", Camille and Manolo, who wander around the Gare de l'Est train station in search of each other.

The project, part of a series of summer cultural events organised by the French capital, aims to evoke the rich emotions that take place in a train station, including "happy reunions and painful separations," according to a news release for the performance.

Manolo said the performance aims to encourage the public to seek "symbiosis with nature" and to believe in "childhood dreams."

Watch the video at:
https://www.euronews.com/2019/07/22/performers-on-horseback-surprise-passengers-at-paris-train-station?utm_medium=40digest.7days3.20190723.home&utm_source=email&utm_content=&utm_campaign=campaign

A Parent’s Guide to Choosing a Horse for Their Child

EquineLegalSolutions.com - Full Article

At ELS, parents frequently ask us for advice on choosing a horse for their child. Here is what we tell them:

(1) Sign your child up for riding lessons. Enroll your child in regular riding lessons (at least once a week) with a reputable instructor who can provide horses for lessons. Look for a program that includes other children so your child has others his or her age to learn with and from.

(2) Join a horse club. Sign your child up to be a member of a local 4-H horse club or local chapter of the U.S. Pony Club. Both 4-H and Pony Club offer a wealth of opportunities for you and your child to learn about horses and develop horsemanship and leadership skills. They provide fun, safe, and encouraging environments and focus on teamwork and responsibility. These clubs are family-based organizations – as a parent, expect to volunteer and learn along with your child...

Read more here:
https://www.equinelegalsolutions.com/parents-guide.html

Monday, July 22, 2019

Dubai-based firm launches world's first cryotherapy cabin for racehorses

Khaleejtimes.com - Full Article

Staff Reporter /Dubai
Filed on July 22, 2019

A Dubai-based startup has been putting special focus on full-body cryotherapy cabins for competition horses and the results are already being seen.

Working from Dubai's Downtown, Revive offers a full range of professional cryotherapy equipment across the sports and wellness industries.

A world first, the research and development work for this equestrian cryo equipment was carried out by specialist engineers at the manufacturer's facilities in Finland.

Sateesh Seemar, head trainer at Zabeel Stables in Dubai, collaborated closely with the Revive team during the process, and personally supervised and monitored the first field trials in Dubai.

A cryotherapy session for a full grown racehorse lasts around five minutes, at temperatures as low as minus 140°celsius. Thermal imaging cameras are used to monitor the release of liquid nitrogen vapour, which is gently circulated around the horse's body...

Read more here:
https://www.khaleejtimes.com/sport/horse-racing/dubai-based-firm-launches-worlds-first-cryotherapy-cabin-for-racehorses

Sunday, July 21, 2019

The Horse Knows Best or How To Train a Race Horse

HorseReporter.com - Full Article

16/07/2019
by Pamela Burton

16 July 2019, USA ~ David and Tracy Kaden love their Arabian horses. Their ranch is on the West Texas, New Mexico border and the two have competed in endurance, trained their Anglo-Arabian to be a jumper, then in 2013 took up cowboy mounted shooting, each winning their divisions. After an intro into Extreme Cowboy events they decided that it was time for them to try Arabian racing, one sport they have watched with interest. Knowing that it takes long term commitment for the sport but feeling well prepared regarding nutrition, shoeing, hauling, and saddle fit, they are ready to compete. Kaden makes the horsesport-friendly Specialized Saddle and has now produced an exercise saddle using his patented fitting system. David tells us about his first foray into race horse training.

“I decided to try Arabian racing on a do it yourself basis. My wife helped me find some horses to buy. I went out to California to pick up an older gelding with several wins that I hoped to return to stakes class racing.

While there, I noticed a rangy looking mare in the pasture, and was told she was available for a reasonable price. I sent her pedigree (Djet Set De Falgas x Gizmoson Fire by Burning Sand) 2011, to my wife to approve and we decided to take her. I have had experience fixing problem horses. In fact when Tracy and I started our horse farm, we were sent problem horses from a local track. Some bucked, some flipped over, some ran away and some didn’t respond to the rein. We needed some income, so I climbed on some rank ones, and for the most part sent them back to the track very much improved.

As soon as we developed an endurance business I quit getting on broncs. So now many years later I took a chance on a mare that I assumed I could turn around, and make her into an Arabian racehorse. Her name is Sluffys Gizmo but her barn name is “GG”...

Read more here:
https://www.horsereporter.com/the-horse-knows-best-or-how-to-train-a-race-horse/

Saturday, July 20, 2019

Dealing With Equine Colic: Here are 33 Do's and Don’ts

Thehorse.com - Full Article

Do you know what to do–and just as importantly, what not to do–if your horse displays vague, mild, or serious signs of what might be colic? Your answer could save your horse’s life.

By Marcia King

The changes indicating colic were subtle but nevertheless concerning. Rufus, a Thoroughbred/Warmblood jumper, wasn’t himself, recalls owner Sydney Durieux of New York City. “Rufus was always attentive, playful almost, wrapping his neck around you and giving you a kind of hug, straining his neck to reach you,” she describes.
But that evening Rufus ignored Durieux and just stared, looking distracted and vaguely uncomfortable. “He wasn’t swaying, pawing, or looking at his stomach, but when the trainer listened to Rufus’ belly, she couldn’t detect any sounds,” she says.

After a half-hour, Durieux trailered him to a veterinary hospital an hour away. “Both the trainer and I thought we might be overreacting, but our hunch was right: The veterinarian said Rufus had colic and needed immediate surgery,” she says. “I was shocked, because every other horse I’d seen with colic had been very distressed.”

That’s the trouble with colic: You just can’t tell what you’re dealing with...

Read more here:
https://thehorse.com/features/dealing-with-equine-colic/

Podcast: How to Tell if Your Horse is Dehydrated

Thehorse.com - Listen

Posted by Jeanette "Jay" Mero, DVM | Jul 19, 2019

Dr. Jeanette Mero outlines the early warning signs of dehydration in horses and shares how much a horse should drink on a hot day.

Listen:
https://thehorse.com/176450/how-to-tell-if-your-horse-is-dehydrated/

Wednesday, July 17, 2019

Hoof Boots Market Future Forecast Indicates Impressive Growth Rate

TheGuardianTribune.com - Full Article

July 17, 2019
Laxman D

Equestrian Sport is a unique field that is an amalgamation of human athletes and animals working together as a team. Equestrian Sports consist of two disciplines i.e. equestrian and racing. Horse riding or horseback riding refers to the art of vaulting, steeple chasing, driving or riding a horse. As awareness about the sport is increasing, sales of accessories related to horseback riding, such as harness, saddle and hoof boots are also on the rise.

Market Overview:

Professionals who practice horse riding feel that hoof boots are excellent substitutes to the earlier used horseshoes. Hoof boots are often used as a backup either when the farrier is unavailable or in case of a thrown horseshoe or as hoof protection for a barefoot horse. The popularity of hoof boots is increasing in all disciplines of horse riding, particularly in endurance riding and trail riding. With the increasing demand, hoof boots are now available for every kind of horse playing any discipline of horse riding. Hoof boots are extremely necessary for horses that have recently been inducted into the sport, to protect their hoof from getting damaged in the uncomfortable terrains. Additionally, in some hoof boots, equine hoof pads are provided to ensure more comfort and additional support...

Read more here:
https://theguardiantribune.com/hoof-boots-market-future-forecast-indicates-impressive-growth-rate/"

Choosing Salt and Mineral Blocks for Horses

Thehorse.com - Full Article

Choosing between plain white salt blocks, red mineralized blocks, rock salt on ropes, and more can be challenging. Our nutritionist offers advice on the best way to supplement salt in your horse’s diet.

Posted by Clair Thunes, PhD | Jun 24, 2019

Q. I have been researching different types of salt and mineral blocks available for horses. I’m trying to determine if one kind is better than another, but there are quite a few different types! Is there one type I should choose over the others?

A. There are a large number of different types of salt and mineral blocks available at feed stores. Here in California, I most commonly see plain white salt blocks, red mineralized salt blocks, and rock salt on a rope. However, in certain parts of the country, other salt blocks that contain supplemental selenium, cobalt, or sulfur are common, as well.

Despite being visually quite different and having names that suggest significantly different nutritional compositions, all these salt sources have the similarity that they are all predominantly sodium chloride—more than 92% sodium chloride, based on the analysis I found...

Read more here:
https://thehorse.com/155743/choosing-salt-and-mineral-blocks-for-horses/

Sunday, July 14, 2019

Your DIY Camp Kitchen

Trailmeister.com - Full Article

June 14 2019
Your DIY Camp Kitchen Boxes

As published in the June, 2019 issue of Western Mule Magazine
by Robert Eversole

Morning coffee is the highlight of my day. But I don’t want the odors of breakfast to linger in the LQ. I needed a space to store my kitchen equipment, and a convenient area to prepare and cook my meals. I’ve seen lots of chuck / kitchen boxes over the years and they all seemed lacking and terribly expensive. So, I designed my own DIY camp kitchen to fulfill my needs and wants at much less expense.

My Top Requirements:

– In my opinion boxes that are permanently fixed to the sides of trailers are hazardous. I don’t want anything obstructing my rear view when driving. And I just may need that extra few inches when I turn into a parking area. Finding this inside storage space was a bigger challenge than I anticipated. I wanted the boxes to be safely secured when in motion, out of the LQ area, and safely away from the ponies...

Read more here:
https://www.trailmeister.com/your-diy-camp-kitchen/?utm_source=MailingList&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=July+2019+general

Reduce Trailering Stress – Keep Your Cool When Traveling With Horses

Trailmeister.com - Full Article

As Published in the July, 2011, issue of The Northwest Horse Source.
by Robert Eversole

Summer is officially here, and in spite of high fuel prices, trail riders are hitting the highways in large numbers to haul their horses, and mules, to “work” as they travel to that perfect riding destination. In my last article we discussed the fundamentals of trailer maintenance and how to check your equine partner’s travel accommodations for safety. Let’s expand on that topic and talk about how to create an equine friendly environment while we roll over the blacktop. There are several topics to discuss around trailering such as; front or slant load, bumper pull or goose neck, step up or ramp, tie or not tie, and more, but today we’ll narrow our focus and concentrate on two factors; dealing with heat and driving styles. Regardless of how far we haul we’re asking a lot of our horses and we’re creating stress on them in several ways; from the stress of heat to the stresses of being bounced around inside a trailer.

Dealing with heat – Most horses’ comfort range is between 30 to 75 degrees depending upon the breed. While this is a wide temperature range consider the wide range of horse breeds from cold loving Icelandics to thin coated Arabians. They each have adapted to different environments. Now consider the trailer and how hot it can become on a warm sunny (think perfect riding weather) day. Studies have shown that temperatures inside trailers can easily be 10 to 15 degrees greater than outside temperatures. That perfect 80 degree day just became a hot and humid 95 plus degrees inside the trailer. In order to ease heat stress on your animals you can take the following precautions...

Read more here:
https://www.trailmeister.com/reduce-trailering-stress-keep-your-cool-when-traveling-with-horses/?utm_source=MailingList&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=July+2019+general

Saturday, July 13, 2019

Fire destroys part of historic French National Stud

Horseandhound.co.uk - Full Article

Sarah Radford
12 July, 2019 17:04

A fire that broke out overnight on 11-12 July has destroyed part of the historic French National Stud of St Lo (Haras National de Saint-lo).

A statement on the Pole Hippique Saint-lo Facebook page said a rider living on site had spotted the outbreak of the fire in stable block number three at around midnight.

All 22 horses in the block were evacuated safely, with vets reporting no injuries from the blaze.

“Neighbours and professionals from around the stud all mobilised spontaneously and offered their help and the 22 horses were quickly evacuated and put safe before the spread of the fire to stable number four. No one was hurt in the disaster,” the statement said...

Read more here:
https://www.horseandhound.co.uk/news/fire-destroys-part-historic-french-national-stud-691689

Thursday, July 11, 2019

Mountain Bikes on Horse Trails? No Problem if You’re Prepared

Thehorse.com - Full Article

Introduce horses systematically to bikes, hikers, backpackers, strollers, and ATVs to reduce spooking on the trail.

Posted by Robin Foster, PhD, CHBC, Cert. AAB, IAABC | Jul 4, 2019

Few things are more enjoyable than riding through the forest, coming around a bend in the path, and having the sky open to a breathtaking mountain vista. But, today, equestrians are sharing the trail with a growing number of outdoor enthusiasts, and a rider might instead come around a bend in the path to encounter a group of day hikers or off-road cyclists. This has led many rider to seek advice on how to prepare for encounters with mountain bikes on horse trails.
In urban equestrian areas, off-leash dogs and baby buggies are often as common as horses. These unfamiliar, fast-moving, and loud objects can frighten horses, causing them to startle, panic, rear, or bolt.

A few strategies can help prepare your horse for these contemporary trail obstacles and increase safety...

Read more here:
https://thehorse.com/110581/mountain-bikes-on-horse-trails/

FEI Set to Eject the Discipline of Reining at the End of 2019

Horse-canada.com - Full Article

July 9, 2019 | Comments
by: Pippa Cuckson

Reining has just months left as an FEI sport, with news that the General Assembly in November will be asked to “remove” reining from the FEI portfolio from January 1, 2020.

This will be the first time the FEI has ever ejected a discipline – having obtained stronger powers to do so last year.

The writing was on the wall in November 2018 when the FEI ceased its cooperation agreements with the National Reining Horse Association and the American Quarter Horse Association.

Main areas of concern were the three bodies’ diverse opinions over minimum horse ages, stewarding and anti-doping policy, and the “money-driven” approach of NRHA compared with the FEI’s “performance-based” ideals...

Read more here:
https://horse-canada.com/horse-news/fei-set-eject-reining-end-2019/?utm_medium=40digest.7days3.20190710.home&utm_source=email&utm_content=&utm_campaign=campaign

Tuesday, July 09, 2019

Horse Owner Liability Checklist

EquineLegalSolutions.com - Full Article

​Horse ownership is a joy, whether you’re hitting the trails, heading to horse shows, or galloping along a beach. But is potential liability lurking in the shadows, just waiting to ruin the fun? Go through this quick checklist and find out before it’s too late.

If You Own a Horse

√ You have reviewed your insurance policies and are confident you’ll be covered if your horse injures or kills a person or another horse, or causes property damage, no matter where the incident takes place.

Why this matters: If you are sued and don’t have insurance to pay for your legal defense, you could easily spend tens of thousands of dollars to defend yourself, with no hope of getting your money back, even if you ultimately prevail in the lawsuit.

If You Let Friends or Family Ride or Handle Your Horses

√ You have a good-quality liability release designed for letting friends and family ride and handle your horses, and you have them sign it before they come anywhere near your horses. And if any friends or family members are under 18, you have their parent or guardian sign a liability release that includes an indemnification provision.

Why this matters: While you’d certainly like to think your friends and family wouldn’t sue you if your horses injured them, you won’t really know for certain until and unless it happens...

Read more at:
https://www.equinelegalsolutions.com/horse-owner-liability-checklist.html