Wednesday, July 17, 2019

Hoof Boots Market Future Forecast Indicates Impressive Growth Rate

TheGuardianTribune.com - Full Article

July 17, 2019
Laxman D

Equestrian Sport is a unique field that is an amalgamation of human athletes and animals working together as a team. Equestrian Sports consist of two disciplines i.e. equestrian and racing. Horse riding or horseback riding refers to the art of vaulting, steeple chasing, driving or riding a horse. As awareness about the sport is increasing, sales of accessories related to horseback riding, such as harness, saddle and hoof boots are also on the rise.

Market Overview:

Professionals who practice horse riding feel that hoof boots are excellent substitutes to the earlier used horseshoes. Hoof boots are often used as a backup either when the farrier is unavailable or in case of a thrown horseshoe or as hoof protection for a barefoot horse. The popularity of hoof boots is increasing in all disciplines of horse riding, particularly in endurance riding and trail riding. With the increasing demand, hoof boots are now available for every kind of horse playing any discipline of horse riding. Hoof boots are extremely necessary for horses that have recently been inducted into the sport, to protect their hoof from getting damaged in the uncomfortable terrains. Additionally, in some hoof boots, equine hoof pads are provided to ensure more comfort and additional support...

Read more here:
https://theguardiantribune.com/hoof-boots-market-future-forecast-indicates-impressive-growth-rate/"

Choosing Salt and Mineral Blocks for Horses

Thehorse.com - Full Article

Choosing between plain white salt blocks, red mineralized blocks, rock salt on ropes, and more can be challenging. Our nutritionist offers advice on the best way to supplement salt in your horse’s diet.

Posted by Clair Thunes, PhD | Jun 24, 2019

Q. I have been researching different types of salt and mineral blocks available for horses. I’m trying to determine if one kind is better than another, but there are quite a few different types! Is there one type I should choose over the others?

A. There are a large number of different types of salt and mineral blocks available at feed stores. Here in California, I most commonly see plain white salt blocks, red mineralized salt blocks, and rock salt on a rope. However, in certain parts of the country, other salt blocks that contain supplemental selenium, cobalt, or sulfur are common, as well.

Despite being visually quite different and having names that suggest significantly different nutritional compositions, all these salt sources have the similarity that they are all predominantly sodium chloride—more than 92% sodium chloride, based on the analysis I found...

Read more here:
https://thehorse.com/155743/choosing-salt-and-mineral-blocks-for-horses/

Sunday, July 14, 2019

Your DIY Camp Kitchen

Trailmeister.com - Full Article

June 14 2019
Your DIY Camp Kitchen Boxes

As published in the June, 2019 issue of Western Mule Magazine
by Robert Eversole

Morning coffee is the highlight of my day. But I don’t want the odors of breakfast to linger in the LQ. I needed a space to store my kitchen equipment, and a convenient area to prepare and cook my meals. I’ve seen lots of chuck / kitchen boxes over the years and they all seemed lacking and terribly expensive. So, I designed my own DIY camp kitchen to fulfill my needs and wants at much less expense.

My Top Requirements:

– In my opinion boxes that are permanently fixed to the sides of trailers are hazardous. I don’t want anything obstructing my rear view when driving. And I just may need that extra few inches when I turn into a parking area. Finding this inside storage space was a bigger challenge than I anticipated. I wanted the boxes to be safely secured when in motion, out of the LQ area, and safely away from the ponies...

Read more here:
https://www.trailmeister.com/your-diy-camp-kitchen/?utm_source=MailingList&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=July+2019+general

Reduce Trailering Stress – Keep Your Cool When Traveling With Horses

Trailmeister.com - Full Article

As Published in the July, 2011, issue of The Northwest Horse Source.
by Robert Eversole

Summer is officially here, and in spite of high fuel prices, trail riders are hitting the highways in large numbers to haul their horses, and mules, to “work” as they travel to that perfect riding destination. In my last article we discussed the fundamentals of trailer maintenance and how to check your equine partner’s travel accommodations for safety. Let’s expand on that topic and talk about how to create an equine friendly environment while we roll over the blacktop. There are several topics to discuss around trailering such as; front or slant load, bumper pull or goose neck, step up or ramp, tie or not tie, and more, but today we’ll narrow our focus and concentrate on two factors; dealing with heat and driving styles. Regardless of how far we haul we’re asking a lot of our horses and we’re creating stress on them in several ways; from the stress of heat to the stresses of being bounced around inside a trailer.

Dealing with heat – Most horses’ comfort range is between 30 to 75 degrees depending upon the breed. While this is a wide temperature range consider the wide range of horse breeds from cold loving Icelandics to thin coated Arabians. They each have adapted to different environments. Now consider the trailer and how hot it can become on a warm sunny (think perfect riding weather) day. Studies have shown that temperatures inside trailers can easily be 10 to 15 degrees greater than outside temperatures. That perfect 80 degree day just became a hot and humid 95 plus degrees inside the trailer. In order to ease heat stress on your animals you can take the following precautions...

Read more here:
https://www.trailmeister.com/reduce-trailering-stress-keep-your-cool-when-traveling-with-horses/?utm_source=MailingList&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=July+2019+general

Saturday, July 13, 2019

Fire destroys part of historic French National Stud

Horseandhound.co.uk - Full Article

Sarah Radford
12 July, 2019 17:04

A fire that broke out overnight on 11-12 July has destroyed part of the historic French National Stud of St Lo (Haras National de Saint-lo).

A statement on the Pole Hippique Saint-lo Facebook page said a rider living on site had spotted the outbreak of the fire in stable block number three at around midnight.

All 22 horses in the block were evacuated safely, with vets reporting no injuries from the blaze.

“Neighbours and professionals from around the stud all mobilised spontaneously and offered their help and the 22 horses were quickly evacuated and put safe before the spread of the fire to stable number four. No one was hurt in the disaster,” the statement said...

Read more here:
https://www.horseandhound.co.uk/news/fire-destroys-part-historic-french-national-stud-691689

Thursday, July 11, 2019

Mountain Bikes on Horse Trails? No Problem if You’re Prepared

Thehorse.com - Full Article

Introduce horses systematically to bikes, hikers, backpackers, strollers, and ATVs to reduce spooking on the trail.

Posted by Robin Foster, PhD, CHBC, Cert. AAB, IAABC | Jul 4, 2019

Few things are more enjoyable than riding through the forest, coming around a bend in the path, and having the sky open to a breathtaking mountain vista. But, today, equestrians are sharing the trail with a growing number of outdoor enthusiasts, and a rider might instead come around a bend in the path to encounter a group of day hikers or off-road cyclists. This has led many rider to seek advice on how to prepare for encounters with mountain bikes on horse trails.
In urban equestrian areas, off-leash dogs and baby buggies are often as common as horses. These unfamiliar, fast-moving, and loud objects can frighten horses, causing them to startle, panic, rear, or bolt.

A few strategies can help prepare your horse for these contemporary trail obstacles and increase safety...

Read more here:
https://thehorse.com/110581/mountain-bikes-on-horse-trails/

FEI Set to Eject the Discipline of Reining at the End of 2019

Horse-canada.com - Full Article

July 9, 2019 | Comments
by: Pippa Cuckson

Reining has just months left as an FEI sport, with news that the General Assembly in November will be asked to “remove” reining from the FEI portfolio from January 1, 2020.

This will be the first time the FEI has ever ejected a discipline – having obtained stronger powers to do so last year.

The writing was on the wall in November 2018 when the FEI ceased its cooperation agreements with the National Reining Horse Association and the American Quarter Horse Association.

Main areas of concern were the three bodies’ diverse opinions over minimum horse ages, stewarding and anti-doping policy, and the “money-driven” approach of NRHA compared with the FEI’s “performance-based” ideals...

Read more here:
https://horse-canada.com/horse-news/fei-set-eject-reining-end-2019/?utm_medium=40digest.7days3.20190710.home&utm_source=email&utm_content=&utm_campaign=campaign

Tuesday, July 09, 2019

Horse Owner Liability Checklist

EquineLegalSolutions.com - Full Article

​Horse ownership is a joy, whether you’re hitting the trails, heading to horse shows, or galloping along a beach. But is potential liability lurking in the shadows, just waiting to ruin the fun? Go through this quick checklist and find out before it’s too late.

If You Own a Horse

√ You have reviewed your insurance policies and are confident you’ll be covered if your horse injures or kills a person or another horse, or causes property damage, no matter where the incident takes place.

Why this matters: If you are sued and don’t have insurance to pay for your legal defense, you could easily spend tens of thousands of dollars to defend yourself, with no hope of getting your money back, even if you ultimately prevail in the lawsuit.

If You Let Friends or Family Ride or Handle Your Horses

√ You have a good-quality liability release designed for letting friends and family ride and handle your horses, and you have them sign it before they come anywhere near your horses. And if any friends or family members are under 18, you have their parent or guardian sign a liability release that includes an indemnification provision.

Why this matters: While you’d certainly like to think your friends and family wouldn’t sue you if your horses injured them, you won’t really know for certain until and unless it happens...

Read more at:
https://www.equinelegalsolutions.com/horse-owner-liability-checklist.html

Monday, July 08, 2019

Study Confirms Horses ‘Talk’ to Human Handlers

Thehorse.com - Full Article

New research has revealed that horses do, in fact, try to intentionally communicate with us to achieve certain goals.

Posted by Christa Lesté-Lasserre, MA | Jun 9, 2016

“Hey! See that bucket of feed over there? Yeah, that one. Can you grab that for me, please? I’m kind of hungry.”
Wait a minute. Did your horse just speak to you? Actually, he might have—in his own way, of course. New research by European scientists has revealed that horses do, in fact, try to intentionally communicate with us to achieve certain goals.

In their pioneering study, researchers have determined for the first time that horses are capable of heterospecific referential communication—essentially, the ability to communicate about something, specifically to someone else. More precisely, to us.

So does that mean our horses actually “talk” to us?...

Read more here:
https://thehorse.com/17891/study-confirms-horses-talk-to-human-handlers/

Saturday, July 06, 2019

Create a Trail Riding Survival Kit

EquusMagazine.com - Full Article

Whether you're riding familiar trails or exploring new territory, a trail survival kit can help you handle emergencies.

CHRISTINE BARAKAT
JUN 21, 2019

So you're not the rugged, survivalist type. You're not alone. It's a fact of 21st century life that fewer and fewer people are experienced in surviving in the great outdoors. Moseying on horseback through the local park on a sunny Saturday may be the closest some of us ever get to a wilderness adventure.

Yet even on a familiar trail a mishap can occur that could ruin your fun or, worse, get someone hurt. Serious accidents on trail rides are rare, but venturing from the security of home on horseback always poses a certain amount of risk. Changing weather, wildlife, the limitations of your own sense of direction--many potential hazards can sour what should be a pleasurable ride. Even on a short jaunt, an injury to yourself or your horse can isolate you, forcing you to rely on your own resources--reason enough to plan ahead and prepare for the unexpected...

Read more here:
https://equusmagazine.com/riding/trail-riding-survival-kit-8300?utm_source=EQUUSNL&%3Butm_medium=email&%3Butm_campaign=Newsletter&_hsenc=p2ANqtz--wFYKQanyxqcXdzscnMFq9GO1yX8EFD2Lcqxu5KzTDIDfFYWlBMB-KDfisUi9fy4B_uiqMh0ZbP56cuTC6ASqY0Cb6ug&_hsmi=74330068

Monday, July 01, 2019

Feeding the Anaerobic Equine Athlete

Thehorse.com - Full Article

How do you build a nutritional program that supports your high-­intensity equine athlete? Three experts share their advice in this article from the June 2019 issue of The Horse. Read an excerpt now.

Posted by Katie Navarra | Jun 28, 2019

At the National Cutting Horse Association World Championship Futurity, the final seconds of competition can determine the champion. The winning horse stays with the last cow, preventing it from returning to the herd. Another horse loses its last cow just before the buzzer sounds, only to go home without placing. In many cases, the latter horse has simply run out of gas, says Karen Davison, PhD, an equine nutritionist and director of equine technical solutions for Purina Animal Nutrition, in Gray Summit, Missouri.

“Both horses are incredibly talented elite athletes,” she says. “One just didn’t have enough energy to sustain the high-intensity workout and make that final big move to hold the cow.”

Nutrition in the form of fats and carbohydrates (sugars, starches) is the fuel that sustains performance. However, the body uses these energy sources differently depending on a workout’s duration and intensity. Take aerobic exercise, for instance: During this longer-lasting, lower-intensity work such as endurance riding, the muscle tissues use oxygen to convert fat into energy...

Read more here:
https://thehorse.com/174529/feeding-the-anaerobic-equine-athlete/

Sunday, June 30, 2019

A Horse Race Without A Horse: How Modern Trail Ultramarathoning Was Invented

WBUR.org - Full Article or Listen

June 28, 2019
Karen Given

Stop me if you’ve heard this one before: the modern-day sport of trail ultramarathoning began 45 years ago when a man showed up to a 100-mile horse race — without a horse.

An ultramarathon is defined as anything longer than 26.2 miles. And it’s true — tens of thousands of people every year run 50, 100 and even 1,000 miles over rough terrain because of that man and his nonexistent horse.

But the story of ultramarathoning actually begins with another man — named Wendell Robie — and another horse.

The Western States 100

"Wendell's a little guy," says Gordon Ainsleigh, who most people call Gordy. "He's strong, he's wiry and he wears cowboy boots. Well, he doesn't anymore. He died in ’84."

Gordy was a friend of Wendell’s back in the day.

In 1954, Wendell was camping with the Sacramento Horsemen’s Association at Robinson Flat, 30 miles west of Lake Tahoe. Gordy recalls sitting around the campfire on the last night of the trip...

Read more or listen here:
https://www.wbur.org/onlyagame/2019/06/28/ultramarathon-gordon-ainsleigh-western-states

Friday, June 28, 2019

Everything You Need to Know About the Western States 100-Mile Endurance Run

RunnersWorld.com - Full Article

A snowy winter will not detour the 2019 race. Here’s what to expect—and how you can follow along.


By PAIGE TRIOLA
JUN 27, 2019

The 2019 Western States 100-Mile Endurance Run, which is known for being one of the hardest races in the country, will begin on June 29.

Past winners Jim Walmsley and Courtney Dauwalter will be back to challenge for victory again this year.

You can follow along with the race with live updates on ultralive.net, through Google Assistant or Amazon Alexa, or by checking the live finish feed on the race’s Facebook page.

Known for being one of the most difficult organized running events in the country—and the oldest 100-mile trail race in the world—the Western States 100-Mile Endurance Run is a worthy challenge for any runner ambitious enough to take it on. Here’s everything you need to know about the 2019 race, its entry process, and what to expect from the course.

How to Watch the Western States Endurance Run

The 2019 Western States 100-Mile Endurance Run will be held on Saturday, June 29, and runners will have until Sunday, June 30 to finish.

There are a few ways to follow along with the race, race director Craig Thornley told Runner’s World...

Read more at:
https://www.runnersworld.com/races-places/a28208082/how-to-watch-western-states-100-mile-endurance-run/

Help Gastric Ulcers with Frequent Feedings

KER.com - Full Article

June 6, 2019
By Kentucky Equine Research Staff

Many performance horses have ulcerations of the stomach that can hinder performance and well-being. Did you know that broodmares and lightly ridden horses are also at risk? According to veterinarians and researchers, one contributing factor to equine gastric ulcer syndrome, or EGUS, involves feeding management strategies, including lack of free feeding.

“Free feeding of performance horses or those maintained primarily in individual stalls is not a realistic option, compared to horses on pasture that will graze for 10-15 hours a day,” shared Kathleen Crandell, Ph.D., a nutritionist for Kentucky Equine Research.

For most performance horses, simply offering more hay will not provide sufficient energy, necessitating the addition of a concentrate to the diet. Typically, these grain meals are offered twice daily.

One viable alternative to this feeding dilemma, according to a recently published study*, involves using an automated feeder programmed to deliver 20 small grain meals spread over a 24-hour period...

Read more at:
https://ker.com/equinews/help-gastric-ulcers-with-frequent-feedings/?partner=ker&utm_source=KER+Newsletter&utm_campaign=be6fee2903-KER_Equinews_062619&utm_medium=email&utm_term=0_0d95781dfc-be6fee2903-11166

Monday, June 24, 2019

Heather Wallace Releases New Book, Girl Forward, about Her Travels to Mongolia

June 19 2019

Girl Forward is the tale of one woman’s adventures traveling to work for an equestrian event in Mongolia. Heather Wallace is an unlikely adventurer and a timid rider. A mother of three and a small business owner, she has little time to explore the world the way she did in her younger years. When the opportunity arose to work for The Gobi Desert Cup, an endurance horse race in Mongolia, she took a risk learning about herself and changing her life forever.


“You did what? Where?”

When I tell people I traveled to Mongolia to photograph a horse race, there is often confusion. Even my friends and family struggled to understand.

I was a mother of three struggling to build a business for myself. However, when I had the opportunity to travel across the world for several weeks away from everything and everyone I loved, I jumped at the chance and left it all behind for a while.

The Gobi Desert Cup, an endurance horse race over 480 kilometers in six days, on Mongolian horses sought a writer and photographer to attend their event, and that was going to be me.

I don’t camp, I don’t typically take risks, and I don’t speak Mongolian. I never doubted for a second that I needed to be part of this experience. I knew from the very start this would be a journey of self-discovery.

I didn’t know it would change my life.”

Already a winner of the Reader’s Favorite 5-Star award, the critics note, “Heather Wallace’s love of animals, especially horses, is clearly shown throughout Girl Forward: A Tale of One Woman’s Unlikely Adventure in Mongolia, with her enthusiasm for the Mongolian breed being contagious. The hazards of the adventure and the difficulties (including the security screening problems at Beijing Airport) encountered in reaching and returning from the destination (Ulaanbaatar) should sound familiar to many a seasoned traveler.”


Girl Forward: A Tale of One Woman’s Unlikely Adventure in Mongolia

By Heather Wallace

Published by Water Horse Press

Copyright 2019, All rights reserved.

$7.99 US Kindle Ebook; $16.99 US Paperback

Publication date: June 19, 2019. Available for purchase at:

https://www.amazon.com/Girl-Forward-Unlikely-Adventure-Mongolia-ebook/dp/B07RSXZ1NK/



About the Author

Heather Wallace is a certified equine and canine sports massage therapist working with animals by day and writing about them by night. She is known for her blog about confidence at The Timid Rider.

Her first book, Equestrian Handbook of Excuses, was a 2017 Literary Selection for the Equus Film Festival and is a humorous look at the excuses we tell ourselves why we can’t ride that day. Her second book, Confessions of a Timid Rider, details her insights about being an anxiety-ridden but passionate equestrian and writer. It was both an Amazon #1 Hot New Release and won the Equus Film Festival Winnie Award for Non-Fiction.

Heather wears many hats and is exceptionally proud to be an example to her three daughters of a woman who follows her passion and takes risks. Heather is every woman who decided to leave her fears behind and do what she loves.

In her spare time, of which she has little, she spends her time with her husband, three children, two dogs, and pony.

Follow her on social media @timidrider or at timidrider.com. Please contact Heather if you would like a review copy, or you are interested in an interview.


About The Gobi Desert Cup

Co-founded in 2016 by FEI 3* Endurance Rider, Camille Champagne, the Gobi Desert Cup is a 480-kilometer equestrian adventure through the Gobi Desert, riding Mongolian horses every day for six days over 50 miles. This challenge is the only one of its kind to combine endurance while positively supporting Mongolian nomadic culture and their horses before, during, and after the event.

Sunday, June 23, 2019

Officials: Increased Risk for WNV in California Horses Near Wildfire Zones

TheHorse.com - Full Article

Butte County public health officials say they’re concerned about an increased number of mosquitoes capable of transmitting WNV due to late-season rainstorms and more breeding sites in the 2018 Camp Fire burn zone.

Posted by Edited Press Release | May 31, 2019

California public health officials are encouraging owners to vaccinated horses against West Nile virus (WNV), a mosquito-borne illness transmitted to animals and people via a bite from an infected mosquito. In 2018, there were 11 confirmed cases of WNV in California horses. Six of the affected horses (54.5%) died or were euthanized.

Butte County Public Health and the Butte County Mosquito and Vector Control District announced May 29 that they’re concerned about an increase in the number of mosquitoes capable of transmitting WNV in Butte County due to late-season rainstorms and more mosquito breeding sites in the Camp Fire burn zone.

In Butte County, WNV season runs June through October, the groups said...

Read more here:
https://thehorse.com/173543/officials-increased-risk-for-wnv-in-california-horses-near-wildfire-zones/

Equine Electrolyte Supplements: Three Tips

KER.com - Full Article

July 18, 2018 By Kentucky Equine Research Staff

The sweat that froths and drips from your horse is laced with electrolytes. Profound electrolyte losses occur in exercising horses, often necessitating an electrolyte supplement for optimal athletic performance. Which supplement should you choose, and how much should you offer to ensure electrolytes are being adequately replaced?

“Electrolyte supplements help replace ions lost in sweat during exercise, predominantly sodium, chloride, potassium, and magnesium. Those ions play important roles in an extensive array of metabolic processes, including those involved in nerve and muscle function, and the flow of nutrients into and waste products out of cells,” explained Kathleen Crandell, Ph.D., a Kentucky Equine Research nutritionist...

Read more here:
https://ker.com/equinews/equine-electrolyte-supplements-three-tips/?utm_source=KER+Newsletter&utm_campaign=c889f961f5-Focus_on_Electrolytes&utm_medium=email&utm_term=0_0d95781dfc-c889f961f5-11166

Saturday, June 22, 2019

The Long Haul: Traveling Long-Distances With Horses

Thehorse.com - Full Article

A U.S. Equestrian Team veterinarian who has overseen the shipping of horses to six Olympic Games shares what steps to take before, during, and after a long-distance trailer ride.

Posted by Alayne Blickle | Jun 12, 2019

Steps to take before, during, and after a long-distance trailer ride

Sarah Burris bought a lovely young cowhorse from Idaho in an online sale. There was only one problem: She lives in North Carolina and needed to ship the filly across the country to get her home. The filly was sensitive and not a good eater to begin with, says Burris. As a result, she arrived underweight, depressed, slightly dehydrated, and sporting a snotty nose.

Many owners ship horses all over the country these days, whether to attend competitions or relocate. Some haul their horses themselves, while others hire carriers to do the job.

Regardless of who’s behind the steering wheel, long trailer rides are associated with many stresses, including temperature extremes and humidity, flies and other insects, air quality issues, and potential exhaustion, dehydration, and disease exposure. So what should you do if you are preparing a horse for a long haul?...

Read more here:
https://thehorse.com/158895/the-long-haul-traveling-long-distances-with-horses/

Not Your Average Equine Ulcer

Thehorse.com - Full Article

Gastric disease develops most commonly in the squamous region, when stomach acid splashes onto that vulnerable area of tissue. Why it develops in the glandular region—and how to prevent and treat it—is less clear. In the June 2019 issue of The Horse, five researchers discuss what we do know about equine glandular gastric disease. Read an excerpt now.

Posted by Alexandra Beckstett, The Horse Managing Editor | Jun 4, 2019

What scientists are learning about the recently defined equine glandular gastric disease

Gastric ulcers are nearly ubiquitous in our domestic equine population. We know they plague anywhere from 50% to 90% of horses, particularly performance horses. But not all ulcers are created equal. In the past few years researchers officially split gastric disease into two categories: squamous, affecting the upper portion of the horse’s stomach, and glandular, a nonulcerative condition affecting the lower. Gastric disease develops most commonly in the squamous region, when stomach acid splashes onto that vulnerable area of tissue. Why it develops in the glandular region—and how to prevent and treat it—is less clear.

At the 2018 British Equine Veterinary Association Congress, five researchers discussed what we do know about equine glandular gastric disease (EGGD). Here are their key takeaways...

Read more here:
https://thehorse.com/173644/not-your-average-equine-ulcer/

Friday, June 21, 2019

Levels of a protein in Endurance horses could point to overtraining – study

Horsetalk.co.nz - Full Article

June 21, 2019 Horsetalk.co.nz

The measurement of serum amyloid A in the blood of Endurance horses might be a useful indicator of overtraining, the findings of a study suggest.

Serum amyloid A is an acute-phase protein made mostly in the liver. It has several roles, including the recruitment of immune cells to areas of inflammation.

Olga Witkowska-Piłaszewicz and her colleagues, writing in the journal Animals, said sport training in horses led to adaptations linked to physical effort that are reflected by the changes in blood parameters.

Blood testing is accepted as a support tool in the training of endurance horses, the study team from Poland said...

Read more here:
https://www.horsetalk.co.nz/2019/06/21/levels-protein-endurance-horses-overtraining-study/

Thursday, June 20, 2019

Electrolytes Vital for Performance Horses

KER.com - Full Article

June 2, 2017
By Kentucky Equine Research Staff

More than one horse owner has asked herself this simple question, “Why don’t feed manufacturers put electrolytes in feed specifically designed for performance horses?” According to Joe Pagan, Ph.D., founder and owner of Kentucky Equine Research (KER), this is a reasonable question but one that is easily answered.

“A horse’s energy requirement stays the same during consistent work,” explained Pagan, “but sweat losses change with weather, work intensity, and other factors. Horse owners need to be able to easily adjust the amount of electrolyte given based on sweat production.”

The two most common questions Pagan addresses about electrolyte supplements include what type of product is best and how much electrolyte should be fed.

In selecting a product, Pagan advocates simplicity. “Pick an electrolyte that is salty. A lot of electrolytes are full of sugar. The horse may love it, but it doesn’t have a lot of electrolyte in it,” he said. “Look at the label, find one that has sodium, chloride, and potassium as the primary ingredients...”

Read more here:
https://ker.com/equinews/electrolytes-vital-performance-horses/?utm_source=KER+Newsletter&utm_campaign=c889f961f5-Focus_on_Electrolytes&utm_medium=email&utm_term=0_0d95781dfc-c889f961f5-11166

Tuesday, June 18, 2019

Got Healthy Hooves? Here’s How to Keep Them That Way

TheHorse.com - Full Article

Posted by Heather Smith Thomas | May 22, 2019

Consider the big picture, from farrier care and diet to environment and genetics, when working to keep horse hooves healthy
My horse is barefoot. And sound. And his feet look pretty great, if you ask me. What can I do to keep them this way? Are there special products I should be using or certain ways I should be managing them? What if someday he needs shoes?

These are just a few of the many questions horse owners ask about their horses’ feet. They’ve heard about or have managed less-ideal feet, so it’s only natural to want to keep things going the way they are and stave off problems. We gathered advice from two farriers on how to have the healthiest of hooves, with or without shoes.

Paul Goodness, CJF, a farrier at the Virginia-Maryland College of Veterinary Medicine’s (VMCVM) Marion duPont Scott Equine Medical Center, in Leesburg, Virginia, says horses’ feet are fairly resilient and can adapt to many conditions, but sometimes they need a little help. Travis Burns, CJF, TE, EE, FWCF, assistant professor of practice and chief of farrier services at the VMCVM, agrees, and says horse owners can do many things to help their horses maintain healthy hoof capsules...

Read more here:
https://thehorse.com/19088/got-healthy-hooves-heres-how-to-keep-them-that-way/

Pony Express riders arrive at Fort Churchill, Carson City, Genoa and Tahoe this Wednesday

CarsonNow.org - Full Article

Submitted by Jeff Munson on Sun, 06/16/2019

Imagine you live in the year 1860 with vast wilderness, wide-open plains and high desert between Missouri and California. You're one of the chosen riders on top of a horse with a mochila strapped on your saddle, navigating along the trail where unknown dangers may be ahead.

You're not on a leisure trip, you're one of a team of boys and young men traveling 1,966 miles in 10 days on horseback, delivering mail to and from the West.

Even though the Pony Express lasted just 18 months (having been replaced by the transcontinental telegraph line that started just 10 weeks after the Pony Express began), the lore and legend live on. In its short history, the Pony Express has become synonymous with the Old West. In the era before easy mass communication, the Pony Express was the thread that tied East to West...

Read more here:
https://www.carsonnow.org/story/06/16/2019/pony-express-riders-arrive-fort-churchill-carson-city-genoa-and-tahoe-wednesday?fbclid=IwAR2qJoMGSbTM_1PRcvHGsLm5kkZe5-vi72xsJAfJNhekrsAjRbcIpbqYn48

Saturday, June 15, 2019

USEF and ADS Unable to Reach Agreement After Initial Affiliate Agreement Concludes

USEF.org

by US Equestrian Communications Department | Jun 11, 2019, 10:30 AM EST

Lexington, Ky. - In January of 2017, the USEF terminated its relationship with the American Driving Society (ADS) because that organization was unwilling to reach an agreement regarding its responsibilities as the Recognized Affiliate for the Driving discipline. In May of 2017, the ADS and USEF were able to reach agreement on key issues including competition licensing, licensed officials, anti-doping efforts and a continued commitment to work together to grow the driving discipline. These efforts resulted in the reinstatement of ADS as the Recognized Affiliate until the end of November 2018, at which point the two organizations would meet again to determine the path forward and renew the Affiliate Agreement.

Unfortunately, after the initial Affiliate Agreement expired, and despite continued negotiating through repeated extensions of the Agreement, the two organizations could not come to an agreement and have agreed it is in the best interest of both organizations to part ways. As the current Agreement is expired, this decision is effective immediately.

“Recognized Affiliate Association status offers significant benefits, but also comes with great responsibility,” stated USEF Chief Executive Officer Bill Moroney. “Relationships between the USEF and its Recognized Affiliates must be mutually beneficial in order to best serve the needs of the horses, athletes and the sport of equestrian. In today’s environment, there are higher requirements to ensure fairness and safety, added scrutiny, and increased exposure associated with operating as an amateur sports organization and this can create challenges. USEF is uniquely positioned to assist our Affiliates in meeting those challenges so we can all enjoy a safe environment.”

Moroney continued: “We recently met with ADS leadership and developed several proposals regarding competition licensing, licensed officials, alignment of rules and anti-doping for presentation to the ADS Board of Directors. We are very disappointed that the ADS Board of Directors was unwilling to accept these proposals required to keep our environment safe and fair, despite USEF’s best efforts to be flexible regarding their Affiliate concerns. Ultimately, however, USEF cannot compromise on protecting our athletes, ensuring the welfare of our horses and maintaining the integrity of our sport.”

USEF continues to work with organizers and competitors to make certain athletes at every level have access to the competitive opportunities and resources needed to hone their talents. USEF is committed to the continued development of the sport of driving and will immediately begin a process to replace the ADS with a new Recognized Affiliate for driving.

Friday, June 14, 2019

Scientists unravel the mysteries of endurance horse metabolism

Horsetalk.co.nz - Full Article

June 13, 2019
Horsetalk.co.nz

Horses studied in a 160km endurance race made an effective metabolic switch from carbohydrate consumption to lipid consumption, but in doing so managed to maintain higher blood glucose levels than horses competing over shorter distances.

Lipid metabolism is known to take place during endurance exercise as a way of maintaining the energy supply as the glucose level falls. But, interestingly, researchers found that blood glucose levels did not fall as much in horses competing over the longer distances.

Scientists, in a paper published in the journal Frontiers in Molecular Biosciences, have taken what they describe as the first step toward unraveling the energy metabolism in endurance horses...

Read more here:
https://www.horsetalk.co.nz/2019/06/13/scientists-mysteries-endurance-horse-metabolism/