Monday, June 14, 2021

Tevis Fever - Ashley Wingert

GoPony.me - Full Article

JUNE 2, 2021 / ASHLEY WINGERT

It never goes away. It might ebb and wane for a time, but it’s always there, waiting.

51 days and counting until this year’s Tevis. This week, I’ve been working on finalizing details and travel arrangements for heading out there to crew again. Within a couple of months following the 2019 ride, Cathy put crew dibs on me for the following year…which, of course, got cancelled. So those crew dibs rolled forward into this year.

Earlier in the year, I was “meh” about it. Not sure I wanted to travel, unsure of how many restrictions would still be in place and have to be dealt with, how many hoops jumped through…just not sure it was worth it. But as plans have started to come together, and as life starts to once again slowly start resembling something a little closer to “normal”, without “new” attached to the front of it…I can feel myself getting excited again...

Read more here:
https://gopony.me/2021/06/02/tevis-fever/

Saturday, May 29, 2021

Why thru-riding horseback rider Gillian Larson believes women should go on more adventures

Today.com - Full Article and video

Gillian Larson became the first solo thru-rider of the Pacific Crest Trail in her 20s. Here's why she wants more women to "feel free in our environment."

May 27, 2021, 12:52 PM PDT / Source: TMRW
By Erica Chayes Wida

We are all works in progress; even the successful women you see owning it on Instagram faced stumbling blocks along the way and continue to work hard to stay at the top of their game. In this series, we're sitting down with the people that inspire us to find out: How'd they do it? And what is success really like? This is "Getting There."

Through the deserts, backcountry and treacherous mountain passes of the West Coast is a trail. It stretches 2,650 miles from the Mexican to the Canadian border. And in 2014, Gillian Larson became the youngest documented woman to ride it alone on horseback.

Thru-riding is the term for the people who mount their horses and see the country in its wildest places by riding long-distance trails. Some of the most famous in the U.S. include the Pacific Crest Trail, or PCT, and the Continental Divide Trail. Larson, a native Californian who's just 29, has ridden both in their entireties, amassing more than 10,000 miles. She first did the PCT at just 22 years old, becoming the youngest woman to do so, and again in 2016.

Some may recognize the trail from the Reese Witherspoon film, "Wild," based on the 2012 memoir by Cheryl Strayed, who thru-hiked 1,100 miles of it.

Larson is an equestrian with a masters in biology who was raised about 45 minutes outside of Los Angeles in Topanga Canyon, California. And while she's accomplished a groundbreaking feat and is being recognized for her achievements, which includes starring in a documentary short film by Firestone Walker, she remains humble and eager for her next quest...

Read more and see video here:
https://www.today.com/tmrw/why-thru-riding-horseback-rider-gillian-larson-believes-women-should-t219701

How to build a trustworthy trail horse

EquusMagazine.com - Full Article

Three seasoned trail riders offer strategies for overcoming the most common spoilers of the great-outdoor horseback experience.

EQUUS
UPDATED:MAR 10, 2017 ORIGINAL:MAY 20, 2008

Ah! A nice, relaxing trail ride on a pleasant summer day: What could be better to break the tedium of ring work and soothe the stresses of show training? Just head for the hills, the woods, the rolling meadows on horseback, alone or in congenial company, and all your troubles will melt away. Yeah, right... until your horse refuses to cross the creek or runs in terror from an innocent boulder or takes up a bone-jarring jig that puts you both in a lather for the duration of the ride.

When horses and their riders are unprepared for the out-of-arena experience, a simple walk through the woods turns into a series of frustrating or frightening confrontations. The disconnect between expectations and reality often begins with the choice of mount.

"Most people don't select horses for trail riding," says Montana horseman Dan Aadland, an avid backcountry rider and author of several books on the topic. "I get tired of hearing, 'Well, she's not good enough for the show ring, but she'll make a good trail horse.' Why should trail riding be relegated to a secondary job for a horse? If you want to trail ride exclusively, buy a horse who excels at it, not one who can't do anything else..."

Read more at:
Equus Magazine

Wednesday, May 26, 2021

Woman trekking across Nevada stops in Nye

PVTimes.com - Full Article

By Daria Sokolova Special to the Pahrump Valley Times
May 25, 2021 - 11:34 pm

After taking a year-long break due to the pandemic, Samantha Szesciorka is riding her horse across Nevada again to discover the state and promote wild horse adoption and public land preservation.

This year, Szesciorka is making her way from Las Vegas to Carson City with her horse Sage and her dog Juniper for the first time and making several stops in Nye County. She arrived in Las Vegas from Reno where she lives – a week before starting her ride on May 1.

“I like the challenge, but it’s just a fun personal project. I like getting to know Nevada on horseback, because it’s just a slow immersive way to see the state and see parts of it that many people don’t get to see,” Szesciorka said in a phone interview with the Pahrump Valley Times...

Read more here:
https://pvtimes.com/news/woman-trekking-across-nevada-stops-in-nye-99562/

Tuesday, May 18, 2021

The Performance of Endurance Horses

FEI.org - Full Article

18 May 2021
by Alison Lincoln

Alison Lincoln is a rider, author, coach and freelance groom with a degree in Equine Sports Coaching

Alison Lincoln looks at the importance of energy supply, training and recovery for long-distance horses... Competitive Endurance rides are a test of the athlete’s ability to safely manage their horse’s stamina and fitness while coping with the varying terrain, distance and weather conditions on the course.

At elite level, rides can be up to 160km (100miles) long and split into 3-6 loops. That’s exactly the distance we’ll see this weekend when the Longines FEI Endurance World Championship is held in Pisa, Italy.

At the start of Endurance competitions and at the end of each loop all horses must pass a veterinary examination before being allowed to continue. If a horse fails any of these ‘vet gates’ then their result is classified as FTQ (failure to qualify).

Research at international level events show that fast riding speeds in the early stages of a ride (loops 1 and 2) and when riding in large groups is a significant risk factor linked to negative outcomes for horses and tends to be followed by a sudden drop in speed in the following loop.

In both cases, it’s likely adrenalin takes over causing combinations to get ‘carried away’ and end up travelling at speeds they haven’t trained for or aren’t capable of maintaining for any length of time.

More often than not this leads to an FTQ classification due either to lameness or fatigue. Fatigue is more than just tiredness, it’s the muscles’ inability to continue to work and occurs primarily due to the depletion of energy stores or the build-up of lactic acid. (You know that burning feeling after you’ve stacked a barn full of hay? That’s lactic acid build-up)...

Read more here:
https://www.fei.org/stories/sport/endurance/performance-endurance-horses

Monday, May 17, 2021

Book Interview: a horseback adventure recalled, 30 years on

IrishExaminer.com - Full Article

Hilary Bradt speaks with Isabel Conway about 'A Connemara Journey'.

SAT, 15 MAY, 2021 - 13:00

- A Connemara Journey: A Thousand Miles on Horseback through Western Ireland has just been published by Bradt Guides. - See www.bradtguides.com and www.hilarybradt.com

Ask veteran explorer and travel guide writer Hilary Bradt why it took her over 30 years to publish “the most important adventure of my life, the one that changed me forever” and she has a great excuse. A string of guide books, tour-leading in remote parts of the world, plus running a successful business accounted for only part of the hold-up.

She had galloped through the rough manuscript, helped by detailed diaries and tape recordings, committing a rich tapestry of human encounters, sublime Irish landscapes, places of historic interest and the odd tall story heard during her epic 1,000-mile solo horseback journey through parts of Connaught and much of Munster back in 1984 to the page in a few weeks. Then Hilary lost her manuscript.

The co-founder of Bradt Guides – today with over 200 titles the world’s largest independently owned travel guides publisher – was fulfilling a childhood ambition to do a long-distance horseback ride which brought her to Ireland, giving free rein to her adventurous spirit and two Connemara ponies...

Read more here:
https://www.irishexaminer.com/lifestyle/artsandculture/arid-40289600.html

Sunday, May 16, 2021

Searching for the Big Five on a Horseback Safari

FEI.org - Full Story

16 May 2021
Words by Sophie Baker

Sophie Baker enjoys the wonders of South Africa with some delightful horses...

I’m seated on an expansive riverside deck overlooking the South African bushveld.

My riding helmet, atop the table, rocks back and forth ever so slightly as a gentle breeze does its best to pierce through the midday heat. As I wash down a bite of homemade orange cake with a sip of coffee, Gerti Kusseler starts the safety briefing.

First up; a form stating that if I don’t follow instructions carefully, I “might get eaten.” Not by her husband, Phillip Kusseler, head guide and the other half of the dynamic German duo. But by the lions and elephants we're going in search of – on horseback.

I’m at Wait A Little, South Africa’s only horseback safari that offers guests the opportunity to see the Big Five from horseback: lion, elephant, rhino, buffalo, and leopard.

They say that Africa gets under your skin, and into your blood. You see, once you’ve set foot on her soil - like it or not - Africa is in your veins...

Read more at:
https://www.fei.org/stories/lifestyle/my-equestrian-life/horseback-safari-south-africa-wait-little

Thursday, May 13, 2021

Horse & Rider Podcast Episode 39: The Ride - Gillian Larson

Horse & Rider Podcast - Listen

This episode of The Ride is brought to you by Soft-Ride Comfort Boots. Nichole and Michaela sit down with Gillian Larson (@thru_rider) to talk about her trail riding adventures. Gillian was the youngest woman to thru ride the Pacific Crest Trail on horseback–and she has done it twice. She was the first person to thru-ride both the Pacific Crest and the Continental Divide Trail—eventually accumulating more than 10,000 backcountry wilderness miles. Listen to this inspiring episode. Then check out Gillian's short film here!

Listen at:
Horseandrider.com/podcasts

For Good Endurance in Horses, Feed for the Right Gut Bacteria

Thehorse.com - Full Article

A French study is the first to connect the gut microbiota with the mitochondria in horses, or any other species.

Posted by Christa Lesté-Lasserre, MA | Apr 9, 2021

The feed horses eat can fuel their muscle power in more ways than you might think. According to a new study, muscle cells create energy based not only on available nutrients but also what the microorganisms in the gut—which vary according to what horses eat—tell them to do.

“There are some kinds of bacteria in the gut microbiota that favor the production of energy at a (cellular) level and which, consequently, could enhance performance,” said Eric Barrey, PhD, DVM, the Integrative Biology and Equine Genetics team leader at the National Research Institute for Agriculture, Food, and Environment (INRA), in Jouy-en-Josas, France...

Read more here:
Thehorse.com

Thursday, May 06, 2021

Equestrian Adventuresses Horse Podcast Ep 127: Living & Riding in Mongolia

EquestrianAdventuresses.com - Listen

by utetonia
April 28, 2021

On today’s episode Ute talks with Julie Veloo, Equestrian Adventuress from Canada who made Mongolia her home more than ten years ago. Together with her husband, Julie runs the Veloo Foundation, operating two kindergartens for underprivileged children in Ulan Bator. Julie learned to ride at the age of fifty only after she came to Mongolia in what she calls an 35 00 Acres-Open-Arena on Mongolia horses. Today she has ridden more than 37 000 km all across Mongolia. She organises the annual Gobi Gallop endurance ride as a charity event for her foundation and she is planning the longest charity horse trek in history criss-crossing Mongolia in 2022.

Having lived in Mongolia for so many years, Julie shares her insights into Mongolian society and culture with us and talks about its people and horses which will make you want to pack your bags and book the next flight to Mongolia!

Listen:
https://equestrianadventuresses.com/2021/04/28/horse-podcast-ep-127-living-riding-in-mongolia/

Tuesday, April 27, 2021

Equestrian Adventuresses Podcast Ep 82: The Gaucho Derby and other Extreme Horse Riding Adventures

EquestrianAdventuresses.com - Listen

utetonia
January 11, 2021

On today’s episode, Ute talks with Stevie Delahunt, an Equestrian Adventuress from the USA. Stevie has participated in the Mongol Derby, the Gaucho Derby, the Tevis Cup, the Wildcoast Race in South Africa and plenty other extreme horse trails and races around the world. She uses this experience to teach other riders in boot camps, the skills they need to participate in endurance races and extreme horse adventures. She also works for The Adventurists, the company organising The Mongol Derby and the Gaucho Derby among others. She conducts the interview with the applicants and decides together with a team who will participate and who will be rejected. She tells us about another derby which is yet secret and which will come to happen in the future and what is important for her in her interviews. So, if you ever plan to join the Mongol or Gaucho Derby, be sure not to miss this episode!

Listen:
https://equestrianadventuresses.com/2021/01/11/horse-podcast-ep-82-the-gaucho-derby-and-other-extreme-horse-riding-adventures/

Monday, April 26, 2021

How a Cossack covered 5,500 miles on horseback in 1889

RBTH.com - Full Article

APR 19 2021
NIKOLAY SHEVCHENKO

He nearly froze to death, but managed to cross the finish line and impress the people and the Tsar. Cossack Dmitri Peshkov traveled from Blagoveshchensk in Russia’s Far East to St. Petersburg, then the capital of the Russian Empire, covering 8,800 kilometers (5,500 miles) on a small, but sturdy horse. By the end of the trip, he had earned the status of a countrywide celebrity and even met with the Russian Emperor.

The Mongolian breed

Peshkov, a military officer in the rank of Sotnik, came up with the idea of a grand expedition, inspired by a previous achievement of a different traveler and military officer named Mikhail Aseev, who, in 1889, rode a horse from the city of Lubny in the Poltava province of the Russian Empire, to Paris, France, covering about 2,500 kilometers.

Peshkov envisioned a much more daring enterprise, however. He planned to travel from Blagoveshchensk, a city on the eastern fronts of the Russian Empire, to St. Petersburg, covering about 8,800 kilometers in a saddle.

Read more here:
https://www.rbth.com/history/333687-cossack-dmitri-peshkov-travel-horseback

Wednesday, April 21, 2021

Equestrian Adventuresses Podcast Ep 118: How Far Can a Horse Travel in One Day

EquestrianAdventuresses.com - Listen

by utetonia
April 7, 2021

In today’s episode, Heather and Ute are talking about how far you can travel on horseback in a day. Naturally, there are some huge differences between an endurance rider with his Arabian horse and the average weekend rider with his Irish Cob, therefore it is extremely difficult to generalize. But we are giving you some examples of what can be done and talk about limitations and considerations. There are of course a lot of factors influencing the speed and distance you can travel on a day or multi-day ride and we will discuss many of them such as weather, terrain, access to water and feed, and so on. But we also give you some tips on how to get your horse fit for the challenge and what you can do so that your next long ride will become a success.

So if you are planning a day or a multiple-day ride in the future, here are some great tips!

Listen:
https://equestrianadventuresses.com/2021/04/07/horse-podcast-ep-118-how-far-can-a-horse-travel-in-one-day/

Do You ‘Baby Talk’ to Your Horse? She Hears You

Thehorse.com - Full Article

A new study provides evidence that human speech style can affect equine behavior and that pet-directed speech (aka “baby talk”) improves human-horse communication.

Posted by Robin Foster, PhD, CHBC, Cert. AAB, IAABC | Apr 4, 2021

Do you talk to your horse? If so, your speaking style matters, according to new research by Lea Lansade, PhD, and colleagues from Université de Tours in France. The article, “Horses are sensitive to baby talk: pet‐directed speech facilitates communication with humans in a pointing task and during grooming,” was published in the March 2021 issue of Animal Cognition.

This is the first study to provide evidence that human speech style can affect equine behavior. Lansade was particularly interested in the use of pet-directed speech (PDS) with horses. PDS has the same sound qualities as baby talk (also called infant-directed speech [IDS], Motherese, and Parentese). This style of speaking has a distinctive vocal signature, with a high pitch and slow rate.

PDS captures a horse’s attention and improves human-horse communication The research began with a social media survey. Most horse owners who responded to the survey claimed to talk to their horse using PDS, but fewer than half thought the horse was actually sensitive to it. The researchers then conducted two experiments with 20 Welsh mares comparing the effects of PDS and adult-directed speech (ADS). They found that:...

Read more here:
Thehorse.com

Monday, April 12, 2021

Gut Bacteria “Talk” to Horse’s Cells to Extend Energy Output, Improve Their Athletic Performance

SciTechDaily.com - Full Article

By FRONTIERS
APRIL 7, 2021

Study linking gut bacteria to more efficient energy generation in the cells of horses paves the way for dietary supplements that enhance their performance.

A horse’s gut microbiome communicates with its host by sending chemical signals to its cells, which has the effect of helping the horse to extend its energy output, finds a new study published in Frontiers in Molecular Biosciences. This exciting discovery paves the way for dietary supplements that could enhance equine athletic performance.

“We are one of the first to demonstrate that certain types of equine gut bacteria produce chemical signals that communicate with the mitochondria in the horse’s cells that regulate and generate energy,” says Eric Barrey, author of this study and the Integrative Biology and Equine Genetics team leader at the National Research Institute for Agriculture, Food and Environment, France. “We believe that metabolites — small molecules created by breaking down bigger molecules for food or growth — produced by these bacteria have the effect of delaying low blood sugar and inflammation in the cells, which in turn extends the horse’s athletic performance...”

Read more here: https://scitechdaily.com/gut-bacteria-talk-to-horses-cells-to-extend-energy-output-improve-their-athletic-performance/

Thursday, April 08, 2021

Long Riding with Nevada Discovery Ride

RideClimb.com Podcast - Listen

April 7, 2021
by Jess

Have you ever wished a trail ride wouldn’t end? Then, you may want to consider long riding; which is simply long distance travel on horseback. It’s not competitive, it’s not timed, and there are no limits. It’s just an adventure.

My guest today is long rider, Samantha Szesciorka. She has completed two journeys across Nevada and she’s about to embark on her third. On her first long ride in 2013, Sam rode 500 miles across Nevada from Baker in the east to Reno in the west...

Read more and listen:
https://rideclimb.com/podcast/long-riding-with-nevada-discovery-ride/

Wild at Heart: Trekking Across Australia with the Brumbies

(Cat Vinton photo)
Horse-Canada.com - Full Article

Armed only with her wits and a GPS connected to a support team, French author Aliénor le Gouvello tackled the infamous 5,330 km trail.

By: Kim Izzo | April 7, 2021

When French expat Aliénor le Gouvello encountered semi-wild Brumbies in the Australian outback, she was immediately obsessed. An animal fiercely loved by some and considered a scourge by others, Brumbies have a complicated place in Australian culture and history. Inspired to celebrate their character, le Gouvello tamed three brumbies ‒ Roxanne, River and Cooper ‒ and teamed up with them to take on the physical and mental challenges of the Bicentennial National Trail, Australia’s longest trek, which passes through 18 of Australia’s national parks and more than 50 state forests...

Read more here:
https://horse-canada.com/magazine/profiles/wild-heart-trekking-across-australia-with-brumbies/

Wednesday, April 07, 2021

Life After Racing giving retired racehorses a new career in UAE

Khaleejtimes.com - Full Article

Tamanna Sajeed/Dubai
Filed on April 6, 2021

The league aims to encourage ex-racehorses and their riders to compete in new disciplines, and runs till April 30, 2021

The UAE’s world-class racing scene has been bringing joy to equestrians for decades. Now a UAE-based non-profit organisation aims to do the same for the racehorses that once illuminated the iconic Meydan racecourse.

Life After Racing was launched on February 15, 2021, by Dubai-based expats Debbie Armaly and her co-founders Sophie Dyball and Karen Stewart. The league aims to encourage ex-racehorses and their riders to compete in new disciplines, and runs till April 30, 2021.

“They can go on to compete in new disciplines… show jumping, dressage, cross-country, or just a general happy hacker - they don’t have to compete in their new lives,” says Armaly, a syndicate member of the Emirates Entertainment Racing Club who has been rehoming ex-racehorses from the UAE for over a decade.

She has rehomed horses such as Prince Shaun, Los Barbados, My Catch and Shamaal Nibras who have all ran on the World Cup night in previous years...

Read more here:
https://www.khaleejtimes.com/sport/horse-racing/life-after-racing-giving-retired-racehorses-a-new-career-in-uae

Monday, April 05, 2021

Your Horse Needs Forage Even at Night

TheHorse.com - Full Article

More than four hours without feed is fasting for a horse and can lead to issues. The solution for evening feeding? Slow feeders extended nighttime “grazing” time by 95-105%, researchers observed.

Posted by Christa Lesté-Lasserre, MA | Sep 9, 2019

Night falls, and it’s time for bed. Your horse has had his last hay meal of the day and is comfortably in his freshly cleaned stall for a good night’s sleep. All’s well, right?

Actually, if you’ve fed loose hay, you might be the only one enjoying a comfortable evening. According to Irish and Scottish researchers, horses can consume loose haylage quickly and end up waiting so many hours before their morning meal that it could affect their health.

“Recent recommendations highlight that when horses go more than four hours without food, they’re technically fasting,” said Barbara Hardman, a postgraduate MSc from the University of Edinburgh’s Royal (Dick) School of Veterinary Studies, in Scotland. “Foraging (the behavior of consuming forage) is a ‘highly motivated’ behavior for horses, meaning that it’s critical that they perform it for not only their gut health but their mental health, as well...”

Read more here:
https://thehorse.com/178397/your-horse-needs-forage-even-at-night/?utm_medium=Reader+Favorites+enews&utm_source=Newsletter

Friday, April 02, 2021

Barn Owls and Horses: Nature’s Mousetrap

Thehorse.com - Full Article

A barn owl family will consume nearly 2,000 mice or other rodents in just a couple of months. The good news for you is all it requires is the installation of a simple nest box—and the right habitat for their prey.

Posted by Alayne Blickle | Mar 13, 2021

The mouse situation in your horse barn is getting out of control. You know mice can carry diseases, some serious to humans. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, mice and rats can directly or indirectly transmit 20 diseases worldwide. Several of these, such as leptospirosis and salmonellosis, affect horses, as well. And what about the moles and gophers in your pasture making a mess of things with their telltale little piles of dirt and “ankle-breaking” holes?

Rodents are probably one of the toughest issues to deal with on horse properties. They’re small, stealthy, and primarily active after dark when we can’t see them. So how do you reduce the populations of these persistent little things without lethal trapping or using chemicals that are deadly to other animals in the ecosystem, including dogs and cats?...

Read more here:
https://thehorse.com/198007/barn-owls-and-horses-natures-mousetrap/?utm_medium=Farm%20barn%20enews&utm_source=Newsletter

Thursday, April 01, 2021

Proud Flesh and How to Prevent it

USRider.org - Full Article

By Horse & Rider | 2/1/2016

What Proud Flesh Is:

As your horse's wound begins to heal, pinkish granulation tissue fills in the gaps between soft tissues. Granulation tissue normally stops forming as the skin edges grow together to close the wound. But when healing doesn't go according to plan, the granulation tissue becomes exuberant-it keeps growing until it bulges above skin level, so newly formed skin can't grow over the wound. That's proud flesh.

When Proud Flesh happens:

Proud flesh tends to form in wounds below your horse's knees and hocks, where there's little soft tissue between skin and bone, and where movement constantly tugs the wound's edges. It's most likely to occur in places with lots of movement, such as over joints, or when a complication, such as infection, slows healing.

How to prevent Proud Flesh:...

Read more here:
https://www.usrider.org/article/proud-flesh-prevent-31258-41?utm_campaign=USR%20-%20IP%20-%20Health%20Tip&utm_medium=email&_hsmi=115542369&_hsenc=p2ANqtz-8bS__le5ohZsC5NkoVJyMAmblUa3dIKY2vHOMaKchJAI96WHC30rTq9AtqfoJ_zddkzvrhuxQqYAtBomberrXhB8LCZw&utm_content=115542369&utm_source=hs_email

Tuesday, March 30, 2021

Mule who led hikers to injured owner found after disappearing in Estacada park

OregonLive.com - Full Story

Updated Mar 30, 9:15 AM; Posted Mar 29, 8:00 AM

By Jayati Ramakrishnan | The Oregonian/OregonLive

UPDATE #1 (3/29): Oregon Parks and Recreation Department spokesperson Chris Havel said the mule was found around 7:30 a.m. Monday.

UPDATE #2 (3/29): Hickory the mule is back home after leading hikers to injured owner, then disappearing into forest

----

On Sunday, a mule led a pair of hikers through a Clackamas County state park to the spot where its injured owner had fallen earlier in the afternoon.

Then it disappeared into the forest.

The Clackamas County Sheriff’s Office said a 60-year-old man, whom they have not publicly identified, was riding his mule on trails at Milo McIver State Park, when they believe he fell off and hurt himself.

The mule began walking alone on the trail until it found two people hiking, said Sgt. Marcus Mendoza, then led them back to the injured man.

One of the hikers who found the mule, Doug Calvert, said he and his wife were on foot on a popular equestrian trail around noon when they saw what they thought was a horse walking toward them.

As they got closer, they realized the animal was a mule, and it was alone and watching them.

“It kept stopping and looking back to make sure we were following it,” Calvert said...

Read more here:
https://www.oregonlive.com/clackamascounty

Monday, March 29, 2021

Building a Better Helmet: MIPS and Why it Matters

HorseSport.com - Full Article

Why this design technology is so important and how research is working to make us safer ‒ plus we bust a few helmet myths along the way.

By: Alison King | March 26, 2021

If you’ve purchased a new helmet in the past couple of years, chances are you’re already aware of MIPS technology. If not, read on and we’ll explain what MIPS is and why it’s so important ‒ while busting a few helmet myths along the way. What is MIPS?

MIPS stands for Multi-Directional Impact Protection System, and that’s exactly what it is – a design technology that allows helmets to provide more protection to the wearer in the case of an impact or fall. While MIPS has been widely used in sports such as cycling, downhill skiing, and snowboarding for years, it’s a relatively new addition to equestrian helmets. How does it work?

During an angled impact, rotational motion causes damage to the brain, often resulting in a concussion or more serious TBI (traumatic brain injury). The MIPS magic lies in a thin layer of foam added to the inside of a helmet. This low-friction layer, as it’s called, is designed to move inside the helmet shell to provide a shearing effect. The liner – and the wearer’s head – can slide 10 to 15mm relative to the helmet shell in all directions, dissipating the energy from a fall or an impact away from the brain.

Traditional helmets are designed to protect the skull in the case of a linear impact – a fall straight down onto the head. The hard helmet shell is tested for its ability to withstand an impact and prevent a rock or other hard object from penetrating that shell and reaching the skull. However, they are not designed to prevent the forces generated by a fall or impact from being absorbed by the brain, nor are they tested for performance when the impact is on an angle – a much more realistic simulation of a fall from a horse...

Read more here:
https://horsesport.com/magazine/rider-health/building-better-helmet-mips-why-matters/

Tuesday, March 23, 2021

Equestrian Adventuresses Horse Podcast Ep 111: Long Distance Riding Passion – Crossing Europe on Horseback

EquestrianAdventuresses.com - Listen

by utetonia
March 19, 2021

In today’s episode, Ute talks with Cathleen Leonard, Equestrian Adventuress and long distance rider from England. Cathleen has traveled across Great Britain and Ireland with her two rescue draft horses, her Warmblood cross and her dog. She tells us all about her difficult beginnings, how she nearly gave up on long distance riding and how she finally succeeded in realizing her dream of doing an epic ride from Scotland to Cornwall. Today Cathleen is an experienced long-distance rider and has written and published two books about her journeys.

However, her biggest adventure is yet to come: Crossing Europe from West to East on Horseback, riding from Portugal to Romania with horses horses, her dog, her partner and a little, one-eyed mule. Currently marooned in Portugal due to the Corona lockdown, she is not deterred and has done a ride cross Portugal in autumn and winter and now hopes to set out towards Romania this spring.

Listen:
https://equestrianadventuresses.com/2021/03/19/horse-podcast-ep-111-long-distance-riding-passion-crossing-europe-on-horseback/

Sunday, March 21, 2021

2021 AERC Convention Notes: Nick Warhol on What Makes a Great Endurance Horse, and How Do You Get One?

TheSweatyEquestrian.com - Full Article

3/17/2021
by Tamara Baysinger

You know Nick Warhol, right? Over 13,000 miles in 13 years of endurance, 30-plus 100-milers, ride manager, former AERC board member, and storyteller. Yeah, you know the guy. His talk at the 2021 AERC Convention was worth the price of admission. (You can still access all the Convention sessions through the end of March!)

Warhol began with a disclaimer: All opinions are his and could be argued by others.

I reckon that’s true of anyone trying to sort out what makes a great endurance horse. We all agree on good feet, correct conformation, and all that…but Warhol’s focus went more than bone deep: His #1 most important trait for an endurance horse: its mind.

Warhol listed a variety of mental attributes of a good endurance horse, noting that some are trainable, and others are not. Here’s his list:...

Read more here:
https://www.thesweatyequestrian.com/sweatyequestrianblog/2021-aerc-convention-notes-nick-warhol-on-what-makes-a-great-endurance-horse-and-how-do-you-get-one