Saturday, January 19, 2019

What your horse's hair whirls and whorls may mean

Equusmagazine.com - Full Article

Research shows that the direction of a horse's "cowlicks" provides clues to how he will behave when he spooks.
MICK MCCLUSKEY, BVSC, MACVSCJAN 11, 2019

New research suggests there’s a surprisingly simple way of predicting whether a spooking horse will turn to the right or left: Check out his facial whorls.

The equivalent of “cowlicks” in people, whorls are swirling patterns of hair; they are commonly seen on the forehead but can appear anywhere on a horse’s coat. The location and direction of whorls in humans are linked to early fetal brain development. In fact, abnormal whorls are common in children with developmental disorders...

Read more here:
https://equusmagazine.com/horse-world/whirls-hair-whorls-54193

Wednesday, January 16, 2019

Shoeing the Low-Heeled Horse

Thehorse.com - Full Article

Some effects of the shoeing strategies farriers use to correct low heels in horses can actually be detrimental in the long run. Here’s how one farrier recommends correcting this frustrating lameness cause.

Posted by Alexandra Beckstett, The Horse Managing Editor | Oct 31, 2018

Low heels, also called underrun or collapsed heels, can be a frustrating cause of lameness in horses. Further, the effects of the shoeing strategies used to correct them can actually be detrimental in the long run.

So Simon Curtis, FWCF, BSc(Hons), PhD, HonAssocRCVS, an award-winning farrier based in Newmarket, Suffolk, U.K., proposed a long-term solution to the issue at the 2018 British Equine Veterinary Association Congress, held Sept. 12-15 in Birmingham, U.K.

While the terms low and underrun are often used interchangeably when describing horses’ hooves, they do differ.

“A low-heeled horse is one where the digit has a low angle but aligned hoof-pastern axis (HPA, how the front hoof wall aligns with the pastern) and the caudal (rear) hoof wall is not bent,” Curtis explained. “Underrun heels are associated with a negative HPA (when the pastern angle is steeper than the hoof wall) and are long and folded under the solar hoof capsule...”

Read more here:
https://thehorse.com/162245/shoeing-the-low-heeled-horse/

Tuesday, January 15, 2019

How Much Hay To Feed Horses: Where To Begin

KER.com - Full Article

September 13, 2018
By Kentucky Equine Research Staff

Horses thrive on diets rife with forages, whether it is a medley of pasture grasses, baled hay, or another forage product, such as hay cubes, hay pellets, or haylage. They are capable of processing huge quantities of forage to meet their nutritional demands, but where does a horse owner start in determining how much forage to feed?

An estimate can be made based on the horse’s age, body weight, and physiologic state. Here’s a quick reference table to illustrate expected forage consumption by horses...

Read more here:
https://ker.com/equinews/much-hay-feed-horses-begin/?utm_source=KER+Newsletter&utm_campaign=1686f16575-Focus_Jan19_Forage&utm_medium=email&utm_term=0_0d95781dfc-1686f16575-11166&mc_cid=1686f16575&mc_eid=6283eb0e4a

Monday, January 14, 2019

Female Ranchers Are Reclaiming the American West

NYTimes.com - Full Article

As men leave animal agriculture for less gritty work, more ranches are being led by women — with new ideas about technology, ecology and the land.


Photographs by Amanda Lucier
Written by Amy Chozick

Jan. 11, 2019

Hundreds of years before John Wayne and Gary Cooper gave us a Hollywood version of the American West, with men as the brute, weather-beaten stewards of the land, female ranchers roamed the frontier. They were the indigenous, Navajo, Cheyenne and other tribes, and Spanish-Mexican rancheras, who tended and tamed vast fields, traversed rugged landscapes with their dogs, hunted, and raised livestock.

The descendants of European settlers brought with them ideas about the roles of men and women, and for decades, family farms and ranches were handed down to men. Now, as mechanization and technology transform the ranching industry, making the job of cowboy less about physical strength — though female ranchers have that in spades — and more about business, animal husbandry and the environment, women have reclaimed their connection to the land...

Read more here:
https://www.nytimes.com/2019/01/11/business/women-ranchers-american-west-photo-essay.html

Sunday, January 13, 2019

Must Have Items for Trail Rides

Traiilmeister.com - Full Article

by Robert Eversole

What Do You Rely on When the Day Goes Downhill?

As published by Western Mule Magazine Nov, 2104

My failure to look at a calendar recently resulted in the good fortune of meeting a fellow Western Mule reader, Mr. John H. of the Spokane, Washington area. John is the President of the North Idaho Saddle Mule Club, an all around good guy and a real backcountry resource who teaches the art of survival to military personnel. He’s the real deal.

I had pulled into the location where my Backcountry Horsemen Chapter holds its monthly meetings. That I didn’t recognize many of the faces that were milling about didn’t phase me since I’m not a regular at our gatherings; after all I’d rather be riding. Well I must have looked out of place and John greeted me with “Are you here for the Mule Club?” Well, Mrs. Eversole raised me to always look for the positive and the Mule Club was having a potluck so I stayed!

A few days later John and I ran into each other again and like riders around the world we started talking about some of our various trips. The conversation soon veered towards tales of trail accidents, what riders can do to prepare for these “just in case” situations, and the sad fact that most riders don’t prepare at all.

Even an easy front country “just a day ride” can very quickly turn into a nightmare should the unthinkable happen. If you’re injured and come off your mount how you’ve prepared for the unexpected can well make the difference between an inconvenience and far worse.

The core of these preparations is often referred to as the Ten Essentials that you should never leave the trailhead without. That means never. Ever. The couple of pounds that these essentials represent are not “extra” they are critical. I see many riders who have heard of this concept but still fail to head the advice. Why not? I think a lot of it is the “it won’t happen to me” syndrome. Well, maybe it won’t but are you willing to bet your life on fair skies and no accidents? I’m not...

Read more here:
https://www.trailmeister.com/must-have-items-for-day-rides-western-mule-nov-2014/

Friday, January 11, 2019

4 easy ways to ice-proof your horse's hooves

Equus.com - Full Article

The rock-hard accumulations of ice and snow that can get packed into a horse’s feet can cause lameness and injury. Here’s how to keep hoof ice balls from forming.


MELINDA FRECKLETON, DVM, WITH CHRISTINE BARAKAT
JAN 4, 2019

One winter hazard that riders in northern climes know well is ice balls. When snow and ice get packed under a horse’s hoof, it warms up slightly against the sole, then freezes readily against the cold metal of the shoe. The ice can quickly build up until the horse is walking on a hard, solid mass of frozen material, called “ice balls” or “snowballs.” The wetter and more dense the snow, the more likely it is that snowballs will occur. “Slushier” ice will fall away from the foot more readily, and light, dry snow won’t pack well, but wet or icy snow can easily get compacted into a tight, hard block.

Walking on the uneven mass even for a short time can cause a number of problems from tripping and sliding to strains or sprains of the muscles, tendons and joints. Persistent snowballs can lead to bruises and hoof cracks. Horses do OK much of the
time when there is snow all around, but once on a firm surface, many will teeter as if they are on high-heeled shoes.

Removing large masses of ice from under your horse’s feet can be difficult, and by the time you discover them, the damage may already be underway. It’s better to take measures to prevent them from forming:...

Read more here:
https://equusmagazine.com/management/prevent-ice-balls?utm_source=EQUUSNL&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=Newsletter&_hsenc=p2ANqtz-9pT6YWtxDhpUGB2ziKvTD7hYNECD3B0GI8pH2jC7AtSpdiWDaYdl9l696nJXPQV84xwt3gg88zafS1DphapwBlBJzhQA&_hsmi=68843624

Arizona’s wild horse paradox

HCN.org - Full Article

Debbie Weingarten
Dec. 13, 2018

Activists and agencies try to balance the West’s horse mythology against herd impacts.

The horses stood chest-deep in the river, pulling up long strands of eelgrass with their teeth. There must have been 20 of them, in colors ranging from nearly white to ruddy brown. The babies stood wobbly in the current. My partner and I floated quietly past in our kayak, trying not to spook them. But it was a sweltering Friday in July, and we were followed by hollering college students in rented innertubes. Beer coolers floated along behind them, and music reverberated off the canyon walls. Uninterested and used to the party, the horses barely looked up.

A stone’s throw from metropolitan Phoenix, the Salt River runs through the Tonto National Forest, where deer, bighorn sheep and bald eagles live amid cactus and mesquite bosques. But the most famous and controversial inhabitants are the area’s “wild” horses. Once slated for removal by the U.S. Forest Service for reasons of public safety, today these horses are protected by state law. Now, in the first arrangement of its kind, a state government is working with a nonprofit to manage horses on federal land. Now long-feuding entities must work together to find a way to balance the horses — and the mythology of the American West they represent — with river and land conservation and public safety...

Read more here:
https://www.hcn.org/articles/wild-horses-arizonas-wild-horse-paradox?utm_source=wcn1&utm_medium=email

Tuesday, January 08, 2019

Winter-Driving Tips

USRider.org - Full Article

This winter, follow these 12 expert winter-driving tips to help keep you and your horse safe


By EquiSearch | 12/14/2018

Winter is coming. For some of us, winter is already here! USRider Equestrian Motor Plan reminds everyone who travels with horses to be careful, and to perform routine preventative trailer maintenance to enhance overall travel safety.

Maintain your vehicle according to the manufacturer’s service schedule, and take your vehicle to a trusted mechanic. This is especially crucial for heavy-duty vehicles towing precious cargo. Be proactive rather than reactive.

“Yes, it’s cold outside, but you still need to take the time to perform safety checks on your tow vehicle and trailer before traveling,” says Bill Riss, general manager of USRider.

Establish a relationship with a trusted mechanic who’s certified with the National Institute of Automotive Service Excellence (ASE). Do this before your vehicle breaks down on the side of the highway while towing your trailer, especially in bad weather.

1. Invest in snow tires. During winter months, traction tires are recommended. Such tires must have at least one-eighth-inch of tread, and be labeled "Mud and Snow," "M+S," or "All-Season," or have a mountain/snowflake symbol. See your tire dealer to find out which tires are best for your vehicle...

Read more here:
http://www.usrider.org/article/winterdriving-tips-111?utm_source=TravelTip&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=December2018&_hsenc=p2ANqtz-_R6sFcmhiWHgsBzcAtRo_tUlN5mIqA1Lg9xKJdqJ2F1eBC-y20PufFPPukW-2Q1gsN7_B7beFd3Cvh36o2_iFdjRc7Dg&_hsmi=68431140

Saturday, January 05, 2019

Equus “Story of the Horse” Premieres on PBS

PBS.org

Premiere date: January 16, 2019 | 0:00:30
Premieres Wednesdays, January 16-23, 8 pm EST (check local listings)

The relationship between man and his noble steed is almost as old as civilization itself. Ever since the mysterious beginning of our extraordinary partnership, horses helped shape the human world. At the speed of a horse, our ancestors conquered distances and built empires. Together, humans and horses flourished side by side. What makes us so perfect for each other?

Join anthropologist Dr. Niobe Thompson and equine experts on a two-part adventure around the world and throughout time to discover the origins of the horse. In a stunning 3D reconstruction, see the earliest member of the horse family rise from a fossil bed and begin a transformation into the magnificent animal we know today. Discover why horses have 360-degree vision and gallop on a single toe. Explore the science of speed with renowned racehorse trainers. Uncover the emotional intelligence of horses and their deep connection with humans. Encounter extraordinary horse breeds from Saudi Arabia to Kentucky to Siberia, and meet the horses of Sable Island that are truly returning to the wild ways of their ancestors. Filmed over 18 months across 3 continents, featuring drone and helicopter-mounted RED aerials, extensive Phantom slow-motion footage, and a live-recorded symphonic score.

Friday, January 04, 2019

Trail-Sharing Tips Horseback Riders Can Use

Thehorse.com - Full Article

Remember these three keys to riding your horse on multiuse trails safely.

Posted by Kim McCarrel | Jan 3, 2019

You’re enjoying a beautiful sunny day on the trail with your horse. The trail is designated multiuse, so as you ride you’re likely to meet hikers, mountain bikers, and maybe even motorcycle or ATV users. Your enjoyment and safety depend on how well everyone shares the trail.

You can’t control the actions of other trail users, of course. But your actions and demeanor can make the difference between a safe, friendly interaction and a nasty confrontation. And it’s easy to remember how to safely share the trail: Just stop, speak, and smile...

Read more at:
https://thehorse.com/164656/trail-sharing-tips-horseback-riders-can-use/

Tuesday, January 01, 2019

Can Diet Prevent Scratches in Horses?

Thehorse.com - Full Article

My horse is turned out to pasture for at least part of each day. Every winter he gets scratches. Is there anything I can do nutritionally that might help prevent them?

Posted by Clair Thunes, PhD | Dec 24, 2018

Q.My horse is turned out to pasture for at least part of each day. Every winter he gets scratches. Is there anything I can do nutritionally that might help prevent them?

A.Most of the time scratches aren’t too big of an issue. However, they can indeed become a big problem literally overnight. I personally had a mare who went from having a couple of tiny spots of scratches one evening to being nonweight-bearing lame and having full-on cellulitis in the leg the next morning. My advice is twofold: don’t ignore scratches if present, and prevention is ideal.

What is Scratches?
Scratches—sometimes referred to as grease heel, mud fever, or equine pastern dermatitis—is a skin infection on the back of the pastern and heel; sometimes scabs can extend as far as the fetlock area...

Read more here:
https://thehorse.com/164533/can-diet-prevent-scratches-in-horses/

Monday, December 31, 2018

Gastric Ulcers in Horses: 30 Years of Research

Thehorse.com - Full Article

In the past 30 years, researchers have made great strides in understanding gastric ulcers. Those findings and ones yet to be made can help improve horse health and welfare now and into the future.

Posted by Erica Larson, News Editor | Nov 30, 2018

Today, we know horses are prone to developing gastric (or stomach) ulcers. We know an estimated 50-90% of horses suffer from gastric ulcers and that performance and racehorses are some of the most susceptible. We even know what treatment and management options can help ulcers heal and reduce their changes of returning.

But concern about gastric ulcers weren’t always common. In fact, not long ago, relatively speaking, veterinarians published some of the first research on these stomach lesions. Al Merritt, DVM, Dipl. ACVIM, a professor emeritus at the University of Florida College of Veterinary Medicine, in Gainesville, described what researchers have learned about equine gastric ulcers in the past three decades at the 2018 Kentucky Equine Research Conference, held Oct. 29-30 in Lexington, Kentucky...

Read more here:
https://thehorse.com/163371/gastric-ulcers-in-horses-30-years-of-research/

6 Tips for Riding in Wild Horse Country

SagebrushRider.com - Full Article

July 1 2018
Story and Photos by Samantha Szesciorka

Whenever I give talks in other states about long distance horseback travel in Nevada, someone always asks about dangerous encounters with wildlife. Were you ever attacked by bears or wolves?, they ask with a look on their face that’s a mixture of hope and horror. I enjoy watching their expression become quizzical once I respond. In my opinion, the most likely, and potentially dangerous, wild animal encounter you can have riding in Nevada… is wild horses.

In the course of riding thousands of miles around this wonderful state, my horse and I have had run-ins with countless wild horses. They are not always pleasant encounters. I don’t think anyone has been charged by wild horses more than us! We’ve dealt with wild horses on the trail, in camp, and even in the middle of the night.

Nevada is home to more wild horses than any other state – more than 40,000 according to the Bureau of Land Management’s last count in March of this year – so chances are good that you’ll run into some if you’re out riding on public land. Wild horses are territorial and they can be aggressive, so it’s important to be prepared to keep yourself and your horse safe. Here are six tips for riding among wild horses:...

Read more here:
https://sagebrushrider.com/good-horsekeeping/6-tips-for-riding-in-wild-horse-country/

Saturday, December 22, 2018

Legendary Kabardian Horses Galloping To Comeback

Rferl.org - Full Article

DECEMBER 22, 2018 11:25 GMT
By Pete Baumgartner

The Kabardian horse's strength and endurance were legendary as it carried Circassian warriors battling Imperial Russian forces in the high mountains of the Caucasus in the 1800s.

But the animal was in a dire situation as the U.S.S.R. collapsed in 1991, nearly vanishing into obscurity.

Now, breeders and animal registries suggest the Kabardian has been resurrected in its home region and is even flourishing in stables farther West. "At the fall of the Soviet Union, the breed was close to extinction," Pawel Krawczyk, who has bred, trained, and raced Kabardian horses, tells RFE/RL.

Hundreds of animals from a dwindling population were being transported at the time to countries like Italy for meat, he says, "essentially to make sausage" -- as the Soviet and then Russian breeding programs broke down amid the chaos.

Russian stud farms were soon left with "thousands of horses, no money to feed them, and expenses such as the salaries of the workers," he says.

"It was a very difficult situation..."

Read more here:
https://www.rferl.org/a/legendary-kabardian-horses-galloping-to-comeback/29670854.html

Wednesday, December 19, 2018

Endurance Riding: Start Slow to Finish Strong

TheHorse.com - Full Article

Riding at fast speeds at the start of endurance rides often leads to elimination during veterinary checks, researchers have learned. And while that might seem like common sense, many riders continue to ride too fast in rides’ early stages, one scientists said.

Posted by Christa Lesté-Lasserre, MA | Dec 18, 2018

The age-old adage says “slow and steady wins the race,” and researchers have found that it rings true for endurance riding—at least at the beginning of the ride.

While that might seem obvious or “common sense,” the fact is many riders continue to ride fast in the early stages of endurance events, said Euan David Bennet, PhD, a research associate at the University of Glasgow School of Veterinary Medicine’s Weipers Centre for Equine Welfare, in Scotland. And as his new study shows, a too-quick start frequently leads to failure to qualify (FTQ) to continue the ride during veterinary checks.

“This should certainly help develop a speed strategy to help avoid FTQ outcomes,” Bennet said. “That’s not quite the same as developing a strategy for a win, but for riders that want to win, safely finishing the ride would be a good start...”

Read more here:
https://thehorse.com/164299/endurance-riding-start-slow-to-finish-strong/

Monday, December 17, 2018

Risk Factors for Endurance Riding Eliminations

Thehorse.com - Full Article

Knowing elimination risk factors can help veterinarians, riders, and trainers make informed decisions to safeguard endurance horses’ welfare, researchers say.

Posted by Christa Lesté-Lasserre, MA | Dec 17, 2018

If your endurance horse is a stallion, older than 9, and competing in a ride against more than 60 other horses, he’s at increased risk of being eliminated from the race due to lameness at an obligatory veterinary check. And if you, the rider, are male, the risk is even higher.

That’s one of the main findings from a recent study in which researchers in the U.K. investigated risk factors for vet check failures in endurance horses. Their recent study focused on data from all Fédération Equestre Internationale (FEI) endurance events held worldwide from 2010 and 2015—nearly 83,000 starts.

Meanwhile, a race distance of more than 100 kilometers (about 62 miles) is associated with an increased risk of vet check failure due to metabolic issues such as cardiac problems, high temperatures, or respiratory distress. Having a male rider increases the risk of a metabolic issue during a race by 82% compared to female riders, said Euan David Bennet, PhD, research associate in the Weipers Centre for Equine Welfare in the School of Veterinary Medicine at the University of Glasgow, in Scotland...

Read more here:
https://thehorse.com/164245/risk-factors-for-endurance-riding-eliminations/

Feeding Fats to Horses: Not Just a Diet Fad

Thehorse.com - Full Article

Fats serve many important functions for horses, from increasing calorie consumption to reducing gastric ulcer severity.

Posted by Kristen M. Janicki, MS, PAS | Dec 10, 2018

Fats serve many important functions for your horse, from increasing calorie consumption to reducing gastric ulcer severity
Society has seen its share of diet crazes, even in the past decade. From low-carb and high-protein to low-fat and high-fiber, trends have come and gone and come again, making food selection challenging. Luckily, horse owners don’t have as many options when they’re picking their charges’ feed. As herbivores, our horses’ diets must be high-fiber complemented by a commercial product fit to meet their life stage (performance, breeding, growing, etc.). The high-fat diet era began as a way to effectively increase calories without drastically increasing feed volume and, as researchers learn more about the benefit of fats for our four-legged friends, it appears that high-fat diets are here to stay...

Read more here:
https://thehorse.com/18459/feeding-fats-to-horses-not-just-a-diet-fad/

Wednesday, December 12, 2018

Q&A: Kids and Dogs in the Barn—Who is Liable?

HorseNetwork.com - Full Article

December 10 2018
by ARMAND LEONE

Q: I own and operate a boarding stable at which I’ve always allowed boarders to happily bring their children along, however, I’ve never allowed them to bring their dogs. But I’m now getting an increasing number of requests to change that rule! I just worry about scenarios such as a dog spooking a horse and the rider getting hurt. Should I keep my no dog rule as is, or, if I change the rule how do I protect myself against those situations?
A: Great question. In my opinion, there is no reason that you can’t allow dogs if it is something that your boarders have requested, and if you take the necessary precautions.

First, put up signs stating your rules regarding dogs on the property. Common sense comes into play a lot here. Signage that states that dogs must be on a leash puts people on notice that dogs cannot run loose. That’s the first step in protecting yourself from liability from an injury.

The second step is actually enforcing those rules. If you hang up signs stating that dogs must be on a leash but then allow dogs to roam the property at will, you are opening the door to issues...

Read more here:
https://horsenetwork.com/2018/12/qa-kids-dogs-barn-liable/?utm_source=MASTER&utm_campaign=3a868a5504-HNS_2018_12_11_18&utm_medium=email&utm_term=0_5694ca6b0c-3a868a5504-84641243&mc_cid=3a868a5504&mc_eid=b3c9897994

Sunday, December 09, 2018

Learned Helplessness

GreyHorseLLC Blog - Full Article

November 9 2018

Quite a few years ago, I was idling away some time reading the then-current issue of The Chronicle of the Horse magazine (a weekly sport-horse publication). While skimming a pretty dry article about the United States Dressage Federation (USDF) annual convention, I ran across a mention of a guy named Andrew McLean who had been invited to speak to the attendees about the possibility that a thing called “learned helplessness” might be causing “dullness in dressage horses.” I didn’t think another thing of it, skimmed the rest of the magazine and threw it out.

A year later, I found myself in much the same position, at the same time of year, skimming articles in The Chronicle. There was another article about that year’s USDF convention, and another mention of Andrew McLean. But this time, reading between the lines, it sounded like they’d invited him back to take back what he’d said the year before about learned helplessness in dressage horses. NOW they had my attention!

I spent that weekend madly Googling learned helplessness (LH) and Andrew McLean (he’s from Australia). Once I’d gotten a handle on that, I continued to read about LH and think about how it might or might not relate to hundreds of horses I’d seen over the years. I did more research, and more reading.

Now, according to an equine behaviorist I consulted, it is not necessarily scientifically sound to assume that LH occurs in horses. This has not been scientifically proven by scientists, in studies. The seminal studies on LH were done with dogs, and scientists agree it occurs in humans, so scientists would agree that it can occur in dogs and humans. But studies on horses have NOT been done. So strictly speaking, we are going out on a bit of a limb assuming that horses can experience LH. Even so, I think it’s a useful exercise.

So before we can go any further, it’s best if you go read the Wikipedia entry on Learned Helplessness, which is still about the most efficient and succinct definition that I have found so far. If you skip this step, none of the rest of this article will make any sense, so please now read this: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Learned_helplessness

Okay, you’re back! So basically, when a being is in a state of LH, they feel like there is nothing they can do to improve their situation in the moment or “make it stop”. So they give up. Like the dogs in the study, they figuratively and literally lay down and take it. They don’t fight, they don’t try to escape, they surrender, which can look like “agreement” or “submission” or “obedience” to some folks...

Read more here:
https://greyhorsellc.wordpress.com/2018/11/09/learned-helplessness/

Rings and Ridges: What Horse Hooves Reveal

KER.com - Full Article

May 25, 2017
By Kentucky Equine Research Staff

Just as coat condition serves as an indication of health status in horses—sheen and dapples suggest vitality, whereas dull, rough, or half-shed coats imply unthriftiness or disease—changes in hooves may provide clues to a horse’s historical well-being.

The hoof wall is subject to any number of imperfections, and it is commonplace for horses to be beset with shallow or deep cracks, chipped toes, or flares, especially if they are not under the scheduled care of a professional farrier. These flaws are obvious. More subtle changes in the hoof wall, including horizontal rings and ridges, tell more about a horse’s health than the regularity of hoof care.

Hoof rings and ridges sound synonymous, but they are not. In fact, one is a normal feature of even the best-managed hooves; the other, though, is a sign of pathology and potential toxicity...

Read more here:
https://ker.com/equinews/rings-ridges-horse-hooves-reveal/?utm_source=KER+Newsletter&utm_campaign=53b730c445-Focus_December18_HoofHealth&utm_medium=email&utm_term=0_0d95781dfc-53b730c445-11166&mc_cid=53b730c445&mc_eid=6283eb0e4a

Saturday, December 08, 2018

10 Plants and Chemicals That are Toxic to Horses

TheHorse.com - Full Article

Learn about 10 common plants and chemicals your horse should never eat.

Posted by Lindsay Day, REMT | Oct 20, 2018

Review these substances your horse should never eat
There are many things horses should never eat. Certainly, toxic plants rank high on the list of things to avoid, but other substances, organisms, and chemicals can pose risks as well. While poisoning in horses is relatively rare compared to other causes of ill health, when it does occur the consequences can be dire.

“People often assume that horses know what to eat and what not to eat, but that’s just not true in a lot of cases,” says Cynthia Gaskill, DVM, PhD, Dipl. ABVP, associate professor and veterinary clinical toxicologist at the University of Kentucky Veterinary Diagnostic Laboratory. From a curious nibble of a tree branch to accidental consumption of a contaminated grain meal, there are a number of ways horses can ingest toxic substances that put their health—and lives—at risk. Here are our top 10:

Read more here:
https://thehorse.com/148667/10-plants-and-chemicals-that-are-toxic-to-horses/

Friday, December 07, 2018

8 Ways to Be a Good Trail-Riding Buddy

Thehorse.com - Full Article

We all want to be the kind of person other trail riders enjoy being around. Use these eight simple techniques to be a fun and safe riding buddy on the trail.


Posted by Kim McCarrel | Nov 29, 2018

You’re out on a pleasant trail ride with several other riders. Without a word, one of the riders suddenly urges her horse forward and gallops off down the trail. The left-behind horses frantically try to follow. The riders struggle to control their mounts. Pandemonium ensues.

This kind of thoughtless behavior on the trail is no fun to deal with and could cause someone to get seriously hurt. Clearly, leaving your fellow riders in the dust isn’t what you’d expect of a good riding buddy. “Never again!” you say to yourself. “I’ll never ride with her again!”

We all want to be the kind of person other trail riders enjoy being around. By using the eight simple techniques below, you can be a good riding buddy who is fun and safe to ride with on the trail...

Read more here:
https://thehorse.com/163124/8-ways-to-be-a-good-trail-riding-buddy/

Wednesday, December 05, 2018

Feeding Before Exercise

Fiber-fresh.com - Full Article

By Dr Nerida Richards B. Rur Sc PhD (RAnNutr)

The question of whether you should feed a horse before exercise is one that is commonly asked. Most of us were told over and over again by our parents not to swim for 30 minutes after eating or we would get a muscle cramp, so we generally tend to think that eating before exercise is not a wise thing to do. But is this the case for horses? The answer is yes and no…

Empty stomach or full stomach before exercise

The horse is a monogastric and a continuous grazer, so logic says that a horse’s stomach should never be empty. Having a full stomach is important for the horse as it stops gastric acids from the lower part of the stomach splashing around and irritating the upper sections of the gastrointestinal tract. This acid splash that occurs in horses exercised on an empty stomach is thought to contribute to the development of gastric ulcers.

Therefore, if a horse is stabled without constant access to forage, or if it has been more than 2 hours since the horse last grazed or fed, you should feed your horse before exercise. A small feed will protect a horse from gastric ulcers in 2 ways. Chewing the feed will stimulate saliva production and saliva acts as a buffer in the stomach. And the feed will fill up the stomach and prevent gastric acids from splashing around (for more information on Gastric Ulcers you should read FeedXL Newsletter #8 Preventing Gastric Ulcers).

What should you feed before exercise?

What you feed before exercise is very important...

Read more here:
http://www.fiber-fresh.com/equine/feeding-before-exercise/

Tuesday, December 04, 2018

Looking back at one of the UAE's earliest film shoots with Revel Guest

TheNational.ae - Full Article

Chris Newbould
December 2, 2018

Nowadays, it’s a regular occurrence to see international film and TV production crews on the streets, dunes and rooftops of the UAE. The past few years have seen major shoots from Hollywood, Bollywood, Korea, France, China, Finland and beyond land on these shores, with Star Wars: The Force Awakens, Tiger Zinda Hai and two instalments of the Mission Impossible franchise among the biggest names to set up shop here.

Twenty years ago, that was not the case, and veteran filmmaker Revel Guest was among the first international crews to touch down on these shores in 1998, when she made two documentaries – one an episode of the popular American Travel Channel show Trailblazers, and the other an episode of the 26-part documentary Horse Tales which looked at the stables of Sheikh Zayed, the Founding Father, and especially the work of horse whisperer Ali Al Ameri, as they prepared for the 1998 Endurance World Cup in Dubai...

Read more here:
https://www.thenational.ae/arts-culture/film/looking-back-at-one-of-the-uae-s-earliest-film-shoots-with-revel-guest-1.798304

Monday, December 03, 2018

Impact of Abrupt Diet Changes in Horses

KER.com - Full Article

February 1, 2018 By Kentucky Equine Research Staff

Due to the risk of laminitis, horses should not be subjected to abrupt feed changes. The rapid ingestion of unfamiliar concentrates or other feeds high in starch can induce the painful, life-threatening disease, which is characterized by the separation of the hoof wall from the coffin bone.

“Aside from the potential for laminitis, the sudden addition of feeds rich in dietary starch may cause an alteration in the intestinal microbiome,” explained Kathleen Crandell, Ph.D., a nutritionist with Kentucky Equine Research.

The microbiome includes bacteria, fungi, and other microorganisms that help digest fiber and maintain the health of the intestinal tract. That population of microbes forms early in a horse’s life and fluctuates based on diet, transport, stress, exercise, weight loss, and disease state, among other factors.

“In the case of sudden diet changes, that microbiome will also change and not always in a positive way,” Crandell said. “Alterations can adversely affect digestive health and lead to diarrhea, colic, and other forms of intestinal upset...”

Read more here:
https://ker.com/equinews/impact-abrupt-diet-changes-horses/?utm_source=KER+Newsletter&utm_campaign=3f30f42216-KER_Equinews_2_21_18&utm_medium=email&utm_term=0_0d95781dfc-3f30f42216-11166&mc_cid=3f30f42216&mc_eid=6283eb0e4a