Saturday, November 17, 2018

All Breeders’ Cup Equine Drug Tests Come Back Clean

Thehorse.com - Full Article

Breeders’ Cup’s extensive out-of-competition and pre- and post-race testing program at this year’s World Championships involved testing 289 horses.

Posted by Edited Press Release | Nov 9, 2018

There were no positive drug tests—on out-of-competition and pre- and post-race—at this year’s Breeders’ Cup World Championships, the organization announced Nov. 8.

Breeders’ Cup completed an extensive out-of-competition and pre- and post-race testing program at this year’s World Championships, held Nov. 2-3 at Churchill Downs, in Louisville, Kentucky, which included the testing of 289 horses.

This year the organization continued its expansion of its most comprehensive testing program. Out-of-competition testing began in June with all Breeders’ Cup Challenge winners and other targeted possible starters in both North America and overseas and continued right up until the Championship races.

Breeders’ Cup engaged an out-of-competition testing coordinator, William Farmer, DVM, who worked with regulatory associations and with testing laboratories around the world, including the British Horse Racing Authority’s Lab LGC, France Galop’s official Lab LCH, and the Kenneth L. Maddy Equine Analytical Chemistry Laboratory at the University of California, Davis. All three labs are certified by the International Federation of Horseracing Authorities (IFHA). The executive council of the IFHA also specifically endorsed the updated protocols of the Breeders’ Cup which were put in place in advance of last year’s World Championships...

Read more here:
https://thehorse.com/162669/all-breeders-cup-equine-drug-tests-come-back-clean/

What to look for in a horse trailer

Trailmeister.com - Full Article

October 31 2018
by Robert Eversole

As published by Saddle Up Magazine

A horse trailer is a big investment and comes with a lot of big decisions to ensure that we make the right choices for us and our mounts.

Let’s break down these decisions into the main factors to consider. Here are my top considerations for what to look for in a horse trailer.

Size is Important – Does the trailer fit both your animals and you?

horse and mule by trailerYour horse or mule doesn’t get to decide on whether it’s going for a ride so we need to make sure that they’re as comfortable as possible. If the space is too small, he’ll will be cramped, likely unhappy, and may decide that he doesn’t like trailers in the future. Measure your horse from nose to rump (height, length, and width) before going trailer hunting. And consider how many horses you’ll be hauling.

The right trailer is not only comfy for your horse(s), it should be the right size to tow safely behind your vehicle, and hold all the gear you need for your riding and camping adventures. Size is one of my first considerations in what to look for in a horse trailer...

Read more here:
https://www.trailmeister.com/what-to-look-for-in-a-horse-trailer/?utm_source=MailingList&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=Nov2018-general

Thursday, November 15, 2018

100-Mile Musings

GoPony.me - Full Story

NOVEMBER 13, 2018 / ASHLEY WINGERT

I don’t spend a ton of time on Facebook discussion groups, endurance-related or otherwise. I tend to “lurk” — I read and pay attention, but don’t often chime in, mostly because I’ve always tended to keep a fairly low public profile and social media, and use it more for direct interaction with friends and people I know. But I digress. Long story short, a thread on one of the endurance groups popped up in my newsfeed this afternoon and caught my attention.

The gist of the topic? What is stopping people from doing 100s?

Good question. Wish I knew the answer. Especially because I could probably be the poster child for a skeptical eyebrow raise of “Why do you keep doing this?” with all of the ups and downs I’ve experienced along the way. Maybe I’m just a slow learner, because I still have a love affair with wanting to try 100s. I got into endurance with the specific wish and desire to do 100s. Especially Tevis, but all of the 100s (particularly the “buckle” 100s) have appeal to me and are on my “I hope I don’t have to wait until the unforeseeable future to get to do them” list. With my current set-up as a catch-rider, the 100-mile goal becomes that much more elusive, but it doesn’t stop me from hoping/wishing/scheming...

Read more here:
https://gopony.me/2018/11/13/100-mile-musings/

The Unsung Heroes of WWI

FEI.org - Full Artice

9 November 2018

As we mark 100 years since the Armistice Day of November 11, 1918, we look back at the important role that horses and mules played during World War I…

The animals were used as the primary means of achieving military mobility during the First World War.

Mechanisation was in its infancy; so there were few trucks or lorries available and they were mechanically unreliable and road-bound. Every branch of service – infantry, artillery, cavalry, engineers, logistics - was dependent on equids.

They were employed either as riding animals (primarily, but not exclusively, in the cavalry) or, in greater numbers, as draught animals, so they fulfilled both a combatant role in battle, and in supporting logistics.

In fact, the scale of animal use was extraordinary, with the British army alone boasting 510,000 horses by 1918...

“We always think of modern wars as being ‘mechanised’ but in fact the scale of animal use during both world wars was unprecedented. Never before have so many animals been mobilised for military service – unless we recognise this, we fail to understand how modern wars were actually fought,” Gervase Phillips, Principal Lecturer in History at Manchester Metropolitan University, told FEI.org.

Phillips said the greatest single demand was probably for gun-teams to haul artillery pieces. North American mules and North American light draught horses proved especially useful to the British in this role and tens of thousands were brought across the Atlantic.

Throughout the conflict, the British Army deployed more than a million horses and mules, though there weren’t enough horses in Britain to meet demand, so over 1,000 horses a week were shipped from North America...

Read more here:
https://www.fei.org/stories/unsung-heroes-wwi

Sunday, November 04, 2018

Spotting Lameness: The Game Plan

HorseNetwork.com - Full Article

REBECCA DIDIER

Every horse person with a couple of years under her belt has some sense of when a horse looks “off” or “not quite right,” but even when your eye can spy the hitch or hesitation, determining the source of the problem is a challenge few can conquer. Acknowledging that even veterinarians tend to rely more on expensive (and often inconclusive) diagnostic tests rather than well-trained perception to identify lameness and trace it to its origin, Dr. Bob Grisel has written a guide intended to simplify the process. His book Equine Lameness for the Layman instructs all in the fundamental knowledge that can make “seeing” what’s wrong, and what the likely cause is, second nature, ensuring happier, healthier horses. Here he outlines his basic game plan.

***

We visually assess our horses with the intention of recognizing potential lameness and surmising the likely source(s) of the problem. Satisfying our ambition is relatively painless when the horse is noticeably “off”; it can be considerably more difficult when gait abnormalities are visibly faint. Fortunately, we can make lameness more conspicuous by:

• Improving our ability to see it.
• Maximizing the horse’s expression of it.

Choosing the best approach, gait, and setting for our assessment will decidedly support our efforts...

Read more here:
https://horsenetwork.com/2018/10/spotting-lameness-game-plan/?fbclid=IwAR1ACSxyLx6lN_9UPeVAuQ37j7iNi4TvDkSd6DP1FAtsQ-ixjHjdPIQPPoI

Friday, November 02, 2018

Trail Riding Safety Essentials

Thehorse.com - Full Article

Ten things that could save your life when you’re on the trail with your horse.

Posted by Kim McCarrel | Nov 1, 2018

I’ve been a trail rider for a long time, and I’ve experienced my fair share of trail emergencies. I’ve seen injured riders, injured horses, and damaged tack. I’ve fallen off and been hurt, been cold and hungry, and run out of water on a hot day. And I’ve taken a wrong turn and gotten lost.

I’ve learned from those experiences that having the right equipment with you and being prepared can make the difference between a mild misadventure and a disaster.

Experts advise hikers to carry the “10 Essentials for Survival,” including waterproof matches, a flashlight, extra food and water, and a mirror for signaling rescuers. These are important items for horseback riders to carry, too. But we also need a few other things hikers don’t, so here’s my version of the 10 essentials for horseback riders (some might be good for hikers, too):

Read more here:
https://thehorse.com/162195/trail-riding-safety-essentials/