Monday, September 16, 2019

Fortified Concentrate Feed Found to Improve Horses’ Toplines

Thehorse.com - Full Article

Owners who struggle to provide their horses with consistently good-quality forage might be able to improve feed digestibility and topline development by offering these horses a fortified feed, researchers find.

Posted by Alexandra Beckstett, The Horse Managing Editor | Sep 7, 2019

Owners who struggle to provide their horses with consistently good-quality forage might be able to improve feed digestibility and topline development by offering these horses a fortified feed.

Texas A&M University graduate student Mattea Much recently tested this theory and presented her findings at the 2019 Equine Science Society Symposium, held June 3-6 in Asheville, North Carolina.

Much fed 23 stock-type mares either a control diet, consisting of a custom pelleted concentrate (13 mares), or a treatment diet (10 mares), consisting of a pelleted feed fortified with amino acids and trace minerals (SafeChoice senior). The mares received two concentrate meals per day and free-choice Bermuda grass hay...

Read more here:
https://thehorse.com/178414/fortified-concentrate-feed-found-to-improve-horses-toplines/

Friday, September 13, 2019

Make-up of one gene points to racing success of Arabian horses, say reseachers

Horsetalk.co.nz - Full Article

September 13, 2019 Horsetalk.co.nz

Variations within a particular gene in Arabian horses show potential as an indicator of race performance, according to researchers.

Arabian horses are among the oldest and most popular horse breeds in the world, recognised for their athleticism and stamina.

The breed is commonly used in the discipline of Endurance. However, in some countries, 2 to 5-year-olds are introduced to flat race training and often compete in at least one racing season before achieving maturity and undergoing endurance training.

During intensive training, the rates of lactate production and use are critical to avoid muscle fatigue, resulting in a decrease in exercise performance...

Read more at:
https://www.horsetalk.co.nz/2019/09/13/one-gene-racing-success-arabian-horses/

Horses Sans Shoes: The Facts on Bare Feet

TheHorse.com - Full Article

The science of the equine foot is like the hoof itself–expanding and contracting, getting shaped and trimmed. Find out what researchers are learning about the biomechanics of the barefoot hoof.

Posted by Christa Lesté-Lasserre, MA | Sep 11, 2019

What researchers know about the biomechanics of the barefoot hoof
It looks like an ultra-resistant all-weather block, with a shiny, marblelike surface that can trick us into thinking it’s indestructible. Its sharply defined edges give us the impression that it’s as solid as stone—especially when they land with full force on one of our own feet. And its “clip clop” sound striking against hard surfaces betray it as a dense support structure that works like a steel foundation under massive forces.

In reality, though, the equine foot isn’t like this at all.

The foot—or, essentially, the one long toe—is a complex structure filled with bones, tendons, ligaments, arteries, veins, nerves, cartilage, joint fluid, and more. Far from being inert, it’s alive and very active, communicating sensory information, pumping blood, and articulating, contracting, and flexing over ground. And if it’s unshod, it’s constantly changing shape as the horse uses it, instantaneously as well as over time...

Read more here:
https://thehorse.com/160548/horses-sans-shoes-the-facts-on-bare-feet/

Mil's Life - a Real Life Urban Cowboy

FEI.org - Full Article

14 September 2019
Words by Hannah Spreckley

An award-winning documentary tells the true story of how horses changed a young man's life in inner-city Philadelphia...

With the backdrop of the grimy streets of North Philadelphia, a man on a horse strides into focus – setting the scene for a superb short documentary about the close relationship formed between a man and his horse

‘Mil's Life’ is the story of 26-year-old urban cowboy and native Philadelphian, Jamil ‘Mil’ Pratis, and how these animals, specifically his one-eyed horse Dusty, have had a major effect on changing the course of his life.

The 25-minute documentary focuses on Mil's passion for horses in an unusual setting. If you thought that equestrian sport was only ever for the wealthy and privileged, this will change your view! Set amongst the poverty and urban decay of North Philly, where gangs and drugs are rife, Mil’s Life is an almost unbelievable story of how one young man’s life was altered by the Fletcher Street Riding Club...

Read more here:
https://www.fei.org/stories/mils-life-real-life-urban-cowboy

Horse Boarding: Legal Rights and Responsibilities

EquineLegalSolutions.com - Full Article

At Equine Legal Solutions, we receive a lot of calls from horse owners and boarding stables that are unhappy with a situation and want to know what their legal rights are. In the four states where we practice, California, New York, Oregon and Washington, there are no laws governing horse boarding, other than animal cruelty statutes and local zoning regulations governing use of the property. Landlord/tenant law generally does not apply to horse boarding relationships unless the boarder lives on the stable property. Therefore, in general, the terms of horse boarding relationships are governed solely by contract (written or verbal).

What are the minimum accommodations a boarding stable is legally required to provide?

Unless the boarding contract says otherwise, a boarding stable is only required to provide the absolute minimum level of care – i.e., not violate state animal cruelty laws. State law generally requires providing access to potable water. Beyond that, requirements vary, but are usually quite minimal. For example, depending on the state and local laws, a boarding stable may not be legally required to provide shelter, and there may be no restriction on the number of horses that a boarding facility can keep on a particular piece of property. So, having a written horse boarding contract that spells out all of the important terms and conditions is essential for both boarding stable and boarder! ELS offers a downloadable horse boarding contract and forms package.

How much notice is a boarder required to give a boarding stable before moving out?

Boarding contracts usually say how much notice a boarder is required to give before leaving, and often, it is 30 days. However, if there is no boarding contract, or the boarding contract does not say what notice is required, the boarder can give as little as same-day notice.

Does a boarder have to give a boarding stable written notice before moving out?...

Read more here:
https://www.equinelegalsolutions.com/boarding-rights-and-responsibilities.html

Tuesday, September 10, 2019

How to Ride Your Horse Down a Steep Trail Safely

Horse-canada.com - Full Article

Trainer Jason Irwin offers tips for teaching your horse how to travel carefully down a steep trail, slow and steady to keep you both safe.

By: Jason Irwin | July 4, 2019

The safest way to ride down a steep trail is slow and steady. The faster your horse goes down a steep trail, the more his weight is on his front end. The problem with that is if he trips and his weight is already on his front, he’s pretty likely to stumble or possibly fall. If he goes slower, his weight is probably going to be on his back end, which means he’ll be less likely to stumble, and if he does there’s a much better chance that he’ll easily recover from it.

To get your horse going downhill slow, start with trails that aren’t very steep. Ride down small hills and stop him several times before you get to the bottom. This will cause him to think of going down hills as a time to go slow. If you feel him start to rush, stop immediately and back him up a few steps. Backing up a hill is a lot of work for a horse, so this is a mild reprimand for rushing and it also really causes him to use his hind end...

Read more here:
https://horse-canada.com/magazine_articles/ride-horse-steep-trail-safely

Sunday, September 08, 2019

Omeprazole and Calcium Digestibility: What Horse Owners Should Know

KER.com - Full Article

July 15, 2019
By Kentucky Equine Research Staff

Omeprazole, the only FDA-approved drug for healing gastric ulcers in horses, may cause reduced calcium digestibility, according to a recent study conducted at Kentucky Equine Research. What does this finding mean to horse owners who rely on the medication to keep their horses healthy?

Gastric Ulcers in Horses and Omeprazole

Researchers estimate 40-90% of horses have gastric ulcers, with those engaged in certain athletic disciplines, such as racing, at higher risk. Excessive gastric acid production ranks as a primary trigger for the development of ulcers. Omeprazole prevents gastric acid secretion in horses, thus rendering it an effective treatment for ulcers.

Omeprazole and other drugs known as proton pump inhibitors are used to treat acid-related conditions in humans. When given to humans, reduced gastric acid production is associated with a decline in the digestibility of several nutrients, including protein, fat, calcium, iron, and vitamin B12.

In horses, however, the effect of omeprazole on nutrient digestibility was unknown.

A study was therefore designed to determine the effect of short-term administration of omeprazole on the digestibility of several nutrients.

Researchers found that omeprazole did not affect the digestibility of dry matter, crude protein, fat, acid detergent fiber, neutral detergent fiber, starch, or water-soluble carbohydrates. Omeprazole did not change the digestibility of any mineral except calcium. Calcium digestibility decreased by as much as 20% in horses given omeprazole...

Read more here:
https://ker.com/equinews/omeprazole-and-calcium-digestibility-what-horse-owners-should-know/?utm_source=KER+Newsletter&utm_campaign=7cb74ca8f2-Focus_on_Ulcers&utm_medium=email&utm_term=0_0d95781dfc-7cb74ca8f2-11166

Saturday, September 07, 2019

Ten Reasons to Love Sticky Ichthammol Ointment

EquusMagazine.com - Full Article

It may be smelly, sticky and sort of gross, but the drawing salve ichthammol can't be beat in terms of versatility and affordability.

THE EDITORS OF EQUUS MAGAZINE
UPDATED:MAR 10, 2017
ORIGINAL:MAR 5, 2012

Messy, smelly and downright gross, the drawing salve called ichthammol may not be your first choice for treating your horse, but you can't beat its versatility and affordability. The sticky ointment, a derivative of coal tar, reduces inflammation, draws out infection, kills germs and soothes pain.

Here are 10 uses for ichthammol:

1. Pack it around and over draining hoof punctures to draw out pus...

Read more here:
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