Tuesday, February 20, 2018

Four Dietary Tips for Healthy Horse Transport

KER.com - Full Article

March 15, 2016
By Kentucky Equine Research Staff

Even the shortest trip in a horse trailer for the most seasoned equine jet-setter causes some level of stress due to isolation, confinement, noise, vibration, and altered balance. In addition, physical injuries, respiratory diseases, colic, laminitis, enterocolitis, and tying-up pose real concerns for horses and owners during transport.

“Considering the impact of diet prior to and during transport can make the difference between arriving with a healthy or sick horse,” advised Kathleen Crandell, Ph.D., equine nutritionist at Kentucky Equine Research (KER).

According to a recent study*, there are four key ways owners can minimize adverse health effects when shipping horses:

Read more here:
https://ker.com/equinews/four-dietary-tips-healthy-horse-transport/?utm_source=KER+Newsletter&utm_campaign=46f302930e-Focus_digestive&utm_medium=email&utm_term=0_0d95781dfc-46f302930e-11166&mc_cid=46f302930e&mc_eid=6283eb0e4a

Friday, February 16, 2018

ELD and CDL Webinar Recording

Horsecouncil.org - Listen

February 14 2018

While registration filled up quickly for the AHC's First Quarter 2018 webinar on the Electronic Logging Device (ELD) and Commercial Drivers License (CDL) requirements, the AHC recorded the webinar in order to share with our members.

This is a multifactorial issue, with requirements for a CDL varying from state to state. The AHC is planning on hosting a second webinar on this topic in the coming weeks, and will be meeting with the Department of Transportation this coming Friday to further address how to best communicate the complexities of the requirements to the equine industry.

The AHC recommends contacting your state Department of Transportation for specific questions on the CDL regulations for your state. To view a list of state by state contacts, please click here.

If you have any questions, please contact the AHC at info@horsecouncil.org .



Wednesday, February 14, 2018

Conditions of conditioning – Tips for spring conditioning

Tryondailybulletin.com - Full Article

By Catherine Hunter
February 13, 2018

Spring is just around the corner — the crickets and bullfrogs are starting to sing and the warm weather is coming.

If it ever stops raining long enough to ride, Foothills horse lovers will again be enjoying the trails after this exceptionally cold winter.

While we are all shaking off a little cabin fever, it is important to consider the horse’s condition if they have been off from work through the winter. Asking a horse to go on a long or fast ride when they are not in shape can not only damage the horse’s heart, wind, tendons, joints and muscles, it can betray the animal’s trust, and make them fear being ridden again.

Walking and trotting is the best place to start a fitness program. Rides in the beginning of the conditioning program should be kept short, approximately 20 to 30 minutes, and can gradually increase as the horse gains stamina.

In the beginning of the program, the rider should limit the number of days per week the horse is ridden. If the horse has done nothing but loaf in the field since early November, a five-day per week program will be too much to start. Consider riding one or two days, and then giving the horse a day or two off. If the rider wants to ride more often, she can gradually build up to five or more days a week...

Read more here:
http://www.tryondailybulletin.com/2018/02/13/conditions-of-conditioning-tips-for-spring-conditioning/

Rutgers Seminar Focuses On Equine Gastrointestinal Health

Tapinto.net - Full Article

By LILLIAN SHUPE
February 13, 2018 at 12:51 PM

NEW BRUNSWICK, N.J. — Horse owners gathered on a rainy Feb. 11 to learn more about gastrointestinal health and management at the Horse Management Seminar hosted by the Rutgers Equine Science Center and Rutgers Cooperative Extension.

Dr. Burt Staniar from Pennsylvania State University got things started with “How does physically effective fiber behave in the equine gut? – A visual tour.” He said that the effect of the particle size of different feeds and how it affects digestion has been studied in cattle, but not in horses. But horses are not cows and more study needs to be done, he said. He said the larger the pieces of feed are, the more the horse has to chew. The more it chews, the more saliva is produced. More saliva means the acids in the stomach are better buffered and that prevents ulcer formation...

Read more here:
https://www.tapinto.net/towns/milltown-slash-spotswood/articles/rutgers-seminar-focuses-on-equine-gastrointestina-15

Friday, February 09, 2018

Australia: Rare horse calls Southern Downs home

Warwickdailynews.com.au - Full Artice

9 February 2017
by Marian Faa

AMANDA Watson has been around horses her whole life but when she met Chester the 'curly', she knew she'd struck a rare find.

Looking at Chester, you might think someone had taken a crimping iron to his mane and perming product to his coat, but the fact is his wavy locks are completely natural.

The unusual breed originated in North America from a genetic quirk that developed in appaloosas and quarter horses over the years.

Chester is a one of only 100 curly horses in Australia and 5000 in the world, but he now calls Amiens, just outside of Stanthorpe his new home.

The two-year old chestnut gelding stumbled into Ms Watson's arms on Australia Day when she went travelled to Orange to meet one of two curly horse breeders in Australia on the recommendation of a friend...

Read more here:
https://www.warwickdailynews.com.au/news/rare-horse-calls-southern-downs-home/3330950/

Saturday, February 03, 2018

Equi-Force to Participate in a Free Live Webinar: Health Gut, Healthy Horse

January 30 2018

Lexington, KY (January 30, 2018) –Until recently, the importance of equine gastrointestinal health has been both undervalued and misunderstood. Join Dr. Amy Gill, Equi-Force founder, for a free educational webinar “Healthy Gut, Healthy Horse” on Tuesday, February 13, 2018.

Factors such as physical and psychological stress, an unbalanced diet, antibiotics, and an oversupply of starches and sugars can result in inflammation and erosion in the horse’s gut wall. This inflammation and erosion allows bacteria and toxins to escape the intestinal lining and enter through to the horse’s circulatory system. Bacteria and other metabolites/toxins in the bloodstream can lead to a variety of disorders that will negatively affect the short- and long-term health of the horse.

During the webinar, Dr. Gill will discuss the most advanced techniques available to help combat digestive dysfunction in horses and how using nutrition therapeutically can provide the horse with the raw materials it needs to prevent and correct gastrointestinal disorders and disease.

This webinar is FREE and can be attended via your phone or computer. However, you must register to attend.

Reserve your spot at https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/5577659048822308865.

Date: February 13, 2018
Time: 4.30 Pacific, 6:30 Central, 7:30 Eastern
Place: On your computer or phone
Speakers: Dr. Amy Gill

About Equi-Force

In 2006, Dr. Gill developed a proprietary line of targeted nutrient therapies called EQUI-FORCE™ Equine Products, LLC. These products were formulated with the goal of helping to alleviate clinical symptoms associated with developmental orthopedic disorders, assist in the repair of damaged or abnormal bone and soft tissue, correct metabolic imbalances, improve tolerance to exercise and prevent muscle myopathies in the performance horse.

For further information on EQUI-FORCE products, please visit www.equiforce.com. You can also follow EQUI-FORCE at www.facebook.com/EquiForceEquineProducts/.

Friday, February 02, 2018

Feeding the Ulcer-Prone Horse

Thehorse.com - Full Article

By Kristen M. Janicki, MS, PAS
Jan 14, 2018

How to craft a diet for the horse with painful lesions in his stomach


Which horses would you traditionally consider “ulcer-prone”? Racehorses in training? Western pleasure horses showing competitively on the American Quarter Horse Association circuit? Pony Clubbers’ games ponies? Injured horses on stall rest? Truth is, you could be right with any one of these.

Equine gastric ulcer syndrome (EGUS) can plague any age, breed, or sex, and the risk factors are many—certain types of training and exercise, nutrition, feeding practices, and stabling, to name a few. Let’s take a look at one very important aspect of preventing and managing ulcers: diet.
The Facts and Stats

The Equine Gastric Ulcer Council defines EGUS as a disease complex associated with ulceration of the esophageal, gastric, or duodenal mucosa. Clinical signs can include a reduced or poor appetite, weight loss, a dull skin and hair coat, attitude or behavior changes, impaired performance, reluctance to work, and colic. Researchers have yet to determine a very reliable detection method for ulcers via blood and fecal markers. Therefore, veterinarian-performed gastroscopy (viewing the horse’s stomach using a flexible lighted instrument passed through his nostril) is the only accurate diagnostic test.

The council estimates that 30-50% of all foals and more than 50% of symptomatic ones have ulcers, and about 90% of symptomatic mature horses (older than 2) have ulcers. In the absence of any outward signs, about half of all mature horses have ulcers...

Read more here:
http://www.thehorse.com/articles/38693/feeding-the-ulcer-prone-horse?utm_source=Newsletter&utm_medium=nutrition&utm_campaign=01-15-2018

Thursday, February 01, 2018

Contact Your Representative to Suspend the ELD Mandate

AQHA.org

The American Quarter Horse Association requests a one-year enforcement delay to the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA) electronic logging device (ELD) mandate.

January 26, 2018
American Quarter Horse Association

The American Quarter Horse Association is involved with requests to delay the impending Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA) electronic logging device (ELD) mandate for one year. The mandate went into effect on December 18, 2017. At that time, livestock haulers were granted a 90-day waiver to comply with the mandate, and that waiver will expire March 18, 2018.

The rule limits the amount of time a commercial truck driver can drive and mandates a specific amount of off-duty/non-driving time, and requires the use of electronic logging devices to track the driving and non-driving times.

While there are some exemptions from the ELD mandate for farm and agricultural hauling, many of the rigs used for hauling horses and the activities horse owners participate in may not be exempt.

AQHA and other livestock organizations are concerned about the regulation requiring 10 consecutive hours off duty and how that will affect the welfare of animals being transported. Livestock industry guidelines recommend that drivers avoid stops when hauling livestock, as stopping for long periods of time would have a detrimental effect on the animals being hauled.

AQHA Executive Vice President Craig Huffhines commented on the National Pork Producer Council’s request to United State Department of Transportation for a waiver and exemption from the ELD mandate for livestock haulers. AQHA supports the exemption and is pursuing a one-year delay to address the additional issues created by changes to 49 CFR Part 395.

“AQHA members are involved in showing, racing, ranching, rodeos and recreation, and it is common for AQHA members to haul their horses interstate over long distances (much like other livestock haulers),” Huffhines said in his letter to the DOT. “We encourage the Department of Transportation to grant a one-year enforcement delay followed by a waiver and limited exemptions from compliance with the December 18, 2017, implementation date for the final rule on ELDs and hours of service. This will allow the department the opportunity to take appropriate steps to alleviate any unintended consequences that this mandate may have on the hauling of horses or other livestock.”

More at:
https://www.aqha.com/news/2018/january/01262018-please-contact-your-representative-to-suspend-the-eld-mandate/