Friday, February 22, 2019

Great Britain: New guidance on the movement of horses and other equines in a no deal Brexit scenario

Gov.uk

The government has issued guidance for owners of equines on the preparations they need to make

Published 21 February 2019
From:
Department for Environment, Food & Rural Affairs and David Rutley MP

The Government has today issued guidance for owners of horses, ponies and other equines on the preparations they need to made in the event of a ‘no deal’ Brexit.

Leaving the EU with a deal remains the Government’s top priority. This has not changed. We are continuing with our ‘no deal’ preparations to ensure the country is prepared for every eventuality.

The guidance will help owners to navigate the new processes for moving horses and other equine animals from the UK to EU member states. This will also apply to those owners who currently move their animals between the UK, Ireland and France under the Tripartite Agreement (TPA) – an agreement relied on by many in the horseracing industry and the competition sector.

If the UK leaves the EU on 29 March without a deal:

equines travelling from the UK to the EU may need to undergo additional blood tests, which will need to be carried out within 30 days or less of travelling to satisfy EU regulations
owners will need to consult with a vet at least six weeks before they are planning to travel
all equines will need an Export Health Certificate in order to travel to EU states, instead of current documents, and will need to enter the EU via a Border Inspection Post (BIP)
some equines will also need a Government issued travel ID document, as well as their existing equine passport
The UK has already committed to allowing continued movement on all equine animals from EU member states to support the industries that rely on these animals and ahead of major horseracing events, such as the Grand National Festival at Aintree.

The government is continuing to negotiate with the European Commission on securing listed status for the UK, which would enable the continued movement of equines to EU member states.

The guidance published today is designed to give the owners of horses and other equine animals as much time to prepare for these new processes and factor in any extra travel time they may require when travelling to and from the EU.

Animal Welfare Minister David Rutley said:

Delivering a negotiated deal with the EU remains the Government’s top priority, but it is our job to responsibly ensure we are prepared for all scenarios, including no deal.

This guidance will help businesses and owners prepare for life after 29 March if we do leave without a deal. However, it is in the interest of the EU to reciprocate our commitment on the movement of horses. This will ensure horseracing and competition events across the continent can continue to be attended by all of Europe’s top equine talent.

Julian Richmond Watson, Chairman of the Thoroughbred Breeders Association, said:

The British thoroughbred racing and breeding industry welcomes publication of this important guidance and will be communicating it to our participants to help them prepare for all potential Brexit negotiation outcomes.

We fully support the Government’s welcome and pragmatic position to allow continued equine movement under current systems from EU member states to the UK in a no deal scenario.

Nick Fellows, Chief Executive of the British Equestrian Federation (BEF), said:

The BEF has worked closely with government and leading figures in equestrian sport to make sure that all horse owners have as much information as possible for when the UK leaves the European Union. It’s important to prepare for all eventualities and we’d urge all horse owners to take notice of the material provided by Defra.

If the UK is not provided with listed status by the European Commission, no movements of equines from the UK to the EU will be possible after we leave the EU until listed status is secured.

Businesses that may be affected should read the latest guidance on equine movements.

Wednesday, February 20, 2019

Presidents on Horseback

WhiteHouseHistory.org - Full Article

Military heroes who risked their lives in devotion to the nation have long been attractive presidential candidates. The image of a uniformed officer on a warhorse was a powerful symbol of leadership and executive ability. Presidents depicted in equestrian art include military heroes such as George Washington, Andrew Jackson, William Henry Harrison, Zachary Taylor, Franklin Pierce, Ulysses S. Grant, Rutherford B. Hayes, James A. Garfield, and Benjamin Harrison. Warhorses like Taylor’s Old Whitey and Grant’s Egypt and Cincinnati enjoyed honored retirement at the White House.

With the invention of photography and the popularity of illustrated magazines and newspapers in the late nineteenth century, images of the presidents posed on horseback became a staple for photojournalists. Pictures of the chief executive and their families on horseback became a familiar subject for posed photographs. President and first ladies regularly rode horses for exercise and relaxation in public both in the city parks of Washington, D.C., and on vacation. This practice changed after World War II transformed security procedures...

Read more here:
https://www.whitehousehistory.org/presidents-on-horseback?utm_medium=40digest.7days3.20190219.home&utm_source=email&utm_content=&utm_campaign=campaign

Sunday, February 17, 2019

Is Muscle Disease is Contributing to a Horse’s Poor Performance?

Thehorse.com - Full Article

Attention to certain details during exams and careful consideration of test results can help a veterinarian arrive at a diagnosis, making way for an appropriate management.

Posted by Erica Larson, News Editor | Feb 16, 2019

Lack of energy under saddle, a poor attitude during exercise, chronic back pain, hollowing over jumps. These are all possible signs of low-grade or chronic muscle disease, which can be difficult to diagnose. But one researcher reports that attention to certain details and careful consideration of test results can help a veterinarian arrive at a diagnosis, making way for an appropriate management.

At the 2018 American Association of Equine Practitioners Convention, held Dec. 2-5 in San Francisco, California, Stephanie Valberg, DVM, PhD, Dipl. ACVIM, ACVSMR, the Mary Anne McPhail Dressage Chair in Equine Sports Medicine at the Michigan State University’s College of Veterinary Medicine, in East Lansing, reviewed how she determines whether muscle disease is behind a horse’s poor performance...

Read more here:
https://thehorse.com/166342/is-muscle-disease-is-contributing-to-a-horses-poor-performance/

Thursday, February 14, 2019

Meet the 'Horse Barber' creating spectacular equine designs

Cnn.com - Full Story and photos

By Ben Church, CNN
Updated 7:55 AM ET, Tue February 12, 2019

(CNN)By combining her two passions, Melody Hames produces some of the most unexpected and spectacular designs in the equine world.
Dubbed the "Horse Barber," the design graduate has set up her own business clipping creative artwork into the hair of horses.
"They've all got a unique meaning," Hames told CNN Sport. "I've always been into art and design anyway so I love to do it..."

Read and see more at:
https://www.cnn.com/2019/02/12/sport/horse-barber-clipping-art-winning-post-spt-intl/index.html

Wednesday, February 13, 2019

ROC the Standardbred launches ambassador program

USTrottingNews.com

February 11, 2019, by Alyssa Hedges, for ROC the Standardbred

The group, founded by Alyssa Hedges in 2015, started on Facebook to connect Standardbred lovers and has since grown in size and mission. ROC the Standardbred has formed a board and applied for 501(c)3 not-for-profit recognition. The group’s primary mission is to create a market for Standardbreds as a pleasure horse and their breed ambassador program was designed to help them reach that goal.

Their 2019 lineup features 16 horse and rider teams that include the following:
• a pony-Standardbred cross to multi-million dollar winner Golden Receiver;
• horses aged 5 – 21;
• bays to greys to chestnuts;
• three blind-in-one-eye horses;
• some who raced and others who didn’t make it to the track;
• adoptees to those who never left their race family; and
• riders age 15 and up.

Teams are located throughout New York, Ohio, New Jersey, Maryland and even Canada. They will be found doing everything from barrel racing, to dressage, to hunter/jumpers, to mounted archery and even RUS. Aiming to prove just how versatile Standardbreds are, the team is excited to share the breed with the horse world. The ultimate goal is to drive up adoption rates from Standardbred rescues/transition programs and also to give those in the business alternative options for selling horses retiring from the track.

To keep up on all of the action, you can join ROC the Standardbred’s Facebook group or follow them on Instagram!

Website – www.rocthestandardbred.org
Facebook – www.facebook.com/groups/ROCtheStandardbred
Instagram – @rocthestandardbred

Tuesday, February 12, 2019

Great Britain: Rider who lost horse to Cushing’s diagnosed with the same condition

Horseandhound.co.uk - Full Article

Sarah Radford
11 February, 2019 07:06

When celebrity portrait photographer Lucy Sewill’s much-loved endurance mare had to be put down as a result of Cushing’s, she had a sudden realisation — she was suffering from the condition herself.

Horses have been part of Lucy’s life since childhood and her passion for them was reflected in her 2016 book Horses and Humans, which featured equestrian celebrities William Fox-Pitt and Chilli Morning, Kelly Marks and American Pie, Monty Roberts and Shy Boy and Dickie Waygood.

Lucy is a believer in the “special bond between horses and humans”, which she said helped her find the answer to debilitating symptoms that had plagued her for years.

“The relationships we have with our horses are so life-enhancing,” she said. ”The way animals and humans relate is extraordinary — including highlighting things that are wrong with us.”

An FEI endurance rider, Lucy had previously completed 100-mile rides with her 23-year-old Anglo-Arab Nutcracker. The mare had been enjoying a quieter life — although still “fit, athletic and active” — when she suffered a dramatic onset of symptoms...

Read more at https://www.horseandhound.co.uk/news/rider-lost-horse-cushings-diagnosed-condition-678875#AYogKjC2u6djsekE.99

Understanding Antioxidant Supplements for Horses

KER.com - Full Article

April 25, 2017
By Kentucky Equine Research Staff

Many owners offer their horses antioxidant supplements. In some cases, this might be without a solid understanding of what antioxidants do and how they benefit horses. To better appreciate how oxygen is both vital and dangerous to a horse’s body and the role antioxidants play in combating “oxidative stress,” take this short, 10-point crash course on understanding antioxidants.

1. Oxygen is 100% essential for almost all living creatures. Inhaled oxygen drives metabolic processes and helps cells produce energy.

2. In typical Jekyll and Hyde style, some oxygen molecules form damaging “reactive oxygen species” (ROS) while producing energy. These molecules are also called free radicals...

Read more here:
KER.com

Friday, February 08, 2019

Getting Properly Hitched

USRider.org - Full Article

The proper marriage of your trailer and truck revolves around understanding trailer hitches-and the important function they serve in the hauling process.

By Equus | 1/31/2019

You're considering towing your horses. One of the most confusing and scary aspects of this adventure is the myriad kinds of trailer hitches available to buy. It might seem like there are hundreds. In reality, there are only a handful, but they come in a large variety of sizes and capacities.

Of course, you want to select the right hitch, not only so it matches your trailer's coupler, but-probably most importantly-so that it has adequate capacity to safely carry the full weight of your horses and any additional loads.

Glossary of Terms
To start, let's define some terms you'll need to know to discuss hitches and towing with hitch and trailer retailers...

Read more here.

Thursday, February 07, 2019

Great Britain: Cyclist found guilty after hitting horse and rider during Windsor triathlon

Horseandhound.co.uk - Full Article and Video

Becky Murray
28 January, 2019

A cyclist has been convicted after a horse and rider were hit during a triathlon.

Iain Plumb, 32, of Chaucer Road, Crowthorne, Berkshire, was found guilty of one count of riding a cycle on a road without reasonable consideration for others following the incident which happened during the Windsor triathlon on 17 June 2018.

The rider, Jennifer Katherine, shared hat camera footage of a number of cyclists undertaking her which has receieved more than five million views. She said one of the cyslists hit her and her horse, causing him to jump sideways and pull off a hind shoe, but the cyclist did not stop...

Read more at https://www.horseandhound.co.uk/news/cyclist-found-guilty-hitting-horse-rider-windsor-triathlon-677714#HBm1q01fmgTyhM1k.99

Wednesday, February 06, 2019

Starch in Horse Diets

Thehorse.com - Full Article

Although it can be damaging if fed improperly, starch can be an important part of horse diets. Here’s what you should know.

Posted by Kristen M. Janicki, MS, PAS | Feb 4, 2019

Starch is a highly digestible energy form and can provide horses with energy they need for exercise, growth, metabolism, and other life functions. However, when fed improperly, this nonstructural carbohydrate can be detrimental to your horse’s health.

Most of the energy contained in grains, such as corn and oats, and a percentage of the energy from forage is starch. During digestion, starch is broken down primarily in the horse’s small intestine by an enzyme called amylase. This process efficiently produces glucose, a type of simple sugar essential for fueling some bodily functions.

The amount of starch consumed at one time also affects the amount of starch digested in the small intestine...

Read more here:
https://thehorse.com/118110/starch-in-horse-diets/

Tuesday, February 05, 2019

Bahrain: Amazing charm of a royal welcome at the endurance village

NewsOfBahrain.com - Full Article

SAMIRA DANOUNI
OP-ED - FEBRUARY 04, 2019

Growing up in an urban setting and amid high rise buildings, the only things I knew about horses were scenes of John Wayne riding rhythmically and at times gloriously on his black, brown or white steeds striding out in the open desert, or of Zorro’s black Tornado adroitly evading being caught. The equine characters that populated the Little House on the prairie were also a source of fascination for me as I was discovering, thanks to our television set, a world that was vastly different from mine.

I never had the chance to be physically close to horses, so although they looked recognisable enough to me and I could tell the difference between a dignified trot and a full out gallop, they remained fascinating, but mysterious creatures. My first close contact with real horses was in February 2005 when as a teacher at Bahrain School, I was amazingly lucky to be able to arrange a trip for students to the Royal Stables thanks to a kind invitation from Tawfiq Salehi, the head of the media office of HH Shaikh Nasser bin Hamad Al Khalifa.

Tawfiq, Bu Ahmed as he is called, was a real gentleman and made it effortlessly easy for us to visit the stables where we had the immense pleasure of meeting HH Shaikh Nasser and his brothers HH Shaikh Khalid and HH Shaikh Faisal, may God rest his soul in eternal peace. They took us into the world of horses, providing us with information that we all took in with great anticipation, so eager we were to comprehend the nature of these lovely, harmless and intriguing animals. The visit lasted about four hours and its effects on us were enormous...

Read more here:
http://www.newsofbahrain.com/op-ed/50895.html