Saturday, January 19, 2019

What your horse's hair whirls and whorls may mean

Equusmagazine.com - Full Article

Research shows that the direction of a horse's "cowlicks" provides clues to how he will behave when he spooks.
MICK MCCLUSKEY, BVSC, MACVSCJAN 11, 2019

New research suggests there’s a surprisingly simple way of predicting whether a spooking horse will turn to the right or left: Check out his facial whorls.

The equivalent of “cowlicks” in people, whorls are swirling patterns of hair; they are commonly seen on the forehead but can appear anywhere on a horse’s coat. The location and direction of whorls in humans are linked to early fetal brain development. In fact, abnormal whorls are common in children with developmental disorders...

Read more here:
https://equusmagazine.com/horse-world/whirls-hair-whorls-54193

Wednesday, January 16, 2019

Shoeing the Low-Heeled Horse

Thehorse.com - Full Article

Some effects of the shoeing strategies farriers use to correct low heels in horses can actually be detrimental in the long run. Here’s how one farrier recommends correcting this frustrating lameness cause.

Posted by Alexandra Beckstett, The Horse Managing Editor | Oct 31, 2018

Low heels, also called underrun or collapsed heels, can be a frustrating cause of lameness in horses. Further, the effects of the shoeing strategies used to correct them can actually be detrimental in the long run.

So Simon Curtis, FWCF, BSc(Hons), PhD, HonAssocRCVS, an award-winning farrier based in Newmarket, Suffolk, U.K., proposed a long-term solution to the issue at the 2018 British Equine Veterinary Association Congress, held Sept. 12-15 in Birmingham, U.K.

While the terms low and underrun are often used interchangeably when describing horses’ hooves, they do differ.

“A low-heeled horse is one where the digit has a low angle but aligned hoof-pastern axis (HPA, how the front hoof wall aligns with the pastern) and the caudal (rear) hoof wall is not bent,” Curtis explained. “Underrun heels are associated with a negative HPA (when the pastern angle is steeper than the hoof wall) and are long and folded under the solar hoof capsule...”

Read more here:
https://thehorse.com/162245/shoeing-the-low-heeled-horse/

Tuesday, January 15, 2019

How Much Hay To Feed Horses: Where To Begin

KER.com - Full Article

September 13, 2018
By Kentucky Equine Research Staff

Horses thrive on diets rife with forages, whether it is a medley of pasture grasses, baled hay, or another forage product, such as hay cubes, hay pellets, or haylage. They are capable of processing huge quantities of forage to meet their nutritional demands, but where does a horse owner start in determining how much forage to feed?

An estimate can be made based on the horse’s age, body weight, and physiologic state. Here’s a quick reference table to illustrate expected forage consumption by horses...

Read more here:
https://ker.com/equinews/much-hay-feed-horses-begin/?utm_source=KER+Newsletter&utm_campaign=1686f16575-Focus_Jan19_Forage&utm_medium=email&utm_term=0_0d95781dfc-1686f16575-11166&mc_cid=1686f16575&mc_eid=6283eb0e4a

Monday, January 14, 2019

Female Ranchers Are Reclaiming the American West

NYTimes.com - Full Article

As men leave animal agriculture for less gritty work, more ranches are being led by women — with new ideas about technology, ecology and the land.


Photographs by Amanda Lucier
Written by Amy Chozick

Jan. 11, 2019

Hundreds of years before John Wayne and Gary Cooper gave us a Hollywood version of the American West, with men as the brute, weather-beaten stewards of the land, female ranchers roamed the frontier. They were the indigenous, Navajo, Cheyenne and other tribes, and Spanish-Mexican rancheras, who tended and tamed vast fields, traversed rugged landscapes with their dogs, hunted, and raised livestock.

The descendants of European settlers brought with them ideas about the roles of men and women, and for decades, family farms and ranches were handed down to men. Now, as mechanization and technology transform the ranching industry, making the job of cowboy less about physical strength — though female ranchers have that in spades — and more about business, animal husbandry and the environment, women have reclaimed their connection to the land...

Read more here:
https://www.nytimes.com/2019/01/11/business/women-ranchers-american-west-photo-essay.html

Sunday, January 13, 2019

Must Have Items for Trail Rides

Traiilmeister.com - Full Article

by Robert Eversole

What Do You Rely on When the Day Goes Downhill?

As published by Western Mule Magazine Nov, 2104

My failure to look at a calendar recently resulted in the good fortune of meeting a fellow Western Mule reader, Mr. John H. of the Spokane, Washington area. John is the President of the North Idaho Saddle Mule Club, an all around good guy and a real backcountry resource who teaches the art of survival to military personnel. He’s the real deal.

I had pulled into the location where my Backcountry Horsemen Chapter holds its monthly meetings. That I didn’t recognize many of the faces that were milling about didn’t phase me since I’m not a regular at our gatherings; after all I’d rather be riding. Well I must have looked out of place and John greeted me with “Are you here for the Mule Club?” Well, Mrs. Eversole raised me to always look for the positive and the Mule Club was having a potluck so I stayed!

A few days later John and I ran into each other again and like riders around the world we started talking about some of our various trips. The conversation soon veered towards tales of trail accidents, what riders can do to prepare for these “just in case” situations, and the sad fact that most riders don’t prepare at all.

Even an easy front country “just a day ride” can very quickly turn into a nightmare should the unthinkable happen. If you’re injured and come off your mount how you’ve prepared for the unexpected can well make the difference between an inconvenience and far worse.

The core of these preparations is often referred to as the Ten Essentials that you should never leave the trailhead without. That means never. Ever. The couple of pounds that these essentials represent are not “extra” they are critical. I see many riders who have heard of this concept but still fail to head the advice. Why not? I think a lot of it is the “it won’t happen to me” syndrome. Well, maybe it won’t but are you willing to bet your life on fair skies and no accidents? I’m not...

Read more here:
https://www.trailmeister.com/must-have-items-for-day-rides-western-mule-nov-2014/

Friday, January 11, 2019

4 easy ways to ice-proof your horse's hooves

Equus.com - Full Article

The rock-hard accumulations of ice and snow that can get packed into a horse’s feet can cause lameness and injury. Here’s how to keep hoof ice balls from forming.


MELINDA FRECKLETON, DVM, WITH CHRISTINE BARAKAT
JAN 4, 2019

One winter hazard that riders in northern climes know well is ice balls. When snow and ice get packed under a horse’s hoof, it warms up slightly against the sole, then freezes readily against the cold metal of the shoe. The ice can quickly build up until the horse is walking on a hard, solid mass of frozen material, called “ice balls” or “snowballs.” The wetter and more dense the snow, the more likely it is that snowballs will occur. “Slushier” ice will fall away from the foot more readily, and light, dry snow won’t pack well, but wet or icy snow can easily get compacted into a tight, hard block.

Walking on the uneven mass even for a short time can cause a number of problems from tripping and sliding to strains or sprains of the muscles, tendons and joints. Persistent snowballs can lead to bruises and hoof cracks. Horses do OK much of the
time when there is snow all around, but once on a firm surface, many will teeter as if they are on high-heeled shoes.

Removing large masses of ice from under your horse’s feet can be difficult, and by the time you discover them, the damage may already be underway. It’s better to take measures to prevent them from forming:...

Read more here:
https://equusmagazine.com/management/prevent-ice-balls?utm_source=EQUUSNL&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=Newsletter&_hsenc=p2ANqtz-9pT6YWtxDhpUGB2ziKvTD7hYNECD3B0GI8pH2jC7AtSpdiWDaYdl9l696nJXPQV84xwt3gg88zafS1DphapwBlBJzhQA&_hsmi=68843624

Arizona’s wild horse paradox

HCN.org - Full Article

Debbie Weingarten
Dec. 13, 2018

Activists and agencies try to balance the West’s horse mythology against herd impacts.

The horses stood chest-deep in the river, pulling up long strands of eelgrass with their teeth. There must have been 20 of them, in colors ranging from nearly white to ruddy brown. The babies stood wobbly in the current. My partner and I floated quietly past in our kayak, trying not to spook them. But it was a sweltering Friday in July, and we were followed by hollering college students in rented innertubes. Beer coolers floated along behind them, and music reverberated off the canyon walls. Uninterested and used to the party, the horses barely looked up.

A stone’s throw from metropolitan Phoenix, the Salt River runs through the Tonto National Forest, where deer, bighorn sheep and bald eagles live amid cactus and mesquite bosques. But the most famous and controversial inhabitants are the area’s “wild” horses. Once slated for removal by the U.S. Forest Service for reasons of public safety, today these horses are protected by state law. Now, in the first arrangement of its kind, a state government is working with a nonprofit to manage horses on federal land. Now long-feuding entities must work together to find a way to balance the horses — and the mythology of the American West they represent — with river and land conservation and public safety...

Read more here:
https://www.hcn.org/articles/wild-horses-arizonas-wild-horse-paradox?utm_source=wcn1&utm_medium=email

Tuesday, January 08, 2019

Winter-Driving Tips

USRider.org - Full Article

This winter, follow these 12 expert winter-driving tips to help keep you and your horse safe


By EquiSearch | 12/14/2018

Winter is coming. For some of us, winter is already here! USRider Equestrian Motor Plan reminds everyone who travels with horses to be careful, and to perform routine preventative trailer maintenance to enhance overall travel safety.

Maintain your vehicle according to the manufacturer’s service schedule, and take your vehicle to a trusted mechanic. This is especially crucial for heavy-duty vehicles towing precious cargo. Be proactive rather than reactive.

“Yes, it’s cold outside, but you still need to take the time to perform safety checks on your tow vehicle and trailer before traveling,” says Bill Riss, general manager of USRider.

Establish a relationship with a trusted mechanic who’s certified with the National Institute of Automotive Service Excellence (ASE). Do this before your vehicle breaks down on the side of the highway while towing your trailer, especially in bad weather.

1. Invest in snow tires. During winter months, traction tires are recommended. Such tires must have at least one-eighth-inch of tread, and be labeled "Mud and Snow," "M+S," or "All-Season," or have a mountain/snowflake symbol. See your tire dealer to find out which tires are best for your vehicle...

Read more here:
http://www.usrider.org/article/winterdriving-tips-111?utm_source=TravelTip&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=December2018&_hsenc=p2ANqtz-_R6sFcmhiWHgsBzcAtRo_tUlN5mIqA1Lg9xKJdqJ2F1eBC-y20PufFPPukW-2Q1gsN7_B7beFd3Cvh36o2_iFdjRc7Dg&_hsmi=68431140

Saturday, January 05, 2019

Equus “Story of the Horse” Premieres on PBS

PBS.org

Premiere date: January 16, 2019 | 0:00:30
Premieres Wednesdays, January 16-23, 8 pm EST (check local listings)

The relationship between man and his noble steed is almost as old as civilization itself. Ever since the mysterious beginning of our extraordinary partnership, horses helped shape the human world. At the speed of a horse, our ancestors conquered distances and built empires. Together, humans and horses flourished side by side. What makes us so perfect for each other?

Join anthropologist Dr. Niobe Thompson and equine experts on a two-part adventure around the world and throughout time to discover the origins of the horse. In a stunning 3D reconstruction, see the earliest member of the horse family rise from a fossil bed and begin a transformation into the magnificent animal we know today. Discover why horses have 360-degree vision and gallop on a single toe. Explore the science of speed with renowned racehorse trainers. Uncover the emotional intelligence of horses and their deep connection with humans. Encounter extraordinary horse breeds from Saudi Arabia to Kentucky to Siberia, and meet the horses of Sable Island that are truly returning to the wild ways of their ancestors. Filmed over 18 months across 3 continents, featuring drone and helicopter-mounted RED aerials, extensive Phantom slow-motion footage, and a live-recorded symphonic score.

Friday, January 04, 2019

Trail-Sharing Tips Horseback Riders Can Use

Thehorse.com - Full Article

Remember these three keys to riding your horse on multiuse trails safely.

Posted by Kim McCarrel | Jan 3, 2019

You’re enjoying a beautiful sunny day on the trail with your horse. The trail is designated multiuse, so as you ride you’re likely to meet hikers, mountain bikers, and maybe even motorcycle or ATV users. Your enjoyment and safety depend on how well everyone shares the trail.

You can’t control the actions of other trail users, of course. But your actions and demeanor can make the difference between a safe, friendly interaction and a nasty confrontation. And it’s easy to remember how to safely share the trail: Just stop, speak, and smile...

Read more at:
https://thehorse.com/164656/trail-sharing-tips-horseback-riders-can-use/

Tuesday, January 01, 2019

Can Diet Prevent Scratches in Horses?

Thehorse.com - Full Article

My horse is turned out to pasture for at least part of each day. Every winter he gets scratches. Is there anything I can do nutritionally that might help prevent them?

Posted by Clair Thunes, PhD | Dec 24, 2018

Q.My horse is turned out to pasture for at least part of each day. Every winter he gets scratches. Is there anything I can do nutritionally that might help prevent them?

A.Most of the time scratches aren’t too big of an issue. However, they can indeed become a big problem literally overnight. I personally had a mare who went from having a couple of tiny spots of scratches one evening to being nonweight-bearing lame and having full-on cellulitis in the leg the next morning. My advice is twofold: don’t ignore scratches if present, and prevention is ideal.

What is Scratches?
Scratches—sometimes referred to as grease heel, mud fever, or equine pastern dermatitis—is a skin infection on the back of the pastern and heel; sometimes scabs can extend as far as the fetlock area...

Read more here:
https://thehorse.com/164533/can-diet-prevent-scratches-in-horses/